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Is online objective structured clinical examination teaching an acceptable replacement in post-COVID-19 medical education in the United Kingdom?: a descriptive study  
Vashist Motkur, Aniket Bharadwaj, Nimalesh Yogarajah
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:30.   Published online November 7, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.30
  • 1,922 View
  • 138 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) restrictions resulted in an increased emphasis on virtual communication in medical education. This study assessed the acceptability of virtual teaching in an online objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) series and its role in future education.
Methods
Six surgical OSCE stations were designed, covering common surgical topics, with specific tasks testing data interpretation, clinical knowledge, and communication skills. These were delivered via Zoom to students who participated in student/patient/examiner role-play. Feedback was collected by asking students to compare online teaching with previous experiences of in-person teaching. Descriptive statistics were used for Likert response data, and thematic analysis for free-text items.
Results
Sixty-two students provided feedback, with 81% of respondents finding online instructions preferable to paper equivalents. Furthermore, 65% and 68% found online teaching more efficient and accessible, respectively, than in-person teaching. Only 34% found communication with each other easier online; Forty percent preferred online OSCE teaching to in-person teaching. Students also expressed feedback in positive and negative free-text comments.
Conclusion
The data suggested that generally students were unwilling for online teaching to completely replace in-person teaching. The success of online teaching was dependent on the clinical skill being addressed; some were less amenable to a virtual setting. However, online OSCE teaching could play a role alongside in-person teaching.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Feasibility and reliability of the pandemic-adapted online-onsite hybrid graduation OSCE in Japan
    Satoshi Hara, Kunio Ohta, Daisuke Aono, Toshikatsu Tamai, Makoto Kurachi, Kimikazu Sugimori, Hiroshi Mihara, Hiroshi Ichimura, Yasuhiko Yamamoto, Hideki Nomura
    Advances in Health Sciences Education.2024; 29(3): 949.     CrossRef
  • Should Virtual Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) Teaching Replace or Complement Face-to-Face Teaching in the Post-COVID-19 Educational Environment: An Evaluation of an Innovative National COVID-19 Teaching Programme
    Charles Gamble, Alice Oatham, Raj Parikh
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Comparison of the use of manikins and simulated patients in a multidisciplinary in situ medical simulation program for healthcare professionals in the United Kingdom  
Marrit Meerdink, Joshua Khan
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:8.   Published online April 20, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.8
  • 7,027 View
  • 390 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Simulation training is increasingly popular in healthcare education, and often relies on specially designed manikins. However, it is also possible to work with actors, or simulated patients (SPs), which may provide a greater sense of realism. This study aimed to compare these 2 approaches, to ascertain which makes healthcare professionals feel most comfortable, which leads to the greatest improvement in confidence, and which is most beneficial to learning.
Methods
This study was embedded in a pre-existing multidisciplinary in situ simulation program. A multidisciplinary group of learners from a range of backgrounds—including nurses, doctors, and other allied health professionals—were asked to complete a questionnaire about their learning preferences. We collected 204 responses from 40 simulation sessions over 4 months, from September to December 2019. Of these 204 responses, 123 described using an SP and 81 described using a manikin.
Results
We found that 58% of respondents believed they would feel more comfortable working with an actor, while 17% would feel more comfortable using a manikin. Learners who used both modalities reported a significant increase in confidence (P<0.0001 for both). Participants felt that both modalities were beneficial to learning, but SPs provided significantly more benefits to learning than manikins (P<0.0001). The most common reason favoring SP-based simulation was the greater realism.
Conclusion
In scenarios that could reasonably be provided using either modality, we suggest that educators should give greater consideration to using SP-based simulation.

Citations

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  • Communication and swallowing training of stroke‐specialized health professionals using transdisciplinary knowledge in a patient–actor scenario: A case report
    Maria da Assunção Coelho de Matos, Ana Rita Pinheiro, Isabel Maria Monteiro da Costa, Joaquim Alvarelhão
    International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders.2024; 59(2): 798.     CrossRef
  • Learning outcomes and cost-utility analysis of hybrid patient and mannequin-based simulation
    Juana Perpiñá-Galvañ, Silvia Satorra-Rodríguez, Ana Isabel Gutiérrez-García, Noelia García-Aracil, Lourdes José-Alcaide, Néstor Montoro-Pérez, Rocío Juliá-Sanchís
    Nurse Education Today.2024; 132: 106003.     CrossRef
  • Promoting knowledge of metered dose inhaler (MDI) usage among pharmacy professional students through a mobile app
    Muhammad Thesa Ghozali, Tasya Aulia Mutiara
    Journal of Asthma.2024; 61(8): 835.     CrossRef
  • Optimizing Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS®) to Maximize Readiness
    Joseph R Danford, Florencio Reyes, Jennifer M Gurney, Joshua P Smith, Daniel J Stinner
    Military Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • What is the impact of simulation‐based training for paediatric procedures on patient outcomes, cost and latent safety threats?
    Samuel E. Graef, Nima Karimi, Maggie Xu, Jo‐Anne Petropoulos, Quang N. Ngo, Elif Bilgic
    The Clinical Teacher.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Standardized Patients Versus Mannequins in Mental Health Simulation
    Rebecca Luebbert, Amelia Perez, Angela Andrews, Tracy Webster-Cooley
    Journal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association.2023; 29(4): 283.     CrossRef
  • Use of an in-house-developed, 3D-printed mannequin for emergency medicine training among medical students
    Zulvikar Syambani Ulhaq, Ferry Nur Nasyroh, Achmad Arief Hidayatullah, Christyaji Indradmojo, Amalia Nur Aisa, Gita Vita Soraya
    Educación Médica.2023; 24(6): 100848.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Simulation on Nursing Student Perceptions of Readiness to Provide End-of-Life Care
    Rebecca Dias, Kathryn Robinson, Patricia Poirier
    Journal of Hospice & Palliative Nursing.2023; 25(6): E116.     CrossRef
  • The Impact of a Simulation-Based Learning Activity Using Actor Patients on Final Year Nursing Students’ Learning
    Dianne Marshall, Michelle Honey
    Nursing Praxis in Aotearoa New Zealand.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Metaverse in Medical Education
    Agus Rizal Ardy Hariandy Hamid, Ferdiansyah Sultan Ayasasmita Rusdhy, Prasandhya Astagiri Yusuf
    Medical Journal of Indonesia.2023; 32(2): 67.     CrossRef
  • In situ simulation and its different applications in healthcare: an integrative review
    Marcos Maciel Candido Justino dos Santos, Sara Fiterman Lima, Carine Freitas Galvão Vieira, Alexandre Slullitel, Elaine Cristina Negri Santos, Gerson Alves Pereira Júnior
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Simulação in situ e suas diferentes aplicações na área da saúde: uma revisão integrativa
    Marcos Maciel Candido Justino dos Santos, Sara Fiterman Lima, Carine Freitas Galvão Vieira, Alexandre Slullitel, Elaine Cristina Negri Santos, Gerson Alves Pereira Júnior
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Perception of Realism and Acquisition of Clinical Skills in Simulated Pediatric Dentistry Scenarios
    Begoña Bartolomé Villar, Irene Real Benlloch, Ana De la Hoz Calvo, Gleyvis Coro-Montanet
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(18): 11387.     CrossRef
  • Just-in-Time Orientation of Non-Critical Care Nurses to the Critical Care Environment
    Meghan Doelger, Karen Kesten, Bonnie Sakallaris
    The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing.2022; 53(10): 465.     CrossRef
  • Content validity test of a safety checklist for simulated participants in simulation-based education in the United Kingdom: a methodological study
    Matthew Bradley
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 21.     CrossRef
  • A manikin or human simulator—development of a tool for measuring students’ perception
    Kamil Torres, Phillip Evans, Izabela Mamcarz, Natalia Radczuk, Anna Torres
    PeerJ.2022; 10: e14214.     CrossRef
Medical students’ pattern of self-directed learning prior to and during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic period and its implications for Free Open Access Meducation within the United Kingdom  
Jack Barton, Kathrine Sofia Rallis, Amber Elyse Corrigan, Ella Hubbard, Antonia Round, Greta Portone, Ashvin Kuri, Tien Tran, Yu Zhi Phuah, Katie Knight, Jonathan Round
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:5.   Published online April 6, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.5
  • 7,717 View
  • 365 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Self-directed learning (SDL) has been increasingly emphasized within medical education. However, little is known about the SDL resources medical students use. This study aimed to identify patterns in medical students’ SDL behaviors, their SDL resource choices, factors motivating these choices, and the potential impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on these variables.
Methods
An online cross-sectional survey comprising multiple-choice, ranked, and free-text response questions were disseminated to medical students across all 41 UK medical schools between April and July 2020. Independent study hours and sources of study materials prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic were compared. Motivational factors guiding resource choices and awareness of Free Open Access Meducation were also investigated.
Results
The target sample was 75 students per medical school across a total of 41 medical schools within the United Kingdom (3,075 total students), and 1,564 responses were analyzed. University-provided information comprised the most commonly used component of independent study time, but a minority of total independent study time. Independent study time increased as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic (P<0.001). All sub-cohorts except males reported a significant increase in the use of resources such as free websites and question banks (P<0.05) and paid websites (P<0.05) as a result of the pandemic. Accessibility was the most influential factor guiding resource choice (Friedman’s μrank=3.97, P<0.001).
Conclusion
The use of learning resources independent of university provision is increasing. Educators must ensure equitable access to such materials while supporting students in making informed choices regarding their independent study behaviors.

Citations

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  • The state of health professions students’ self-directed learning ability during online study and the factors that influence it
    Xiaoyue Xu, Ziyi Li, Louisa Mackay, Na Li, Yaheng Zhang, Yujie Wu, Yang Zhang
    BMC Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Exploring University Students' Self-Directed Learning in Online Learning
    Lin Chen, Norzihani Saharuddin
    International Journal of Online Pedagogy and Course Design.2024; 14(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Assessing medical students’ perception and educational experience during COVID-19 pandemic
    Ernest Z. Low, Niall J. O’Sullivan, Vidushi Sharma, Isabella Sebastian, Roisin Meagher, Dalal Alomairi, Ebraheem H. Alhouti, Claire L. Donohoe, Michael E. Kelly
    Irish Journal of Medical Science (1971 -).2023; 192(3): 1015.     CrossRef
  • Students' perceptions on how e-learning platforms in universities should be improved to increase the quality of educational services
    Dodu Gheorghe Petrescu, Cristina Neculau, Aida Geamanu, Mihai Adrian Dobra, Ana-Maria Nedelcu, Alin Gabriel Sterian
    Journal of Medicine and Life.2023; 16(9): 1316.     CrossRef
  • Medical students’ self-directed learning skills during online learning amid the COVID-19 pandemic in a Korean medical school
    Jihyun Si
    Korean Journal of Medical Education.2022; 34(2): 145.     CrossRef
  • Advances in e-learning in undergraduate clinical medicine: a systematic review
    T. Delungahawatta, S. S. Dunne, S. Hyde, L. Halpenny, D. McGrath, A. O’Regan, C. P. Dunne
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Patient as teacher sessions contextualize learning, enhancing knowledge, communication, and participation of pharmacy students in the United Kingdom  
Andrew Martin Lunn, Ann Urmston, Steven Seymour, Andrea Manfrin
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:15.   Published online May 20, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.15
  • 6,417 View
  • 176 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to evaluate the impact of Patient As Teacher (PAT) sessions on the knowledge, communication skills, and participation of pharmacy students in the United Kingdom.
Methods
During the academic year 2019–2020, year 1 and 2 pharmacy students at the University of Central Lancashire were invited to complete a questionnaire following PAT sessions. Data were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics, including mean and standard deviation for: continuous variables and reliability analysis. Pearson’s chi-square or Fisher exact test, odds ratio, and phi were used for analyzing dichotomous variables. Thematic analysis was used for free text comments.
Results
Sixty eight of 228 students participated (response rate of 29.8%). No statistical difference was found between gender (P=0.090); a statistically significant difference was found between year (P=0.008). Cronbach’s α (0.809) confirmed a good internal consistency. Ninety-seven percent of the students learned a lot, and 85.3% appreciated and valued the PAT sessions; 89.7% wanted more sessions. Ninety-two point seven percent perceived the sessions to contextualize their learning. Five questions were dichotomized by grouping the responses into negative and positive; 90.3% of responses were positive and did not show statistically significant differences in gender and year of study. Overall students’ free text comments were positive, but active listening and consultation appeared in the positive and negative domains, highlighting the need for more student engagement.
Conclusion
PAT sessions had a positive impact on students’ knowledge, communication skills and participation, and contextualized learning. They provide a valuable contribution to the pharmacy students’ experience in the United Kingdom.

Citations

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  • Education Research: Introduction of a Standardized Communication Card to Facilitate Patient-as-Teacher Training for Medical Students in the Neurology Clerkship
    Carmen Priego-Pérez, Punthitra Arpornsuksant, Rachel Marie E. Salas, Charlene E. Gamaldo, Monica Lemmon, Roy E. Strowd, Doris G. Leung
    Neurology Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Metaverse applied to musculoskeletal pathology: Orthoverse and Rehabverse
    Juan M. Román-Belmonte, E. Carlos Rodríguez-Merchán, Hortensia De la Corte-Rodríguez
    Postgraduate Medicine.2023; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of outcomes associated with a Moodle-based lesson design for a research course in pharmacy education: An experimental pilot process validation study
    Syed Wasif Gillani, Shabaz Mohiuddin Gulam, Jumana Al-Salloum, Rizah Anwar Assadi
    Pharmacy Education.2021; 21: 642.     CrossRef
A conceptual model for students’ satisfaction with team-based learning using partial least squares structural equation modelling in a faculty of life sciences, in the United Kingdom  
Andrea Manfrin, Bugewa Apampa, Prabha Parthasarathy
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:36.   Published online November 13, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.36
  • 9,960 View
  • 229 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Students’ satisfaction is an essential element in higher education. This study aimed to identify paths and predictive power of students’ satisfaction during team-based learning (TBL) activities in the faculty of life sciences using partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM).
Methods
In 2018–2019, at the University of Sussex (Falmer, UK), 180 life science students exposed to TBL were invited to participate in the study. Team-Based-Learning-Student-Assessment-Instrument was used. A conceptual model was developed for testing six hypotheses. H1: What was the effect of TBL on student satisfaction? H2: What was the effect of lectures on student satisfaction? H3: What was the effect of TBL on accountability? H4: What was the effect of lectures on accountability? H5: What was the effect of accountability on student satisfaction? H6: What were the in-sample and out-of-sample predictive power of the model? The analysis was conducted using the PLS-SEM approach.
Results
Ninety-nine students participated in the study giving a 55% response rate. Confirmatory tetrad analysis suggested a reflective model. Construct reliability, validity, average extracted variance, and discriminant validity were confirmed. All path coefficients were positive, and 5 were statistically significant (H1: β=0.587, P<0:001; H2: β=0.262, P<0.001; H3: β=0.532, P<0.001; H4: β=0.063, P=0.546; H5: β=0.200, P=0.002). The in-sample predictive power was weak for Accountability, (R2=0.303; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.117–0.428; P<0.001) and substantial for Student Satisfaction (R2=0.678; 95% CI, 0.498–0.777; P<0.001). The out-of-sample predictive power was moderate.
Conclusion
The results have demonstrated the possibility of developing and testing a TBL conceptual model using PLS-SEM for the evaluation of path coefficients and predictive power relative to students’ satisfaction.

Citations

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  • The predictive power of electronic reporting system utilization on voluntary reporting of near-miss incidents among nurses: A PLS-SEM approach
    Mohammed Abdalraheem Alalaween, Noorliza Karia
    Belitung Nursing Journal.2024; 10(1): 15.     CrossRef
  • Psychometric properties of Clinical Learning Environment Inventory and its association with Moroccan nursing students’ satisfaction: A PLS-SEM approach
    Khadija Saka, Mohamed-Yassine Amarouch, Mohamed El Amine Ragala, Zarrouq Btissame, Adel Tahraoui, Youness El Achhab, Jaouad El-Hilaly
    Belitung Nursing Journal.2023; 9(1): 86.     CrossRef
  • The relationship between the pharmacist's role, patient understanding and satisfaction during the provision of a cost‐effective pharmacist‐led intervention
    Andrea Manfrin
    Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.2023; 29(5): 825.     CrossRef
  • Transitioning to Individual Learning Paths in the Opinions of Students and Teachers: the Case of the University of Tyumen
    Tatyana Gavrilyuk, Taisia Pogodaeva
    Sociological Journal.2023; 29(2): 51.     CrossRef
  • Equation Modelling of Automotive Textiles for Car Seat Covers in the Ghanaian Upholstery Industry
    Dr. Richard Selase Gbadegbe, Edem Kwami Buami, Charles Kumah, Bijou Asemsro, Prof. Maxwell Selase Akple
    International Journal of Innovative Technology and Exploring Engineering.2023; 12(12): 15.     CrossRef
  • Virtual Physical Education: Google Meet as an alternative platform for learning skill-based concepts
    Joseph Lobo
    Physical education of students.2022; 26(6): 296.     CrossRef
  • A SEM-NCA Approach towards Social Networks Marketing: Evaluating Consumers’ Sustainable Purchase Behavior with the Moderating Role of Eco-Friendly Attitude
    Pejman Ebrahimi, Datis Khajeheian, Maria Fekete-Farkas
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(24): 13276.     CrossRef
Perceptions of team-based learning using the Team-Based Learning Student Assessment Instrument: an exploratory analysis amongst pharmacy and biomedical students in the United Kingdom  
Prabha Parthasarathy, Bugewa Apampa, Andrea Manfrin
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:23.   Published online August 21, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.23
  • 13,777 View
  • 211 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to evaluate students’ perception of team-based learning (TBL) amongst a cohort exposed to this methodology for the first time at a university in the United Kingdom.
Methods
Between November and December 2018, 26 first-year Master of Pharmacy and 90 second-year Biomedical Science students of the School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, United Kingdom were invited to participate and requested to complete a questionnaire that contained quantitative and qualitative questions. The quantitative component was based on the Team-Based Learning Student Assessment Instrument (TBL-SAI). It additionally contained questions about key student characteristics.
Results
The response rate was 60% (70 of 116); of the participants, 74% (n=52) were females and 26% (n=18) males. The percentage of agreement in the TBL-SAI suggested a favourable response to TBL. The overall mean score for the TBL-SAI was 115.6 (standard deviation, 5.6; maximum score, 140), which was above the threshold of 102, thus suggesting a preference for TBL. Statistically significant differences were not found according to demographic characteristics. Students who predicted a final grade of ≥70% strongly agreed that TBL helped improve their grades. Some students highlighted issues with working in teams, and only 56% of students agreed that they could learn better in a team setting.
Conclusion
This study shows that students exposed to TBL for the first time favoured several aspects of TBL. However, more focused strategies including team-building activities and expert facilitation skills could potentially tackle resistance to working in teams.

Citations

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  • Introducing Group Open-Book Exams as a Learning and Assessment Strategy in the Clinical Biochemistry Course for Medical Students
    Basmah Eldakhakhny, Aliaa A Alamoudi, Hoda Gad, Yousef Almoghrabi, Taghreed Shamrani, Hussam Daghistani, Abdulhadi Bima, Ghada Ajabnoor, Fayza Alfayez, Ayman Elsamanoudy
    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The effect of repeated online Team-Based Learning on undergraduate nursing students: a quasi-experimental study
    Valeria Vannini, Sara Alberti, Orietta Valentini, Paola Ferri
    Teaching and Learning in Nursing.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Team-Based Learning in oral pathology teaching: Analysis of students' perception and impact on academic performance
    Lívia Gomes Véras Farias, Augusto César Leal da Silva Leonel, Danyel Elias da Cruz Pérez, Fábio Barbosa de Souza, Thayane Keyla de Souza Gomes, Elaine Judite de Amorim Carvalho
    EDUCATION SCIENCES AND SOCIETY.2023; (2): 345.     CrossRef
  • Service learning and the medical student affective domain
    Deborah Bartz, Andrea Pelletier, Erik K. Alexander, Nora Y. Osman, Natasha R. Johnson
    The Clinical Teacher.2022; 19(3): 247.     CrossRef
  • Applying team-based learning in a transnational post registration bachelor of nursing program in Singapore
    Rob Burton, Thea van de Mortel, Victoria Kain
    BMC Nursing.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Integrating Team-Based Learning Modules to Improve Civil Engineering Students’ Technical Writing Skills
    Shenghua Wu, Shenghua Zha, Sue Mattson
    Journal of Civil Engineering Education.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A conceptual model for students’ satisfaction with team-based learning using partial least squares structural equation modelling in a faculty of life sciences, in the United Kingdom
    Andrea Manfrin, Bugewa Apampa, Prabha Parthasarathy
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2019; 16: 36.     CrossRef
Research Articles
Handover practice amongst core surgical trainees at the Oxford School of Surgery  
Hazim Sadideen, Karim Hamaoui, Munir Saadeddin, Lucy Cogswell, Tim Goodacre, Tony Jefferis
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:3.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.3
  • 63,708 View
  • 147 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
To date there are no United Kingdom (UK) studies specifically evaluating handovers amongst core surgical trainees (CSTs). The Oxford School of Surgery examined regional handover practice, aiming to assess and improve trainee perception of handover, its quality, and ultimately patient care.
Methods
Based on two guidance documents ('Safe handover, safe patients' by the British Medical Association and 'Safe Surgical Practice' by the Royal College of Surgeons'), a 5-point Likert style questionnaire was designed, exploring handover practice, educational value, and satisfaction. This was given to 50 CSTs in 2010.
Results
There were responses from 40 CSTs (80.0 %). The most striking findings revolved around perceived educational value, formal training, and auditing practice with regards to handover, which were all remarkably lower than expected. CST handover was thus targeted in the Department of Plastic Surgery at the University Hospital, with the suggestion and implementation of targeted changes to improve practice.
Conclusion
In the EWTD era with many missed educational opportunities, daily handover represents an underused educational tool for CSTs, especially in light of competency-based and time-limited training. We recommend modifications based on our results and the literature and hope schools of surgery follow suit nationally by assessing and addressing handover practice.

Citations

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  • Assessing current handover practices in surgery: A survey of non-consultant hospital doctors in Ireland
    Jessica M. Ryan, Anastasija Simiceva, Conor Toale, Walter Eppich, Dara O. Kavanagh, Deborah A. McNamara
    The Surgeon.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Is it time for integration of surgical skills simulation into the United Kingdom undergraduate medical curriculum? A perspective from King’s College London School of Medicine  
Hamaoui Karim, Sadideen Hazim, Saadeddin Munir, Onida Sarah, Hoey Andrew W, Rees John
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2013;10:10.   Published online December 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2013.10.10
  • 34,554 View
  • 180 Download
  • 19 Crossref
PDF

Citations

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  • Understanding the relevance of surgical specialties in undergraduate medical education: Insights of graduates
    Fernando Girón‐Luque, Luis‐Jaime Téllez‐Rodríguez, Jorge Rueda‐Gutiérrez, John Vergel
    The Clinical Teacher.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Maisie de Wolf, Elizabeth Birch
    Clinical Anatomy.2021; 34(8): 1129.     CrossRef
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    Preeti Sandhu, Karanjeet Sagoo, Gurnoor Nagi
    International Journal of Surgery.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • An expert-led and artificial intelligence system-assisted tutoring course to improve the confidence of Chinese medical interns in suturing and ligature skills: a prospective pilot study
    Ying-Ying Yang, Boaz Shulruf
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2019; 16: 7.     CrossRef
  • Introduction of suturing skills acquisition into undergraduate surgical education: Early experience from Ile-Ife, Nigeria
    AdewaleAbdulwasiu Aderounmu, FunmilolaOlanike Wuraola, Olalekan Olasehinde, OludayoA Sowande, AdewaleOluseye Adisa
    Nigerian Journal of Surgery.2019; 25(2): 188.     CrossRef
  • Introducing In Vivo Dissection Modules for Undergraduate Level Trainees: What Is the Actual Benefit and How Could We Make It More Efficient?
    Michail Sideris, Apostolos Papalois, Korina Theodoraki, Georgios Paparoidamis, Nikolaos Staikoglou, Ismini Tsagkaraki, Efstratios Koletsis, Panagiotis Dedeilias, Nikolaos Lymperopoulos, Konstantinos Imprialos, Savvas Papagrigoriadis, Vassilios Papalois, G
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  • A Novel Clinical-Simulated Suture Education for Basic Surgical Skill: Suture on the Biological Tissue Fixed on Standardized Patient Evaluated with Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (OSATS) Tools
    Zhanlong Shen, Fan Yang, Pengji Gao, Li Zeng, Guanchao Jiang, Shan Wang, Yingjiang Ye, Fengxue Zhu
    Journal of Investigative Surgery.2018; 31(4): 333.     CrossRef
  • Simulation-Based Learning Strategies to Teach Undergraduate Students Basic Surgical Skills: A Systematic Review
    Iakovos Theodoulou, Marios Nicolaides, Thanos Athanasiou, Apostolos Papalois, Michail Sideris
    Journal of Surgical Education.2018; 75(5): 1374.     CrossRef
  • Early and prolonged opportunities to practice suturing increases medical student comfort with suturing during clerkships: Suturing during cadaver dissection
    Edward P. Manning, Priti L. Mishall, Maxwell D. Weidmann, Herschel Flax, Sam Lan, Mark Erlich, William B. Burton, Todd R. Olson, Sherry A. Downie
    Anatomical Sciences Education.2018; 11(6): 605.     CrossRef
  • Hands train the brain—what is the role of hand tremor and anxiety in undergraduate microsurgical skills?
    John Hanrahan, Michail Sideris, Terouz Pasha, Parmenion P. Tsitsopoulos, Iakovos Theodoulou, Marios Nicolaides, Efstratia-Maria Georgopoulou, Dimitris Kombogiorgas, Alexios Bimpis, Apostolos Papalois
    Acta Neurochirurgica.2018; 160(9): 1673.     CrossRef
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JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions