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Research articles
Effect of an interprofessional simulation program on patient safety competencies of healthcare professionals in Switzerland: a before and after study  
Sylvain Boloré, Thomas Fassier, Nicolas Guirimand
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:25.   Published online August 28, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.25
  • 1,037 View
  • 132 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to identify the effects of a 12-week interprofessional simulation program, operated between February 2020 and January 2021, on the patient safety competencies of healthcare professionals in Switzerland.
Methods
The simulation training was based on 2 scenarios of hospitalized patients with septic shock and respiratory failure, and trainees were expected to demonstrate patient safety competencies. A single-group before and after study was conducted after the intervention—simulation program, using a measurement tool (the Health Professional Education in Patient Safety Survey) to measure the perceived competencies of physicians, nurses, and nursing assistants. Out of 57 participants, 37 answered the questionnaire surveys 4 times: 48 hours before the training, followed by post-surveys at 24 hours, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks after the training. The linear mixed effect model was applied for the analysis.
Results
Four components out of 6 perceived patient safety competencies improved at 6 weeks but returned to a similar level before training at 12 weeks. Competencies of “communicating effectively,” “managing safety risks,” “understanding human and environmental factors that influence patient safety,” and “recognize and respond to remove immediate risks of harm” are statistically significant both overall and in the comparison between before the training and 6 weeks after the training.
Conclusion
Interprofessional simulation programs contributed to developing some areas of patient safety competencies of healthcare professionals, but only for a limited time. Interprofessional simulation programs should be repeated and combined with other forms of support, including case discussions and debriefings, to ensure lasting effects.
Effect of online education on the knowledge on, attitudes towards, and skills in patient safety for nursing students in Korea: a mixed-methods study  
Dan Bi Cho, Won Lee, So Yoon Kim, Sungkyoung Choi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:14.   Published online June 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.14
  • 2,968 View
  • 361 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of synchronous online education on the patient safety competency (knowledge, attitudes, and skills) of nursing students in Korea and to explore what they thought about this educational method.
Methods
A single-group pre-and post-test design and summative content analysis were implemented. On November 14th, 2020, 110 nursing students completed synchronous online patient safety education. Patient safety competency was measured before and after the intervention using the revised Patient Safety Competency Self-Evaluation tool. The descriptive statistics, paired t-test, and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to analyze the data. Students also expressed their opinions about this education based on open-ended questions.
Results
All the patient safety competency scores significantly increased after intervention. A summative content analysis of the open-ended questions yielded 5 categories: educational materials, education level, education time, interaction, and educational media.
Conclusion
This study found that synchronous online patient safety education improves nursing students’ knowledge on, attitudes towards, and skills in patient safety. Nursing students also expressed a variety of positive aspects of the online education method. To improve the efficacy of synchronous online patient safety education, there is a need for further empirical studies on the appropriate class duration and difficulty of the content. It is essential to find a way to combine online education with various learning activities.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Effects of the small private online course combined with simulation-based training in a patient safety education program among nursing students: A quasi-experimental study
    Hui Li, Wenzhong Zhao, Bo Li, Yanhong Li
    International Journal of Nursing Sciences.2023; 10(4): 555.     CrossRef
Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats analysis of integrating the World Health Organization patient safety curriculum into undergraduate medical education in Pakistan: a qualitative case study  
Samreen Misbah, Usman Mahboob
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:35.   Published online December 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.35
  • 43,805 View
  • 464 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to conduct a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis of integrating the World Health Organization (WHO) patient safety curriculum into undergraduate medical education in Pakistan.
Methods
A qualitative interpretive case study was conducted at Riphah International University, Islamabad, from October 2016 to June 2017. The study included 9 faculty members and 1 expert on patient safety. The interviews were audiotaped, and a thematic analysis of the transcripts was performed using NVivo software.
Results
Four themes were derived based on the need analysis model. The sub-themes derived from the collected data were arranged under the themes of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, in accordance with the principles of SWOT analysis. The strengths identified were the need for a formal patient safety curriculum and its early integration into the undergraduate program. The weaknesses were faculty awareness and participation in development programs. The opportunities were an ongoing effort to develop an appropriate curriculum, to improve the current culture of healthcare, and to use the WHO curricular resource guide. The threats were attitudes towards patient safety in Pakistani culture, resistance to implementation from different levels, and the role of regulatory authorities.
Conclusion
The theme of patient safety needs to be incorporated early into the formal medical education curriculum, with the main goals of striving to do no harm and seeing mistakes as opportunities to learn. Faculty development activities need to be organized, and faculty members should to be encouraged to participate in them. The lack of a patient safety culture was identified as the primary reason for resistance to this initiative at many levels. The WHO curriculum, amended according to local institutional culture, can be implemented appropriately with support from the corresponding regulatory bodies.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Explanation of Evolving Health Technical and Vocational Education and Training System: A National Experience
    Soleiman Ahmady, Sara Shahbazi
    Journal of Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Work Safety on Organizational Social Sustainability Improvement in the Healthcare Sector: The Case of a Public Sector Hospital in Pakistan
    Zia Ullah, Mohammed Ali Bait Ali Sulaiman, Syed Babar Ali, Naveed Ahmad, Miklas Scholz, Heesup Han
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(12): 6672.     CrossRef
  • Understanding the significance of patient safety and designing a novel curriculum using Kern's six-step approach
    SaurabhRamBihariLal Shrivastava, PrateekSaurabh Shrivastava
    Muller Journal of Medical Sciences and Research.2021; 12(1): 56.     CrossRef
  • Promoting Physical Activity in Group Home Settings: Staff Perspectives through a SWOT Analysis
    Bik C. Chow, Peggy Hiu Nam Choi, Wendy Yajun Huang, Chien-yu Pan
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(16): 5805.     CrossRef
  • Ten years of the Helsinki Declaration on patient safety in anaesthesiology
    Benedikt Preckel, Sven Staender, Daniel Arnal, Guttorm Brattebø, Jeffrey M. Feldman, Robert Ffrench-O’Carroll, Thomas Fuchs-Buder, Sara N. Goldhaber-Fiebert, Guy Haller, Arvid S. Haugen, Jan F.A. Hendrickx, Cor J. Kalkman, Patrick Meybohm, Christopher Neu
    European Journal of Anaesthesiology.2020; 37(7): 521.     CrossRef
  • Developing strategies for patient safety implementation: a national study in Iran
    Ali Maher, Ali Ayoubian, Sima Rafiei, Donya Sheibani Tehrani, Farnaz Mostofian, Pooneh Mazyar
    International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance.2019; 32(8): 1113.     CrossRef
Research Article
How can a postgraduate professional education and development course benefit general practitioners?: a qualitative study  
Steven Agius, Rebecca Baron, Barry Lewis, Stephen Luckhurst, Mark Sloan, Thomas Ward
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:31.   Published online June 20, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.31
  • 28,843 View
  • 176 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The rationale for ‘professional education and development’ (PED) courses is to support general practitioners, enabling them to access a range of theoretical and practical skills within a supportive schema. It aims to identify whether and how a regional PED course has had a beneficial impact upon participants. Methods: The study comprised a qualitative investigation of participants’ assessed coursework portfolios. The content of each portfolio gives individual accounts of the impact of the course on personal and practice development. Permission to access extant portfolios was obtained from 16 recent alumni of the course. The anonymous written material was analysed by the research team for recurring discourses and themes using a thematic framework analysis. Results: Seven major thematic categories were extrapolated from the data: leadership, resilience, quality improvement, change management, development of new services, educational expertise, and patient safety. In each category, we found evidence that the course enabled development of practitioners by enhancing knowledge and skills which had a positive impact upon their self-perceived effectiveness and motivation. Conclusion: Extended specialty training is on the horizon but such courses may still serve a valuable purpose for current trainees and the existing general practitioners workforce which will be responsible for leading the shift towards community-based service delivery.

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions