Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
20 "Personal satisfaction"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Research articles
Factors influencing the learning transfer of nursing students in a non-face-to-face educational environment during the COVID-19 pandemic in Korea: a cross-sectional study using structural equation modeling  
Geun Myun Kim, Yunsoo Kim, Seong Kwang Kim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:14.   Published online April 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.14
  • 1,769 View
  • 153 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing the learning transfer of nursing students in a non-face-to-face educational environment through structural equation modeling and suggest ways to improve the transfer of learning.
Methods
In this cross-sectional study, data were collected via online surveys from February 9 to March 1, 2022, from 218 nursing students in Korea. Learning transfer, learning immersion, learning satisfaction, learning efficacy, self-directed learning ability and information technology utilization ability were analyzed using IBM SPSS for Windows ver. 22.0 and AMOS ver. 22.0.
Results
The assessment of structural equation modeling showed adequate model fit, with normed χ2=1.74 (P<0.024), goodness-of-fit index=0.97, adjusted goodness-of-fit index=0.93, comparative fit index=0.98, root mean square residual=0.02, Tucker-Lewis index=0.97, normed fit index=0.96, and root mean square error of approximation=0.06. In a hypothetical model analysis, 9 out of 11 pathways of the hypothetical structural model for learning transfer in nursing students were statistically significant. Learning self-efficacy and learning immersion of nursing students directly affected learning transfer, and subjective information technology utilization ability, self-directed learning ability, and learning satisfaction were variables with indirect effects. The explanatory power of immersion, satisfaction, and self-efficacy for learning transfer was 44.4%.
Conclusion
The assessment of structural equation modeling indicated an acceptable fit. It is necessary to improve the transfer of learning through the development of a self-directed program for learning ability improvement, including the use of information technology in nursing students’ learning environment in non-face-to-face conditions.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Flow in Relation to Academic Achievement in Online-Learning: A Meta-Analysis Study
    Da Xing, Yunjung Lee, Gyun Heo
    Measurement: Interdisciplinary Research and Perspectives.2024; : 1.     CrossRef
  • The Mediating Effect of Perceived Institutional Support on Inclusive Leadership and Academic Loyalty in Higher Education
    Olabode Gbobaniyi, Shalini Srivastava, Abiodun Kolawole Oyetunji, Chiemela Victor Amaechi, Salmia Binti Beddu, Bajpai Ankita
    Sustainability.2023; 15(17): 13195.     CrossRef
  • Transfer of Learning of New Nursing Professionals: Exploring Patterns and the Effect of Previous Work Experience
    Helena Roig-Ester, Paulina Elizabeth Robalino Guerra, Carla Quesada-Pallarès, Andreas Gegenfurtner
    Education Sciences.2023; 14(1): 52.     CrossRef
Improvement of the clinical skills of nurse anesthesia students using mini-clinical evaluation exercises in Iran: a randomized controlled study  
Ali Khalafi, Yasamin Sharbatdar, Nasrin Khajeali, Mohammad Hosein Haghighizadeh, Mahshid Vaziri
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:12.   Published online April 6, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.12
  • 2,524 View
  • 120 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The present study aimed to investigate the effect of a mini-clinical evaluation exercise (CEX) assessment on improving the clinical skills of nurse anesthesia students at Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.
Methods
This study started on November 1, 2022, and ended on December 1, 2022. It was conducted among 50 nurse anesthesia students divided into intervention and control groups. The intervention group’s clinical skills were evaluated 4 times using the mini-CEX method. In contrast, the same skills were evaluated in the control group based on the conventional method—that is, general supervision by the instructor during the internship and a summative evaluation based on a checklist at the end of the course. The intervention group students also filled out a questionnaire to measure their satisfaction with the mini-CEX method.
Results
The mean score of the students in both the control and intervention groups increased significantly on the post-test (P<0.0001), but the improvement in the scores of the intervention group was significantly greater compared with the control group (P<0.0001). The overall mean score for satisfaction in the intervention group was 76.3 out of a maximum of 95.
Conclusion
The findings of this study showed that using mini-CEX as a formative evaluation method to evaluate clinical skills had a significant effect on the improvement of nurse anesthesia students’ clinical skills, and they had a very favorable opinion about this evaluation method.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Psychometric testing of anesthesia nursing competence scale (AnestComp)
    Samira Mahmoudi, Akram Yazdani, Fatemeh Hasanshiri
    Perioperative Care and Operating Room Management.2024; 34: 100368.     CrossRef
  • Application of flipped classroom teaching method based on ADDIE concept in clinical teaching for neurology residents
    Juan Zhang, Hong Chen, Xie Wang, Xiaofeng Huang, Daojun Xie
    BMC Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparing Satisfaction of Undergraduate Nursing Students`: Mini-CEX vs CIM in Assessing Clinical Competence
    Somia Saghir, Anny Ashiq Ali, Kashif Khan, Uzma Bibi, Shafaat Ullah, Rafi Ullah, Zaifullah Khan, Tahir Khan
    Pakistan Journal of Health Sciences.2023; : 134.     CrossRef
  • Enhancement of the technical and non-technical skills of nurse anesthesia students using the Anesthetic List Management Assessment Tool in Iran: a quasi-experimental study
    Ali Khalafi, Maedeh Kordnejad, Vahid Saidkhani
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2023; 20: 19.     CrossRef
What impacts students’ satisfaction the most from Medicine Student Experience Questionnaire in Australia: a validity study  
Pin-Hsiang Huang, Gary Velan, Greg Smith, Melanie Fentoullis, Sean Edward Kennedy, Karen Jane Gibson, Kerry Uebel, Boaz Shulruf
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:2.   Published online January 18, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.2
  • 1,795 View
  • 136 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study evaluated the validity of student feedback derived from Medicine Student Experience Questionnaire (MedSEQ), as well as the predictors of students’ satisfaction in the Medicine program.
Methods
Data from MedSEQ applying to the University of New South Wales Medicine program in 2017, 2019, and 2021 were analyzed. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Cronbach’s α were used to assess the construct validity and reliability of MedSEQ respectively. Hierarchical multiple linear regressions were used to identify the factors that most impact students’ overall satisfaction with the program.
Results
A total of 1,719 students (34.50%) responded to MedSEQ. CFA showed good fit indices (root mean square error of approximation=0.051; comparative fit index=0.939; chi-square/degrees of freedom=6.429). All factors yielded good (α>0.7) or very good (α>0.8) levels of reliability, except the “online resources” factor, which had acceptable reliability (α=0.687). A multiple linear regression model with only demographic characteristics explained 3.8% of the variance in students’ overall satisfaction, whereas the model adding 8 domains from MedSEQ explained 40%, indicating that 36.2% of the variance was attributable to students’ experience across the 8 domains. Three domains had the strongest impact on overall satisfaction: “being cared for,” “satisfaction with teaching,” and “satisfaction with assessment” (β=0.327, 0.148, 0.148, respectively; all with P<0.001).
Conclusion
MedSEQ has good construct validity and high reliability, reflecting students’ satisfaction with the Medicine program. Key factors impacting students’ satisfaction are the perception of being cared for, quality teaching irrespective of the mode of delivery and fair assessment tasks which enhance learning.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Mental health and quality of life across 6 years of medical training: A year-by-year analysis
    Natalia de Castro Pecci Maddalena, Alessandra Lamas Granero Lucchetti, Ivana Lucia Damasio Moutinho, Oscarina da Silva Ezequiel, Giancarlo Lucchetti
    International Journal of Social Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Review
Medical students’ satisfaction level with e-learning during the COVID-19 pandemic and its related factors: a systematic review  
Mahbubeh Tabatabaeichehr, Samane Babaei, Mahdieh Dartomi, Peiman Alesheikh, Amir Tabatabaee, Hamed Mortazavi, Zohreh Khoshgoftar
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:37.   Published online December 20, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.37
  • 2,819 View
  • 223 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This review investigated medical students’ satisfaction level with e-learning during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and its related factors.
Methods
A comprehensive systematic search was performed of international literature databases, including Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, and Persian databases such as Iranmedex and Scientific Information Database using keywords extracted from Medical Subject Headings such as “Distance learning,” “Distance education,” “Online learning,” “Online education,” and “COVID-19” from the earliest date to July 10, 2022. The quality of the studies included in this review was evaluated using the appraisal tool for cross-sectional studies (AXIS tool).
Results
A total of 15,473 medical science students were enrolled in 24 studies. The level of satisfaction with e-learning during the COVID-19 pandemic among medical science students was 51.8%. Factors such as age, gender, clinical year, experience with e-learning before COVID-19, level of study, adaptation content of course materials, interactivity, understanding of the content, active participation of the instructor in the discussion, multimedia use in teaching sessions, adequate time dedicated to the e-learning, stress perception, and convenience had significant relationships with the satisfaction of medical students with e-learning during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Conclusion
Therefore, due to the inevitability of online education and e-learning, it is suggested that educational managers and policymakers choose the best online education method for medical students by examining various studies in this field to increase their satisfaction with e-learning.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Factors affecting medical students’ satisfaction with online learning: a regression analysis of a survey
    Özlem Serpil Çakmakkaya, Elif Güzel Meydanlı, Ali Metin Kafadar, Mehmet Selman Demirci, Öner Süzer, Muhlis Cem Ar, Muhittin Onur Yaman, Kaan Can Demirbaş, Mustafa Sait Gönen
    BMC Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A comparative study on the effectiveness of online and in-class team-based learning on student performance and perceptions in virtual simulation experiments
    Jing Shen, Hongyan Qi, Ruhuan Mei, Cencen Sun
    BMC Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Pharmacy Students’ Attitudes Toward Distance Learning After the COVID-19 Pandemic: Cross-Sectional Study From Saudi Arabia
    Saud Alsahali, Salman Almutairi, Salem Almutairi, Saleh Almofadhi, Mohammed Anaam, Mohammed Alshammari, Suhaj Abdulsalim, Yasser Almogbel
    JMIR Formative Research.2024; 8: e54500.     CrossRef
  • Effects of the First Wave of the COVID-19 Pandemic on the Work Readiness of Undergraduate Nursing Students in China: A Mixed-Methods Study
    Lifang He, Jean Rizza Dela Cruz
    Risk Management and Healthcare Policy.2024; Volume 17: 559.     CrossRef
  • Physician Assistant Students’ Perception of Online Didactic Education: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Daniel L Anderson, Jeffrey L Alexander
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mediating Role of PERMA Wellbeing in the Relationship between Insomnia and Psychological Distress among Nursing College Students
    Qian Sun, Xiangyu Zhao, Yiming Gao, Di Zhao, Meiling Qi
    Behavioral Sciences.2023; 13(9): 764.     CrossRef
Research article
Factors affecting nursing and health technician students' satisfaction with distance learning during the COVID-19 pandemic in Morocco: a descriptive study  
Aziz Naciri, Mohamed Radid, Abderrahmane Achbani, Mohamed Amine Baba, Ahmed Kharbach, Ghizlane Chemsi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:28.   Published online October 17, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.28
  • 2,801 View
  • 247 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Distance learning describes any learning based on the use of new multimedia technologies and the internet to allow students to acquire new knowledge and skills at a distance. This study aimed to determine satisfaction levels with distance learning and associated factors among nursing and health technician students during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic in Morocco.
Methods
An descriptive study was conducted between April and June 2022 among nursing and health technician students using a self-administered instrument. The student satisfaction questionnaire consists of 24 questions categorized into 6 subscales: instructor, technology, course setup, interaction, outcomes, and overall satisfaction. It was based on a 5-point Likert scale, ranging from 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with student satisfaction during distance learning.
Results
A total of 330 students participated in this study, and 176 students (53.3%) were satisfied with the distance learning activities. A mean score higher than 2.8 out of 5 was obtained for all subscales. Multiple regression analysis showed that students’ year of study (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28–4.27) and internet quality (aOR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.29–0.77) were the significant factors associated with students’ satisfaction during distance learning.
Conclusion
This study highlights the satisfaction level of students and factors that influenced it during distance learning. A thorough understanding of student satisfaction with digital environments will contribute to the successful implementation of distance learning devices in nursing.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Satisfaction with online education among students, faculty, and parents before and after the COVID-19 outbreak: Evidence from a meta-analysis
    Tianyuan Xu, Ling Xue
    Frontiers in Psychology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Educational/Faculty development material
Environmental management education using immersive virtual reality in asthmatic children in Korea: a randomized controlled study (secondary publication)  
Seung Hyun Kim, Sang Hyun Park, Insoon Kang, Yuyoung Song, Jaehoon Lim, Wonsuck Yoon, Young Yoo
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:15.   Published online July 11, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.15
  • 8,289 View
  • 262 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Awareness of environmental control is considered a significant influence on the performance of asthma self-management behaviors, which are involved in maintaining effective asthma control. This study aimed to investigate whether immersive virtual reality (VR) education is effective in environmental control education for asthmatic children in Korea. Thirty asthmatic children aged 9 to 13 years with aeroallergen sensitization were enrolled. Environmental control education for asthmatic participants was performed using immersive VR (VR group) or conventional leaflets provided by asthma specialists (control group). Five questionnaires, on awareness of environmental control, memory, assessment of intent to act, a satisfaction test, and an Asthma Control Test (ACT), were used to estimate the effects of education. The scores for awareness of environmental control, memory, and intent to act significantly increased after education in both groups, and the scores remained high until 4 weeks after education. Both groups’ ACT scores were consistently high before and 4 weeks after education. Satisfaction scores were very high in the VR group. The increased scores in awareness of environmental control and intent to act indicate that the environmental control education using VR is worthy of attention as an effective educational tool for asthma management. Further developed techniques, including active environmental interventions by participants in VR, could be applied to effective asthma management.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials on Virtual Reality Application in Pediatric Patients
    Ashish Varma, Waqar M Naqvi, Salima Mulla, Samana Syed, Sumit Thakur, Sakshi P Arora, Anuj R Varma, Smruti Besekar
    Cureus.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Medical students’ self-assessed efficacy and satisfaction with training on endotracheal intubation and central venous catheterization with smart glasses in Taiwan: a non-equivalent control-group pre- and post-test study
    Yu-Fan Lin, Chien-Ying Wang, Yen-Hsun Huang, Sheng-Min Lin, Ying-Ying Yang
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 25.     CrossRef
Research articles
Obstetrics and gynecology residents’ satisfaction and self-confidence after an anal sphincter injury simulation-based workshop in Indonesia: a pre- and post-intervention comparison study  
Riska Wahyuningtyas, Eighty Mardiyan Kurniawati, Budi Utomo, Gatut Hardianto, Hari Paraton, Tri Hastono, Djoko Kuswanto
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:4.   Published online February 14, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.4
  • 5,037 View
  • 447 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Obstetric anal sphincter injury is one of the most common complications during delivery. Simulation models with manikins can be used as an effective medical learning method to improve students’ abilities before encountering patients. The present study aimed to describe the development of an anal sphincter injury model and to assess residents’ satisfaction and self-confidence after a perineal repair workshop with an anal sphincter injury simulator in Indonesia.
Methods
This was a cross-sectional study with evaluation of outcomes before and after the workshop. We created a silicone-latex simulation anal sphincter injury model. Then, we validated this simulation and used it as a simulation model for the workshop. We asked residents about their satisfaction with repairing anal sphincter injuries using a simulation model and residents’ self-confidence when practicing anal sphincter injury repair.
Results
All residents felt the simulation-based workshop was valuable (100%). Most of the scores for the similarity of the simulation model were good (about 8 out of maximum 10). The self-assessment of confidence was measured before and after the workshop. Overall self-confidence increased significantly after the workshop in identifying the external sphincter ani (EAS) (P=0.031), suturing the anal mucosa (P=0.001), suturing the internal sphincter ani (P=0.001), suturing the EAS (P<0.001), and evaluating the sphincter ani tone (P=0.016).
Conclusion
The anal sphincter injury simulator improved residents’ self-confidence in identifying the EAS, suturing the anal mucosa, suturing the internal sphincter ani, suturing the EAS, and evaluating sphincter ani tone.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Objective structured assessment of medical students’ technical skills in second-degree perineal laceration repair with sponge model-based training
    Gregor Leonhard Olmes, Merle Doerk, Erich-Franz Solomayer, Meletios P. Nigdelis, Romina-Marina Sima, Bashar Haj Hamoud
    Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
No difference in learning outcomes and usability between using controllers and hand tracking during a virtual reality endotracheal intubation training for medical students in Thailand  
Chaowanan Khundam, Naparat Sukkriang, Frédéric Noël
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:22.   Published online August 18, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.22
  • 5,598 View
  • 355 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
We developed a virtual reality (VR) endotracheal intubation training that applied 2 interaction modalities (hand-tracking or controllersIt aimed to investigatedthe differences of usuability between using hand tracking and controllers during the VR intervention for intubation training for medical students from February 2021 to March 2021 in Thailand.
Methods
Forty-five participants were divided into 3 groups: video only, video with VR controller training, and video with VR hand tracking training. Pre-test, post-test, and practice scores were used to assess learning outcomes. The System Usability Scale (SUS) and User Satisfaction Evaluation Questionnaire (USEQ) questionnaires were used to evaluate the differences between the VR groups. The sample comprised 45 medical students (undergraduate) who were taking part in clinical training at Walailak University in Thailand.
Results
The overall learning outcomes of both VR groups were better than those of the video group. The post-test scores (P=0.581) and practice scores (P=0.168) of both VR groups were not significantly different. Similarly, no significant between-group differences were found in the SUS scores (P=0.588) or in any aspects of the USEQ scores.
Conclusion
VR enhanced medical training. Interactions using hand tracking or controllers were not significantly different in terms of the outcomes measured in this study. The results and interviews provided a better understanding of support learning and training, which will be further improved and developed to create a self-learning VR medical training system in the future.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Do Cone Beam CT Picture Archiving and Communication Systems Viewer Interfaces Meet the Expectations of Dental Professionals From a Usability Perspective?
    Yaren Dogan, Yigit Sirin
    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Virtual reality and augmented reality in medical education: an umbrella review
    Talia Tene, Diego Fabián Vique López, Paulina Elizabeth Valverde Aguirre, Luz María Orna Puente, Cristian Vacacela Gomez
    Frontiers in Digital Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Development of neonatal Apgar scoring training program utilizing contactless hand tracking in immersive virtual reality
    Sun-Yi Yang, Yun-Hee Oh
    Nurse Education Today.2024; 140: 106294.     CrossRef
  • Influence of Hand Tracking in Immersive Virtual Reality for Memory Assessment
    José Varela-Aldás, Jorge Buele, Irene López, Guillermo Palacios-Navarro
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2023; 20(5): 4609.     CrossRef
  • AR/VR Teaching-Learning Experiences in Higher Education Institutions (HEI): A Systematic Literature Review
    Belen Bermejo, Carlos Juiz, David Cortes, Jeroen Oskam, Teemu Moilanen, Jouko Loijas, Praneschen Govender, Jennifer Hussey, Alexander Lennart Schmidt, Ralf Burbach, Daniel King, Colin O'Connor, Davin Dunlea
    Informatics.2023; 10(2): 45.     CrossRef
  • Application and challenges of a metaverse in medicine
    Yingshu Wang, Congcong Li, Lai Qu, Hongfei Cai, Yingying Ge
    Frontiers in Robotics and AI.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Application of computer-based testing in the Korean Medical Licensing Examination, the emergence of the metaverse in medical education, journal metrics and statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 2.     CrossRef
  • Virtual Simulation in Undergraduate Medical Education: A Scoping Review of Recent Practice
    Qingming Wu, Yubin Wang, Lili Lu, Yong Chen, Hui Long, Jun Wang
    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
The relationships of nursing students’ satisfaction and self-confidence after a simulation-based course with their self-confidence while practicing on real patients in Vietnam  
Tran Thi Hoang Oanh, Nguyen Thi Yen Hoai, Pham Thi Thuy
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:16.   Published online July 30, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.16
  • 6,164 View
  • 417 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Simulation teaching refers to the replication of real-life scenarios, enabling students to practice nursing skills and learn actively in a safe environment. It also helps students control their anxiety and fears when caring for real patients. This study investigated the relationships of Vietnamese nursing students’ self-confidence in clinical practice with their satisfaction and self-confidence in simulation-based practice.
Methods
This cross-sectional descriptive study included 182 nursing students. The data collection included 2 separate stages with 2 main questionnaires. The Student Satisfaction and Self‐Confidence in Learning Scale was used to measure students’ satisfaction and self‐confidence after learning in the simulation room. The Confidence Scale was used to measure students’ self-confidence when first performing techniques on actual patients. Data were analyzed by descriptive and Pearson correlation statistics.
Results
Students’ satisfaction and self-confidence during the simulation course were quite high (mean±standard deviation [SD], 4.06±0.48 and 4.11±0.46 out of 5.0, respectively). In contrast, their confidence when first practicing on a patient was moderate (mean±SD, 3.19±0.62 out of 5.0). Students’ satisfaction showed moderate and weak positive correlations with self-confidence in pre-clinical practice and in clinical practice (r=0.33, P<0.001 and r=0.26, P<0.001, respectively).
Conclusion
Simulation has become an effective teaching strategy that can help nursing students be well-prepared for clinical placements in Vietnam. An effective nursing education strategy is needed to enhance the satisfaction and self-confidence of nursing students in simulation and then in clinical practice to help achieve professional engagement and development.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Construção e validação de guia de habilidade para autoaprendizagem: preparo e administração de medicamentos
    Ana Cristina Tripoloni, Carla Roberta Monteiro Miura, Tânia Arena Moreira Domingues, Juliana de Lima Lopes, Ruth Ester Assayag Batista
    Caderno Pedagógico.2024; 21(4): e3835.     CrossRef
  • Assessing satisfaction in simulation among nursing students: psychometric properties of the Satisfaction with Simulation Experience - Italian Version scale
    Sara Alberti, Massimo Guasconi, Marina Bolzoni, Giulia Donnini, Paola Volpi, Sergio Rovesti, Federico Monaco, Antonio Bonacaro, Paola Ferri
    BMC Nursing.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The effect of students’ online learning experience on their satisfaction during the COVID-19 pandemic: The mediating role of preference
    Xinchao Li, Flavian Adhiambo Odhiambo, Dickson Kofi Wiredu Ocansey
    Frontiers in Psychology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Critical Thinking Disposition and Influencing Factors Among New Graduate Nurses
    Hsiao-Ling Wu, Der-Fa Lu, Pei-Kwei Tsay
    The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing.2023; 54(5): 233.     CrossRef
  • Effect of video on satisfaction and self-confidence in simulation training: a randomized clinical trial
    Lissette Lucrecia Monge Abarca, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite de Barros, Rui Carlos Negrão Baptista, Ruth Ester Assayag Batista, Juliana de Lima Lopes
    Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Efeito do vídeo na satisfação e autoconfiança no treinamento por simulação: estudo clínico randomizado
    Lissette Lucrecia Monge Abarca, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite de Barros, Rui Carlos Negrão Baptista, Ruth Ester Assayag Batista, Juliana de Lima Lopes
    Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of High-Fidelity Simulation on Self-Satisfaction and Self-Confidence Among Nursing Students
    Dalia Toqan, Ahmad Ayed, Inaam A. Khalaf, Mohammad Alsadi
    SAGE Open Nursing.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The effect of home visit simulation on emotional intelligence, self-efficacy, empowerment, and stress in nursing students. A single group pre-post intervention study
    Maria Dolores Ruiz-Fernández, Andrea Alcaraz-Córdoba, Maria Mar López-Rodríguez, Cayetano Fernández-Sola, Jose Granero-Molina, Jose Manuel Hernández-Padilla
    Nurse Education Today.2022; 117: 105487.     CrossRef
Changes in the working conditions and learning environment of medical residents after the enactment of the Medical Resident Act in Korea in 2015: a national 4-year longitudinal study  
Sangho Sohn, Yeonjoo Seo, Yunsik Jeong, Seungwoo Lee, Jeesun Lee, Kyung Ju Lee
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:7.   Published online April 20, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.7
  • 6,428 View
  • 297 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
In 2015, the South Korean government legislated the Act for the Improvement of Training Conditions and Status of Medical Residents (Medical Resident Act). This study investigated changes in the working and learning environment pre- and post-implementation of the Medical Resident Act in 2017, as well as changes in training conditions by year post-implementation.
Methods
An annual cross-sectional voluntary survey was conducted by the Korean Intern Resident Association (KIRA) between 2016 and 2019. The learning and working environment, including extended shift length, rest time, learning goals, and job satisfaction, were compared by institution type, training year, and specialty.
Results
Of the 55,727 enrollees in the KIRA, 15,029 trainees took the survey, and the number of survey participants increased year by year (from 2,984 in 2016 to 4,700 in 2019). Overall working hours tended to decrease; however, interns worked the most (114 hours in 2016, 88 hours in 2019; P<0.001). Having 10 hours or more of break time has gradually become more common (P<0.001). Lunch breaks per week decreased from 5 in 2017 to 4 in 2019 (P<0.001). Trainees’ sense of educational deprivation due to physician assistants increased from 17.5% in 2016 to 25.6% in 2018 (P<0.001). Awareness of tasks and program/work achievement goals increased from 29.2% in 2016 to 58.3% in 2018 (P<0.001). Satisfaction with the learning environment increased over time, whereas satisfaction with working conditions varied.
Conclusion
The Medical Resident Act has brought promising changes to the training of medical residents in Korea, as well as their satisfaction with the training environment.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Developing and Establishing a Wound Dressing Team: Experience and Recommendations
    Sik Namgoong, Seunghee Baik, Seung-Kyu Han, Ji-Won Son, Jae-Yeon Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The effects of resident work hours on well‐being, performance, and education: A review from a Japanese perspective
    Kazuya Nagasaki, Hiroyuki Kobayashi
    Journal of General and Family Medicine.2023; 24(6): 323.     CrossRef
  • Developing prompts from large language model for extracting clinical information from pathology and ultrasound reports in breast cancer
    Hyeon Seok Choi, Jun Yeong Song, Kyung Hwan Shin, Ji Hyun Chang, Bum-Sup Jang
    Radiation Oncology Journal.2023; 41(3): 209.     CrossRef
  • Shortening shift’s length—Should we ask the residents if this is what they want?
    Yehuda Hershkovitz, Adi Rasco, Orna Tal, David C. Mohr
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(8): e0272548.     CrossRef
  • The Number of Monthly Night Shift Days and Depression Were Associated with an Increased Risk of Excessive Daytime Sleepiness in Emergency Physicians in South Korea
    Song Yi Park, Hyung Min Lee, Jiyoung Kim
    Behavioral Sciences.2022; 12(8): 279.     CrossRef
How dental students’ course experiences and satisfaction of their basic psychological needs influence passion for studying in Chile  
Cesar Orsini, Jorge Tricio, Doris Tapia, Cristina Segura
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:37.   Published online November 29, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.37
  • 8,843 View
  • 247 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to determine how the general course experiences of dental students in Chile and the satisfaction or frustration of their basic psychological needs influenced their passion for studying, and how passion influenced students’ study strategies.
Methods
A correlational cross-sectional study was conducted at 3 Chilean dental schools between April and June 2018, in which 935 undergraduate students participated. Students responded to Spanish-language versions of 4 psychological scale tools: the Course Experience Questionnaire, the Basic Psychological Needs Satisfac¬tion and Frustration Scale, the Passion Scale, and the Revised Study Process Questionnaire. Data were analysed with bivariate correlations and structural equation modelling, controlling for age, gender, year of study, and type of university.
Results
Students’ general course experiences (i.e., good teaching, clear goals and standards, appropriate assessment, and appropriate workload) positively predicted basic need satisfaction and negatively predicted need frustration. Need satisfaction positively predicted passion in students, with stronger scores for harmonious passion. Basic need frustration positively predicted obsessive passion and negatively predicted harmonious passion. Harmonious passion positively predicted deep study strategies and negatively predicted surface study strategies, while obsessive passion positively predicted both deep and surface study strategies.
Conclusion
Dental students’ optimal course experiences positively influenced the satisfaction of their basic psychological needs, which favoured harmonious over obsessive passion. In turn, harmonious over obsessive passion positively influenced deep study strategies. Therefore, efforts should be made to provide course experiences that support students’ basic needs and harmonious passion for studying, both in classroom and chair-side teaching.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Medical student motivation in specialised contexts
    Stacey M. Frumm, Sam Brondfield
    The Clinical Teacher.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Relationship between Psychological Needs and Academic Self-Concept in Physical Education Pre-Service Teachers: A Mediation Analysis
    Antonio Granero-Gallegos, Ginés D. López-García, Antonio Baena-Extremera, Raúl Baños
    Sustainability.2023; 15(5): 4052.     CrossRef
  • Changes in basic psychological needs, passion, and well-being of first-semester graduate students
    Hannah S. Appleseth, Lara J. LaCaille, Rick A. LaCaille, Eric E. Hessler, Jennifer O. Liang
    Journal of American College Health.2023; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Job crafting and well-being among school principals: The role of basic psychological need satisfaction and frustration
    Hiroyuki Toyama, Katja Upadyaya, Katariina Salmela-Aro
    European Management Journal.2022; 40(5): 809.     CrossRef
A conceptual model for students’ satisfaction with team-based learning using partial least squares structural equation modelling in a faculty of life sciences, in the United Kingdom  
Andrea Manfrin, Bugewa Apampa, Prabha Parthasarathy
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:36.   Published online November 13, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.36
  • 9,938 View
  • 228 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Students’ satisfaction is an essential element in higher education. This study aimed to identify paths and predictive power of students’ satisfaction during team-based learning (TBL) activities in the faculty of life sciences using partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM).
Methods
In 2018–2019, at the University of Sussex (Falmer, UK), 180 life science students exposed to TBL were invited to participate in the study. Team-Based-Learning-Student-Assessment-Instrument was used. A conceptual model was developed for testing six hypotheses. H1: What was the effect of TBL on student satisfaction? H2: What was the effect of lectures on student satisfaction? H3: What was the effect of TBL on accountability? H4: What was the effect of lectures on accountability? H5: What was the effect of accountability on student satisfaction? H6: What were the in-sample and out-of-sample predictive power of the model? The analysis was conducted using the PLS-SEM approach.
Results
Ninety-nine students participated in the study giving a 55% response rate. Confirmatory tetrad analysis suggested a reflective model. Construct reliability, validity, average extracted variance, and discriminant validity were confirmed. All path coefficients were positive, and 5 were statistically significant (H1: β=0.587, P<0:001; H2: β=0.262, P<0.001; H3: β=0.532, P<0.001; H4: β=0.063, P=0.546; H5: β=0.200, P=0.002). The in-sample predictive power was weak for Accountability, (R2=0.303; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.117–0.428; P<0.001) and substantial for Student Satisfaction (R2=0.678; 95% CI, 0.498–0.777; P<0.001). The out-of-sample predictive power was moderate.
Conclusion
The results have demonstrated the possibility of developing and testing a TBL conceptual model using PLS-SEM for the evaluation of path coefficients and predictive power relative to students’ satisfaction.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The predictive power of electronic reporting system utilization on voluntary reporting of near-miss incidents among nurses: A PLS-SEM approach
    Mohammed Abdalraheem Alalaween, Noorliza Karia
    Belitung Nursing Journal.2024; 10(1): 15.     CrossRef
  • Psychometric properties of Clinical Learning Environment Inventory and its association with Moroccan nursing students’ satisfaction: A PLS-SEM approach
    Khadija Saka, Mohamed-Yassine Amarouch, Mohamed El Amine Ragala, Zarrouq Btissame, Adel Tahraoui, Youness El Achhab, Jaouad El-Hilaly
    Belitung Nursing Journal.2023; 9(1): 86.     CrossRef
  • The relationship between the pharmacist's role, patient understanding and satisfaction during the provision of a cost‐effective pharmacist‐led intervention
    Andrea Manfrin
    Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.2023; 29(5): 825.     CrossRef
  • Transitioning to Individual Learning Paths in the Opinions of Students and Teachers: the Case of the University of Tyumen
    Tatyana Gavrilyuk, Taisia Pogodaeva
    Sociological Journal.2023; 29(2): 51.     CrossRef
  • Equation Modelling of Automotive Textiles for Car Seat Covers in the Ghanaian Upholstery Industry
    Dr. Richard Selase Gbadegbe, Edem Kwami Buami, Charles Kumah, Bijou Asemsro, Prof. Maxwell Selase Akple
    International Journal of Innovative Technology and Exploring Engineering.2023; 12(12): 15.     CrossRef
  • Virtual Physical Education: Google Meet as an alternative platform for learning skill-based concepts
    Joseph Lobo
    Physical education of students.2022; 26(6): 296.     CrossRef
  • A SEM-NCA Approach towards Social Networks Marketing: Evaluating Consumers’ Sustainable Purchase Behavior with the Moderating Role of Eco-Friendly Attitude
    Pejman Ebrahimi, Datis Khajeheian, Maria Fekete-Farkas
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(24): 13276.     CrossRef
Dreyfus scale-based feedback increased medical students’ satisfaction with the complex cluster part of a interviewing and physical examination course and improved skills readiness in Taiwan  
Shiau-Shian Huang, Chia-Chang Huang, Ying-Ying Yang, Shuu-Jiun Wang, Boaz Shulruf, Chen-Huan Chen
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:30.   Published online October 11, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.30
  • 10,430 View
  • 127 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
In contrast to the core part of the clinical interviewing and physical examination (PE) skills course, corresponding to the basic, head-to-toe, and thoracic systems, learners need structured feedback in the cluster part of the course, which includes the abdominal, neuromuscular, and musculoskeletal systems. This study evaluated the effects of using Dreyfus scale-based feedback, which has elements of continuous professional development, instead of Likert scale-based feedback in the cluster part of training in Taiwan.
Methods
Instructors and final-year medical students in the 2015–2016 classes of National Yang-Ming University, Taiwan comprised the regular cohort, whereas those in the 2017–2018 classes formed the intervention cohort. In the intervention cohort, Dreyfus scale-based feedback, rather than Likert scale-based feedback, was used in the cluster part of the course.
Results
In the cluster part of the course in the regular cohort, pre-trained standardized patients rated the class climate as poor, and students expressed low satisfaction with the instructors and course and low self-assessed readiness. In comparison with the regular cohort, improved end-of-course group objective structured clinical examination scores after the cluster part were noted in the intervention cohort. In other words, the implementation of Dreyfus scale-based feedback in the intervention cohort for the cluster part improved the deficit in this section of the course.
Conclusion
The implementation of Dreyfus scale-based feedback helped instructors to create a good class climate in the cluster part of the clinical interviewing and PE skills course. Simultaneously, this new intervention achieved the goal of promoting medical students’ readiness for interviewing, PE, and self-directed learning.
The relationship of examinees’ individual characteristics and perceived acceptability of smart device-based testing to test scores on the practice test of the Korea Emergency Medicine Technician Licensing Examination  
Eun Young Lim, Mi Kyoung Yim, Sun Huh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:33.   Published online December 27, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.33
  • 19,236 View
  • 233 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Smart device-based testing (SBT) is being introduced into the Republic of Korea’s high-stakes examination system, starting with the Korean Emergency Medicine Technician Licensing Examination (KEMTLE) in December 2017. In order to minimize the effects of variation in examinees’ environment on test scores, this study aimed to identify any associations of variables related to examinees’ individual characteristics and their perceived acceptability of SBT with their SBT practice test scores.
Methods
Of the 569 candidate students who took the KEMTLE on September 12, 2015, 560 responded to a survey questionnaire on the acceptability of SBT after the examination. The questionnaire addressed 8 individual characteristics and contained 2 satisfaction, 9 convenience, and 9 preference items. A comparative analysis according to individual variables was performed. Furthermore, a generalized linear model (GLM) analysis was conducted to identify the effects of individual characteristics and perceived acceptability of SBT on test scores.
Results
Among those who preferred SBT over paper-and-pencil testing, test scores were higher for male participants (mean± standard deviation [SD], 4.36± 0.72) than for female participants (mean± SD, 4.21± 0.73). According to the GLM, no variables evaluated— including gender and experience with computer-based testing, SBT, or using a tablet PC—showed a statistically significant relationship with the total score, scores on multimedia items, or scores on text items.
Conclusion
Individual characteristics and perceived acceptability of SBT did not affect the SBT practice test scores of emergency medicine technician students in Korea. It should be possible to adopt SBT for the KEMTLE without interference from the variables examined in this study.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Application of computer-based testing in the Korean Medical Licensing Examination, the emergence of the metaverse in medical education, journal metrics and statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 2.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Student Satisfaction with Ubiquitous-Based Tests in Women’s Health Nursing Course
    Mi-Young An, Yun-Mi Kim
    Healthcare.2021; 9(12): 1664.     CrossRef
Motivational profiles and their relationships with basic psychological needs, academic performance, study strategies, self-esteem, and vitality in dental students in Chile  
Cesar A. Orsini, Vivian I. Binnie, Jorge A. Tricio
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:11.   Published online April 19, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.11
  • 37,705 View
  • 400 Download
  • 27 Web of Science
  • 24 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
To determine dental students’ motivational profiles through a person-centred approach and to analyse the associations with the satisfaction of their basic psychological needs, study strategies, academic performance, self-esteem, and vitality.
Methods
A total of 924 students from the University of San Sebastian (Chile) participated in this cross-sectional cor¬relational study in spring 2016. Data were collected through 5 self-reported instruments, in addition to students’ academic performance. The Cronbach alpha, descriptive statistics, and correla¬tion scores were computed. A k-means cluster analysis with intrinsic and controlled motivation was conducted to identify different mo-tivational profiles. Subsequently, multivariate analysis of covariance controlling for the effects of gender and year of study was carried out to assess differences among the retained motivational profiles and learning variables.
Results
All instruments showed acceptable Cronbach alpha scores. A 4-cluster solution was retained for the motivational profile over a 3- or 5-cluster solution. Students’ motiva-tional profiles were characterized by different degrees of intrinsic and controlled motivation. The high intrinsic motivation groups showed higher perceptions of their basic psychological, a greater propensity for a deep rather than surface study strategy, better academic performance, and higher scores for self-esteem and vitality than the low intrinsic motivation groups, regardless of the degree of controlled motivation.
Conclusion
Students with a high intrinsic motivation profile, regardless of their controlled motivation scores, reported better learning characteristics. Therefore, special attention should be paid to students’ motivational profiles, as the quality of motivation might serve as a basis for interventions to support their academic success and well-being.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Basic psychological needs and GRIT in Peruvian university students
    Nohemi Marcelo-Torres, Maria Pia Manyari-Masias, Raymundo Calderón-Sánchez, Veronica Tutte, Regina Brandão, Tomás Caycho-Rodríguez, Mario Reyes-Bossio
    Frontiers in Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Students’ Motivation for Honors Programs in the Netherlands
    Neha Basnet, Anouk Wouters, Rashmi A. Kusurkar
    SAGE Open.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Profiling learning strategies of medical students: A person‐centered approach
    Nils Otto, Anja Böckers, Thomas Shiozawa, Irene Brunk, Sven Schumann, Daniela Kugelmann, Markus Missler, Dogus Darici
    Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Why Do We Feel Like Intellectual Frauds? A Self-Determination Theory Perspective on the Impostor Phenomenon in Medical Students
    Adam Neufeld, Oksana Babenko, Hollis Lai, Clark Svrcek, Greg Malin
    Teaching and Learning in Medicine.2023; 35(2): 180.     CrossRef
  • The purpose, adaptability, confidence, and engrossment model: A novel approach for supporting professional trainees’ motivation, engagement, and academic achievement
    Adam G. Gavarkovs, Rashmi A. Kusurkar, Ryan Brydges
    Frontiers in Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The impact of community of inquiry and self-efficacy on student attitudes in sustained remote health professions learning environments
    Amanda K. Burbage, Yuane Jia, Thuha Hoang
    BMC Medical Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Modeling the Impact of Motivation Factors on Students’ Study Strategies and Performance Using Machine Learning
    Fidelia A. Orji, Julita Vassileva
    Journal of Educational Technology Systems.2023; 52(2): 274.     CrossRef
  • Examining the Influence of Self-Esteem and Digital Literacy on Professional Competence Factors in Dental Education: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Gulsum Ceylan, Melike Ozlem Eken, Selen Yuruk, Faruk Emir
    Applied Sciences.2023; 13(16): 9411.     CrossRef
  • Motivation to teach as a predictor of resilience and appreciation: An examination in terms of the self-determination theory
    Aylin Mentiş Köksoy, Mehmet Uğur Kutluer
    South African Journal of Education.2023; 43(2): 1.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of Life Goal Framing to Motivate Medical Students During Online Learning: A Randomized Controlled Trial
    Adam G. Gavarkovs, Jeff Crukley, Erin Miller, Rashmi A. Kusurkar, Kulamakan Kulasegaram, Ryan Brydges
    Perspectives on Medical Education.2023; 12(1): 444.     CrossRef
  • Self-Determination Theory SDT as educational and upbringing inspiration
    Urszula Oszwa, Tomasz Knopik
    Studia z Teorii Wychowania.2023; XIV(4 (45)): 165.     CrossRef
  • Motivational Design for Web-Based Instruction in Health Professions Education: Protocol for a Systematic Review and Directed Content Analysis
    Adam Gavarkovs, Rashmi A Kusurkar, Kulamakan Kulasegaram, Jeff Crukley, Erin Miller, Melanie Anderson, Ryan Brydges
    JMIR Research Protocols.2022; 11(11): e42681.     CrossRef
  • From Autonomy Support and Grit to Satisfaction With Life Through Self-Determined Motivation and Group Cohesion in Higher Education
    José Eduardo Lozano-Jiménez, Elisa Huéscar, Juan Antonio Moreno-Murcia
    Frontiers in Psychology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Analysis of perceptual, psychological, and behavioral factors that affect the academic performance of education university students.
    Ana Isabel Beltrán-Velasco, Macarena Donoso-González, Vicente Javier Clemente-Suárez
    Physiology & Behavior.2021; 238: 113497.     CrossRef
  • Exploring Factors Predicting Undergraduate Healthcare Students’ Use of Learning Strategies
    Linda Messineo, Crispino Tosto, Mario Allegra
    European Journal of Educational Research.2021; volume-10-(volume-10-): 1579.     CrossRef
  • Abordagens de aprendizado e sua correlação com ambiente educacional e características individuais em escola médica
    Giulia Zanata Rossi, João Marcos da Silva Fischer, Sheyla Ribeiro Rocha, Gabriel Avila Casalecchi, Lucimar da Silva Retto de Avó, Carla Maria Ramos Germano
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Self-determined motivation for data-based decision-making: A relevance intervention in teacher training
    Felix Dübbers, Martin Schmidt-Daffy, Timo Ehmke
    Cogent Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Effectiveness of Executive Function Training on Students' Academic Vitality and Academic Performance
    Sirous Soorgi, Yasaman Godarzi, Nadereh Shabib Asl, Morteza Ghorbani
    Pajouhan Scientific Journal.2021; 19(5): 43.     CrossRef
  • Self-determination and development of emotional-social competences and the level of school achievements in 10–11-year-old Polish students
    Tomasz Knopik, Urszula Oszwa
    Education 3-13.2020; 48(8): 972.     CrossRef
  • How medical students’ perceptions of instructor autonomy-support mediate their motivation and psychological well-being
    Adam Neufeld, Greg Malin
    Medical Teacher.2020; 42(6): 650.     CrossRef
  • Exploring teachers’ motivation to teach: A multisite study on the associations with the work climate, students’ motivation, and teaching approaches
    Cesar A. Orsini, Jorge A. Tricio, Cristina Segura, Doris Tapia
    Journal of Dental Education.2020; 84(4): 429.     CrossRef
  • Basic psychological needs, more than mindfulness and resilience, relate to medical student stress: A case for shifting the focus of wellness curricula
    Adam Neufeld, Annik Mossière, Greg Malin
    Medical Teacher.2020; 42(12): 1401.     CrossRef
  • ‘One size does not fit all’: The value of person-centred analysis in health professions education research
    Rashmi A. Kusurkar, Marianne Mak-van der Vossen, Joyce Kors, Jan-Willem Grijpma, Stéphanie M. E. Van der Burgt, Andries S. Koster, Anne De la Croix
    Perspectives on Medical Education.2020; 10(4): 245.     CrossRef
  • Bibliometric and content analysis of Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions in 2018
    Yera Hur
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2018; 15: 35.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions