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Research article
Effect of an interprofessional simulation program on patient safety competencies of healthcare professionals in Switzerland: a before and after study  
Sylvain Boloré, Thomas Fassier, Nicolas Guirimand
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:25.   Published online August 28, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.25
  • 1,037 View
  • 132 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to identify the effects of a 12-week interprofessional simulation program, operated between February 2020 and January 2021, on the patient safety competencies of healthcare professionals in Switzerland.
Methods
The simulation training was based on 2 scenarios of hospitalized patients with septic shock and respiratory failure, and trainees were expected to demonstrate patient safety competencies. A single-group before and after study was conducted after the intervention—simulation program, using a measurement tool (the Health Professional Education in Patient Safety Survey) to measure the perceived competencies of physicians, nurses, and nursing assistants. Out of 57 participants, 37 answered the questionnaire surveys 4 times: 48 hours before the training, followed by post-surveys at 24 hours, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks after the training. The linear mixed effect model was applied for the analysis.
Results
Four components out of 6 perceived patient safety competencies improved at 6 weeks but returned to a similar level before training at 12 weeks. Competencies of “communicating effectively,” “managing safety risks,” “understanding human and environmental factors that influence patient safety,” and “recognize and respond to remove immediate risks of harm” are statistically significant both overall and in the comparison between before the training and 6 weeks after the training.
Conclusion
Interprofessional simulation programs contributed to developing some areas of patient safety competencies of healthcare professionals, but only for a limited time. Interprofessional simulation programs should be repeated and combined with other forms of support, including case discussions and debriefings, to ensure lasting effects.
Brief report
Benefits of focus group discussions beyond online surveys in course evaluations by medical students in the United States: a qualitative study  
Katharina Brandl, Soniya V. Rabadia, Alexander Chang, Jess Mandel
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:25.   Published online October 16, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.25
  • 22,151 View
  • 340 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
In addition to online questionnaires, many medical schools use supplemental evaluation tools such as focus groups to evaluate their courses. Although some benefits of using focus groups in program evaluation have been described, it is unknown whether these inperson data collection methods provide sufficient additional information beyond online evaluations to justify them. In this study, we analyze recommendations gathered from student evaluation team (SET) focus group meetings and analyzed whether these items were captured in open-ended comments within the online evaluations. Our results indicate that online evaluations captured only 49% of the recommendations identified via SETs. Surveys to course directors identified that 74% of the recommendations exclusively identified via the SETs were implemented within their courses. Our results indicate that SET meetings provided information not easily captured in online evaluations and that these recommendations resulted in actual course changes.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Grupos focais como ferramenta de pesquisa qualitativa na fisioterapia: implicações e expectativas
    Dartel Ferrari de Lima, Adelar Aparecido Sampaio
    Revista Pesquisa Qualitativa.2023; 11(27): 361.     CrossRef
  • Educational attainment for at-risk high school students: closing the gap
    Karen Miner-Romanoff
    SN Social Sciences.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Student evaluations of teaching and the development of a comprehensive measure of teaching effectiveness for medical schools
    Constantina Constantinou, Marjo Wijnen-Meijer
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • National Security Law Education in Hong Kong: Qualitative Evaluation Based on the Perspective of the Students
    Daniel T. L. Shek, Xiaoqin Zhu, Diya Dou, Xiang Li
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 20(1): 553.     CrossRef
  • Mentoring as a transformative experience
    Wendy A. Hall, Sarah Liva
    Mentoring & Tutoring: Partnership in Learning.2021; 29(1): 6.     CrossRef
Research article
Evaluation of an undergraduate occupational health program in Iran based on alumni perceptions: a structural equation model  
Semira Mehralizadeh, Alireza Dehdashti, Masoud Motalebi Kashani
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:16.   Published online July 26, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.16
  • 31,609 View
  • 309 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Evaluating educational programs can improve the quality of education. The present study evaluated the undergraduate occupational health program at the Semnan University of Medical Sciences in Semnan, Iran, with a focus on the associations between alumni perceptions of the learning environment and the outcomes of the occupational health program. Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted among alumni of the undergraduate occupational health program. We asked alumni to rate their perceptions of the items using a 4-point Likert scale. The associations between alumni perceptions of the educational program and curriculum, faculty, institutional resources, and learning outcomes were modeled and described using structural equation modeling procedures. Results: A descriptive analysis of alumni perceptions indicated low evaluations for the administrative system, practical and research-based courses, and the number of faculty members. We found that a structural model of the evaluation variables of curriculum, faculty qualifications, and institutional resources significantly predicted undergraduate educational outcomes. The curriculum had direct and indirect effects on learning outcomes, mediated by faculty. Conclusion: The findings of our study highlight the usefulness of the structural equation modeling approach for examining links between variables related to the learning process and learning outcomes. Surveys of alumni can provide data for reassessing the learning environment in the light of the professional competencies needed for occupational health graduates.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Integrated-Based Curriculum of Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms (ICPDF): What Factors Affect the Learning Outcome Attainment?
    Anis Yohana Chaerunisaa, Akhmad Habibi, Muhaimin Muhaimin, Mailizar Mailizar, Tommy Tanu Wijaya, Ahmad Samed Al-Adwan
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2023; 20(5): 4272.     CrossRef
Research Articles
Evaluation of a continuing professional development training program for physicians and physician assistants in hospitals in Laos based on the Kirkpatrick model  
Hyun Bae Yoon, Jwa-Seop Shin, Ketsomsouk Bouphavanh, Yu Min Kang
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:21.   Published online May 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.21
  • 30,789 View
  • 320 Download
  • 21 Web of Science
  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Medical professionals from Korea and Laos have been working together to develop a continuing professional development training program covering the major clinical fields of primary care. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the program from 2013 to 2014 using the Kirkpatrick model. Methods: A questionnaire was used to evaluate the reaction of the trainees, and the trainers assessed the level of trainees’ performance at the beginning and the end of each clinical section. The transfer (behavioral change) of the trainees was evaluated through the review of medical records written by the trainees before and after the training program. Results: The trainees were satisfied with the training program, for which the average score was 4.48 out of 5.0. The average score of the trainees’ performance at the beginning was 2.39 out of 5.0, and rose to 3.88 at the end of each section. The average score of the medical records written before the training was 2.92 out of 5.0, and it rose to 3.34 after the training. The number of patient visits to the district hospitals increased. Conclusion: The continuing professional development training program, which was planned and implemented with the full engagement and responsibility of Lao health professionals, proved to be effective.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Practicalities and dichotomies of education policy and practice of higher education in the Golden Triangle Area (Southeast Asia): Implications for international development
    Shine Wanna Aung, Than Than Aye
    Policy Futures in Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of cost-effectiveness of single-credit traffic safety course based on Kirkpatrick model: a case study of Iran
    Mina Golestani, Homayoun Sadeghi-bazargani, Sepideh Harzand-Jadidi, Hamid Soori
    BMC Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Transforming the “SEAD”: Evaluation of a Virtual Surgical Exploration and Discovery Program and its Effects on Career Decision-Making
    Kameela Miriam Alibhai, Patricia Burhunduli, Christopher Tarzi, Kush Patel, Christine Seabrook, Tim Brandys
    Journal of Surgical Education.2023; 80(2): 256.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of the effectiveness of a training programme for nurses regarding augmentative and alternative communication with intubated patients using Kirkpatrick's model: A pilot study
    Marzieh Momennasab, Fatemeh Mohammadi, Fereshteh DehghanRad, Azita Jaberi
    Nursing Open.2023; 10(5): 2895.     CrossRef
  • Outcome Evaluation of a Transnational Postgraduate Capacity-Building Program Using the Objective Structured Clinical Examination
    Kye-Yeung Park, Hoon-Ki Park, Jwa-Seop Shin, Taejong Kim, Youngjoo Jung, Min Young Seo, Ketsomsouk Bouphavanh, Sourideth Sengchanh, Ketmany Inthachack
    Evaluation Review.2023; 47(4): 680.     CrossRef
  • Developing a capacity building training model for public health managers of low and middle income countries
    Kritika Upadhyay, Sonu Goel, Preethi John, Sara Rubinelli
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(4): e0272793.     CrossRef
  • Implementation and evaluation of crowdsourcing in global health education
    Huanle Cai, Huiqiong Zheng, Jinghua Li, Chun Hao, Jing Gu, Jing Liao, Yuantao Hao
    Global Health Research and Policy.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • An Evaluation of the Surgical Foundations Curriculum: A National Study
    Ekaterina Kouzmina, Stephen Mann, Timothy Chaplin, Boris Zevin
    Journal of Surgical Education.2021; 78(3): 914.     CrossRef
  • Surgical data strengthening in Ethiopia: results of a Kirkpatrick framework evaluation of a data quality intervention
    Sehrish Bari, Joseph Incorvia, Katherine R. Iverson, Abebe Bekele, Kaya Garringer, Olivia Ahearn, Laura Drown, Amanu Aragaw Emiru, Daniel Burssa, Samson Workineh, Ephrem Daniel Sheferaw, John G. Meara, Andualem Beyene
    Global Health Action.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of a Neonatal Resuscitation Training Programme for Healthcare Professionals in Zanzibar, Tanzania: A Pre-post Intervention Study
    Xiang Ding, Li Wang, Mwinyi I. Msellem, Yaojia Hu, Jun Qiu, Shiying Liu, Mi Zhang, Lihui Zhu, Jos M. Latour
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Portfolios with Evidence of Reflective Practice Required by Regulatory Bodies: An Integrative Review
    Marco Zaccagnini, Patricia A. Miller
    Physiotherapy Canada.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of a training program on primary eye care for an Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA) in an urban district
    Pallavi Shukla, Praveen Vashist, SurajSingh Senjam, Vivek Gupta
    Indian Journal of Ophthalmology.2020; 68(2): 356.     CrossRef
  • Micro-feedback skills workshop impacts perceptions and practices of doctoral faculty
    Najma Baseer, James Degnan, Mandy Moffat, Usman Mahboob
    BMC Medical Education.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Residents working with Médecins Sans Frontières: training and pilot evaluation
    Alba Ripoll-Gallardo, Luca Ragazzoni, Ettore Mazzanti, Grazia Meneghetti, Jeffrey Michael Franc, Alessandro Costa, Francesco della Corte
    Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Medical education in Laos
    Timothy Alan Wittick, Ketsomsouk Bouphavanh, Vannyda Namvongsa, Amphay Khounthep, Amy Gray
    Medical Teacher.2019; 41(8): 877.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of the effectiveness of a first aid health volunteers’ training programme using Kirkpatrick’s model: A pilot study
    Fatemeh Vizeshfar, Marzieh Momennasab, Shahrzad Yektatalab, Mohamad Taghi Iman
    Health Education Journal.2018; 77(2): 190.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of a consulting training course for international development assistance for health
    Pan Gao, Hao Xiang, Suyang Liu, Yisi Liu, Shengjie Dong, Feifei Liu, Wenyuan Yu, Xiangyu Li, Li Guan, Yuanyuan Chu, Zongfu Mao, Shu Chen, Shenglan Tang
    BMC Medical Education.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Empowering the Filipino Physician through Continuing Professional Development in the Philippines: Gearing towards ASEAN Harmonization and Globalization
    Maria Minerva P Calimag
    Journal of Medicine, University of Santo Tomas.2018; 2(1): 121.     CrossRef
Small group effectiveness in a Caribbean medical school’s problem-based learning sessions  
P Ravi Shankar, Atanu Nandy, Ramanan Balasubramanium, Soumitra Chakravarty
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:5.   Published online March 24, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.5
  • 65,535 View
  • 189 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The tutorial group effectiveness instrument was developed to provide objective information on the effectiveness of small groups. Student perception of small group effectiveness during the PBL process has not been previously studied in Xavier University School of Medicine. Hence the present study was carried out.
Methods
The study was conducted among the second and third semester undergraduate medical students during the last week of September 2013, in Xavier University School of Medicine, Aruba, Kingdom of the Netherlands. Students were informed about the objectives of the study and invited to participate after obtaining written, informed consent. Demographic information like gender, age, nationality and whether the respondent had been exposed to PBL before joining the institution were noted. Student perception about small group effectiveness was studied by noting their degree of agreement with a set of 19 statements using a Likert type scale.
Results
Thirty four of the 37 (91.9%) second and third semester medical students participated in the study. The mean cognitive score was 3.76 while the mean motivational and demotivational scores were 3.65 and 2.51 respectively. The median cognitive category score was 27 (maximum score 35) while the motivation score was 26 (maximum score 35) and the demotivational score was 12 (maximum being 25). There was no significant difference in scores according to respondents’ demographic characteristics.
Conclusion
Student perception about small group effectiveness was positive. Since most medical schools all over the world already have or are introducing PBL as a learning modality, Tutorial Group Effectiveness Instrument can provide valuable information about small group functioning during PBL sessions.

Citations

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  • Relationship of Prior Knowledge and Scenario Quality With the Effectiveness of Problem-based Learning Discussion among Medical Students of Universitas Malikussaleh, Aceh, Indonesia
    Mulyati Sri Rahayu, Sri Wahyuni, Yuziani Yuziani
    Malaysian Journal of Medicine and Health Sciences.2023; 19(4): 15.     CrossRef
  • Should the PBL tutor be present? A cross-sectional study of group effectiveness in synchronous and asynchronous settings
    Samuel Edelbring, Siw Alehagen, Evalotte Mörelius, AnnaKarin Johansson, Patrik Rytterström
    BMC Medical Education.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Initiating small group learning in a Caribbean medical school
    P. Ravi Shankar
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2015; 12: 10.     CrossRef
  • Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas na Graduação Médica – Uma Revisão da Literatura Atual
    Luciana Brosina de Leon, Fernanda de Quadros Onófrio
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2015; 39(4): 614.     CrossRef
  • Assessing the Effectiveness of Problem-Based Learning of Preventive Medicine Education in China
    Xiaojie Ding, Liping Zhao, Haiyan Chu, Na Tong, Chunhui Ni, Zhibin Hu, Zhengdong Zhang, Meilin Wang
    Scientific Reports.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
Brief Report
Program Evaluation in Medical Education: An Overview of the Utilization-focused Approach
Matt Vassar, Denna L. Wheeler, Machelle Davison, Johnathan Franklin
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2010;7:1.   Published online June 15, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2010.7.1
  • 28,996 View
  • 265 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Medical school administrators, educators, and other key personnel must often make difficult choices regarding the creation, retention, modification, or termination of the various programs that take place at their institutions. Program evaluation is a data-driven strategy to aide decision-makers in determining the most appropriate outcome for programs within their purview. The purpose of this brief article is to describe one program evaluation model, the utilization-focused approach. In particular, we address the focus of this model, the personal factor, the role of the evaluator, and the evaluation process. Based on the flexibility of this model as well as its focus on stakeholder involvement, we encourage readers to consider the utilization-focused approach when evaluating programs.

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  • Teaching and Facilitation Course for Family as Faculty: Preparing Families to be Faculty Partners in Healthcare Education
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  • Pandemi Döneminde Tıp Eğitimini Sürdürmek: Giresun Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi Deneyimi
    Hülya AKAN, Berkan ŞAHİN, Murat USTA, Özkan ÖZAY, Hakan YÜZÜAK, Ural OĞUZ
    Tıp Eğitimi Dünyası.2021; 20(60-1): 54.     CrossRef
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    Penelope J Slater, Caroline J Osborne, Anthony R Herbert
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    Medical Teacher.2012; 34(10): 783.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions