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Review
The relationship of non-cognitive factors to academic and clinical performance in graduate rehabilitation science students in the United States: a systematic review  
Kelly Reynolds, Caroline Bazemore, Cannon Hanebuth, Steph Hendren, Maggie Horn
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:31.   Published online November 23, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.31
  • 5,717 View
  • 262 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Rehabilitation science programs utilize cognitive and non-cognitive factors to select students who can complete the didactic and clinical portions of the program and pass the licensure exam. Cognitive factors such a prior grade point average and standardized test scores are known to be predictive of academic performance, but the relationship of non-cognitive factors and performance is less clear. The purpose of this systematic review was to explore the relationship of non-cognitive factors to academic and clinical performance in rehabilitation science programs.
Methods
A search of 7 databases was conducted using the following eligibility criteria: graduate programs in physical therapy (PT), occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, United States-based programs, measurement of at least 1 non-cognitive factor, measurement of academic and/or clinical performance, and quantitative reporting of results. Articles were screened by title, abstract, and full text, and data were extracted.
Results
After the comprehensive screening, 21 articles were included in the review. Seventy-six percent of studies occurred in PT students. Grit, self-efficacy, emotional intelligence, and stress were the most commonly studied factors. Only self-efficacy, emotional intelligence, and personality traits were examined in clinical and academic contexts. The results were mixed for all non-cognitive factors. Higher grit and self-efficacy tended to be associated with better performance, while stress was generally associated with worse outcomes.
Conclusion
No single non-cognitive factor was consistently related to clinical or academic performance in rehabilitation science students. There is insufficient evidence currently to recommend the evaluation of a specific non-cognitive factor for admissions decisions.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Predicting performance in a doctor of physical therapy gross anatomy course based on an exploratory factor analysis of the anatomical self‐efficacy instrument
    Kelly Reynolds, Shani Mueller, Maggie Horn
    Anatomical Sciences Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Relationship between Cognitive Factors and Noncognitive Factors, Including Grit, and NBCOT® Exam Performance
    Anne H. Zachry, Stephanie Lancaster, Amy Hall, April Hilsdon
    Occupational Therapy In Health Care.2024; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of 2 Methods of Debriefing for Learning of Interprofessional Handoff Skills
    Julie Ronnebaum, Chunfa Jie, Kristina Salazar
    Journal of Acute Care Physical Therapy.2023; 14(1): 18.     CrossRef
  • Investigating Latent Interactions between Students’ Affective Cognition and Learning Performance: Meta-Analysis of Affective and Cognitive Factors
    Jian Li, Eryong Xue, Chenchang Li, Yunshu He
    Behavioral Sciences.2023; 13(7): 555.     CrossRef
  • Relationship between digital capabilities and academic performance: the mediating effect of self-efficacy
    Rasha Kadri Ibrahim, Aisha Namshan Aldawsari
    BMC Nursing.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Grouping of academic achievements’ predictors in Russian current psychological and pedagogical studies
    Roman A. Dormidontov
    Psychological-Pedagogical Journal GAUDEAMUS.2022; (4): 18.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Effectiveness of pre-admission data and letters of recommendation to predict students who will need professional behavior intervention during clinical rotations in the United States  
Chalee Engelhard, Rebecca Leugers, Jenna Stephan
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:26.   Published online June 27, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.26
  • 27,698 View
  • 296 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The study aimed at finding the value of letters of recommendation in predicting professional behavior problems in the clinical portion of a Doctor of Physical Therapy program learning cohorts from 2009-2014 in the United States. De-identified records of 137 Doctor of Physical Therapy graduates were examined by the descriptive statistics and comparison analysis. Thirty letters of recommendation were investigated based on grounded theory from 10 student applications with 5 randomly selected students of interest and 5 non-students of interest. Critical thinking, organizational skills, and judgement were statistically significant and quantitative differentiating characteristics. Qualitatively, significant characteristics of the student of interest included effective communication and cultural competency. Meanwhile, those of nonstudents of interest included conflicting personality descriptor, commitment to learning, balance, teamwork skills, potential future success, compatible learning skills, effective leadership skills, and emotional intelligence. Emerged significant characteristics did not consistently match common non-professional behavior issues encountered in clinic. Pre-admission data and letters of recommendation appear of limited value in predicting professional behavior performance in clinic.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Vital Role of Professionalism in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
    Julie K. Silver, Sara Cuccurullo, Lyn D. Weiss, Christopher Visco, Mooyeon Oh-Park, Danielle Perret Karimi, Walter R. Frontera, Talya K. Fleming, Glendaliz Bosques, Saurabha Bhatnagar, Anne Felicia Ambrose, Vu Q.C. Nguyen
    American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation.2020; 99(4): 273.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions