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Comparison of the knowledge, attitudes, and perception of barriers regarding adverse drug reaction reporting between pharmacy and medical students in Pakistan  
Muhammad Umair Khan, Akram Ahmad, Areeba Ejaz, Syed Ata Rizvi, Ayesha Sardar, Kazim Hussain, Tayyaba Zaffar, Shazia Q. Jamshed
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:28.   Published online June 17, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.28
  • 30,873 View
  • 214 Download
  • 14 Web of Science
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The goal of this study was to compare the knowledge and attitudes of pharmacy and medical students regarding adverse drug reactions (ADRs), as well as their perceptions of barriers to ADR reporting, in a Higher Education Commission-recognised Pakistani university.
Methods
A cross-sectional study was conducted among final-year pharmacy (n=91) and medical (n=108) students in Pakistan from June 1 to July 31, 2014. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. The responses of pharmacy students were compared to those of medical students.
Results
Pharmacy students had a significantly better knowledge of ADRs than medical students (mean±SD, 5.61±1.78 vs. 3.23±1.60; P<0.001). Gender showed a significant relationship to knowledge about ADRs, and male participants were apparently more knowledgeable than their female counterparts (P<0.001). The attitudes of pharmacy students regarding their capability to handle and report ADRs were significantly more positive than those of medical students (P<0.05). In comparison to pharmacy students, a lack of knowledge of where and how to report ADRs was the main barrier that medical students perceived to ADR reporting (P=0.001).
Conclusion
Final-year pharmacy students exhibited more knowledge about ADRs and showed more positive attitudes regarding their capacity to handle and report ADRs than final-year medical students.

Citations

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  • Teaching pharmacovigilance to French medical students during the COVID-19 pandemic: Interest of distance learning clinical reasoning sessions
    François Montastruc, Fabrice Muscari, Ivan Tack, Justine Benevent, Margaux Lafaurie, Claire de Canecaude, Haleh Bagheri, Fabien Despas, Christine Damase-Michel, Geneviève Durrieu, Agnès Sommet
    Therapies.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Enhancing Patient Safety: A Cross-Sectional Study to Assess Medical Interns’ Attitude and Knowledge About Medication Safety in Saudi Arabia
    Raghad Hijazi, Hatouf Sukkarieh, Rami Bustami, Jibran Khan, Reema Aldhalaan
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Assessment of the Current State of Pharmacovigilance System in Pakistan Using Indicator-Based Assessment Tool
    Muhammad Akhtar Abbas Khan, Saima Hamid, Tofeeq Ur-Rehman, Zaheer-Ud-Din Babar
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A National Survey of Community Pharmacists’ Viewpoints About Pharmacovigilance and Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting in Saudi Arabia
    Mona Y. Alsheikh, Moudi M. Alasmari
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    N. Nchinech, Z. Lachhab, M. Obtel, Y. Cherrah, S. Serragui
    Annales Pharmaceutiques Françaises.2021; 79(3): 291.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Medical, Pharmacy, and Nursing Students Towards Pharmacovigilance and Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting at University of Gondar College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Northwest Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Masho Tigabe Tekel, Abaynesh Fentahun Bekalu, Faisel Dula Sema
    Advances in Medical Education and Practice.2021; Volume 12: 1129.     CrossRef
  • Quality assessment of individual case safety reports in pharmacovigilance in Burkina Faso
    Nazaire Roamba, Emile Windné Ouedraogo, Estelle Noella Hoho Youl, S. Bourekkadi, H. Hami, A. Mokhtari, K. Slimani, A. Soulaymani
    E3S Web of Conferences.2021; 319: 01073.     CrossRef
  • Pharmacovigilance in healthcare education: students’ knowledge, attitude and perception: a cross-sectional study in Saudi Arabia
    Monira Alwhaibi, Ghaida Alhindi, Majd Alshamrani, Maryam Bin Essa, Noha A. Al Aloola, Tariq M. Alhawassi
    BMC Medical Education.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, attitude and practices about pharmacovigilance and adverse drug reactions among dental research assistants in a Turkish hospital: a cross-sectional study
    Yusuf KARATAŞ, Zakir KHAN, Ezgi Sena GÖREN ÖZAGİL, Ayşe Büşra ABUSSUUTOĞLU, Aykut PELİT, Elif KOÇAK
    Journal of Health Sciences and Medicine.2020; 3(4): 367.     CrossRef
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    Yun Mi Yu, Seungyeon Kim, Kyung Hee Choi, Kyeong Hye Jeong, Euni Lee
    Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology.2019; 124(5): 591.     CrossRef
  • Reporting of Adverse Drug Reactions in Primary Care Settings in Kuwait: A Comparative Study of Physicians and Pharmacists
    Jacinthe Lemay, Fatemah M. Alsaleh, Lulwa Al-Buresli, Mohammed Al-Mutairi, Eman A. Abahussain, Tania Bayoud
    Medical Principles and Practice.2018; 27(1): 30.     CrossRef
  • What Future Healthcare Professionals Need to Know About Pharmacovigilance: Introduction of the WHO PV Core Curriculum for University Teaching with Focus on Clinical Aspects
    Rike van Eekeren, Leàn Rolfes, Andries S. Koster, Lara Magro, Gurumurthy Parthasarathi, Hussain Al Ramimmy, Tim Schutte, Daisuke Tanaka, Eugène van Puijenbroek, Linda Härmark
    Drug Safety.2018; 41(11): 1003.     CrossRef
  • Urgent need to modernize pharmacovigilance education in healthcare curricula: review of the literature
    Michael Reumerman, J. Tichelaar, B. Piersma, M. C. Richir, M. A. van Agtmael
    European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.2018; 74(10): 1235.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge and awareness regarding Chikungunya: a cross-sectional study among healthcare students in a private university, Malaysia
    Abdul Nazer Ali, Chew Jia Hui, Sunil K Prajapati, Nazer Zulfikar Ahmed
    MOJ Bioequivalence & Bioavailability.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Palestinian pharmacists’ knowledge of issues related to using psychotropic medications in older people: a cross-sectional study
    Ramzi Shawahna, Mais Khaskiyyi, Hadeel Abdo, Yasmen Msarwe, Rania Odeh, Souad Salame
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2017; 14: 8.     CrossRef
  • Perspective of Saudi undergraduate pharmacy students on pharmacovigilance and adverse drug reaction reporting: A National Survey
    Nazmeyah Alkayyal, Ejaz Cheema, Muhammad Abdul Hadi
    Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning.2017; 9(5): 779.     CrossRef
Promoting collaboration and cultural competence for physician assistant and physical therapist students: a cross-cultural decentralized interprofessional education model  
Kathleen De Oliveira, Sara North, Barbra Beck, Jane Hopp
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:20.   Published online May 27, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.20
  • 33,626 View
  • 210 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
As the United States health care model progresses towards medical teams and the country’s population continues to diversify, the need for health professional education programs to develop and implement culturally specific interprofessional education (IPE) becomes increasingly imperative. A wide range of models exists for delivering and implementing IPE in health education, but none have included the cultural components that are vital in educating the health professional. Methods: A cross-cultural decentralized IPE model for physician assistant (PA) and physical therapy (PT) students was developed. This three-part IPE series was created using an established cultural curricular model and began with the exploration of self, continued with the examination of various dimensions of culture, and concluded with the exploration of the intersection between health and culture. We assessed student satisfaction of the IPE experiences and students’ engagement and attitudes towards IPE using a three-item open-ended questionnaire administered after each cross-cultural activity and the Interprofessional Education Series Survey (IESS) upon the completion of the series. Results: IESS responses showed that PA and PT students reported benefits in interprofessional collaboration and cultural awareness and expressed overall satisfaction with the series. Qualitative analysis revealed growth in student response depth consistent with the scaffolded focus of each IPE module in the series. Conclusion: The trends in this three-part series suggest that institutions looking to develop culturally inclusive IPE educational initiatives may have success through a decentralized model mirroring the effective cultural progression focused on addressing exploration of self, examination of various dimensions of culture, and exploration of the intersection between health and culture.

Citations

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    Annals of Global Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Interprofessional education workshop on aging: student perceptions of interprofessional collaboration, aging, and cultural fluency
    Carey A. Winkler, Jill A. Campbell, Kelli A. Nielsen, Renee M. Broughten, Ambria C. Crusan, Stacy M. Husebo
    Journal of Interprofessional Care.2021; 35(sup1): 9.     CrossRef
  • Using a Low-Fidelity Simulation to Enhance Cultural Awareness and Emotional Intelligence in Nursing Students
    Adriana D. Glenn, Faith Claman
    Nursing Education Perspectives.2020; 41(1): 63.     CrossRef
  • A Systematic Meta‐Analysis of the Effect of Interprofessional Education on Health Professions Students’ Attitudes
    Zairan Wang, Fenglian Feng, Shang Gao, Jiping Yang
    Journal of Dental Education.2019; 83(12): 1361.     CrossRef
  • Incorporando a Competência Cultural para Atenção à Saúde Materna em População Quilombola na Educação das Profissões da Saúde
    Reginaldo Antônio de Oliveira Freitas Júnior, Carolina Araújo Damásio Santos, Lilian Lira Lisboa, Ana Karla Monteiro Santana de Oliveira Freitas, Vera Lúcia Garcia, George Dantas de Azevedo
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2018; 42(2): 100.     CrossRef
  • Attitudes of Physician Assistant Educators Toward Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Care
    Laura A. Levy, Kathleen Mathieson
    Journal of Physician Assistant Education.2017; 28(2): 72.     CrossRef
  • Unmet needs in health training among nurses in rural Chinese township health centers: a cross-sectional hospital-based study
    Yan Mo, Guijie Hu, Yanhua Yi, Yanping Ying, Huiqiao Huang, Zhongxian Huang, Jiafeng Lin
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2017; 14: 22.     CrossRef
  • Will the year 2016 augur well for better patient safety and health of residents in Korea according to the enactment of the Act for improving the resident training environment and enhancing resident’s status?
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2016; 13: 2.     CrossRef
  • Direct Engagement With Communities and Interprofessional Learning to Factor Culture Into End-of-Life Health Care Delivery
    Nathan A. Boucher
    American Journal of Public Health.2016; 106(6): 996.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions