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Brief reports
Impact of multi-professional simulation-based training on perceptions of safety and preparedness among health workers caring for coronavirus disease 2019 patients in Pakistan  
Jamal Azfar Khan, Muhammad Rizwan Bashir Kiani
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:19.   Published online June 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.19
  • 6,191 View
  • 209 Download
  • 13 Web of Science
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This study aimed to evaluate perceptions of safety and preparedness among health workers caring for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients before and after a multi-professional simulation-based course in Pakistan. Health workers’ perceptions of preparedness, safety, and their willingness to care for COVID-19 patients were measured before and after they attended a simulation-based training course to prepare them to care for COVID-19 patients at Combined Military Hospital Landi Kotal Cantt, from March 1 to April 30, 2020. The participants’ perceived level of safety and preparedness to care for COVID-19 patients before the simulation-based course was low, but increased after completing it (P<0.05). They felt confident and were significantly more willing to care for patients with COVID-19 or other infections requiring strict isolation. Simulation-based training is an effective tool to improve perceptions of risk and readiness to deal with COVID-19 among medical and non-medical health workers in Pakistan.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Health Care Simulation as a Training Tool for Epidemic Management
    Marcia A. Corvetto, Fernando R. Altermatt, Francisca Belmar, Eliana Escudero
    Simulation in Healthcare: The Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare.2023; 18(6): 382.     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting the Preparedness to Care for Patients with Highly Infectious Diseases among Nursing Staff in Long-term Care Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Descriptive Study
    Ye Seul Lee, Min Hye Lee
    Korean Journal of Adult Nursing.2023; 35(1): 35.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of Simulation-Based Education for Caring Patients with COVID-19
    Min Hye Lee, Eun-Young Noh
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing.2023; 53(4): 397.     CrossRef
  • Education and Training Adaptations for Health Workers during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Scoping Review of Lessons Learned and Innovations
    Perla Boutros, Nour Kassem, Jessica Nieder, Catalina Jaramillo, Jakob von Petersdorff, Fiona J. Walsh, Till Bärnighausen, Sandra Barteit
    Healthcare.2023; 11(21): 2902.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 Pandemic Support Programs for Healthcare Workers and Implications for Occupational Mental Health: A Narrative Review
    Eden David, Jonathan M. DePierro, Deborah B. Marin, Vanshdeep Sharma, Dennis S. Charney, Craig L. Katz
    Psychiatric Quarterly.2022; 93(1): 227.     CrossRef
  • How stressful was the COVID-19 pandemic for residents specializing in family practice?. A study of stressors and psychological well-being of physicians in further training specializing in family practice (GP trainees) within a pandemic context
    Anna-Maria von Oltersdorff-Kalettka, Janina Meinel, Karen Voigt, Thomas Mundt, Markus Bleckwenn, Antje Bergmann, Mandy Gottschall
    BMC Primary Care.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • An update on developments in medical education in response to the COVID-19 pandemic: A BEME scoping review: BEME Guide No. 64
    Michelle Daniel, Morris Gordon, Madalena Patricio, Ahmad Hider, Cameron Pawlik, Rhea Bhagdev, Shoaib Ahmad, Sebastian Alston, Sophie Park, Teresa Pawlikowska, Eliot Rees, Andrea Jane Doyle, Mohan Pammi, Satid Thammasitboon, Mary Haas, William Peterson, Ma
    Medical Teacher.2021; 43(3): 253.     CrossRef
  • Training in healthcare during and after COVID-19: proposal for simulation training
    Carolina Felipe Soares Brandão, Ellen Cristina Bergamasco, Gabriela Furst Vaccarezza, Maria Luiza Ferreira de Barba, Enrico Ferreira Martins de Andrade, Dario Cecilio-Fernandes
    Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira.2021; 67( suppl 1): 12.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 Critical Care Simulations: An International Cross-Sectional Survey
    Mohamad-Hani Temsah, Abdulkarim Alrabiaah, Ayman Al-Eyadhy, Fahad Al-Sohime, Abdullah Al Huzaimi, Nurah Alamro, Khalid Alhasan, Vaibhavi Upadhye, Amr Jamal, Fadi Aljamaan, Ali Alhaboob, Yaseen M. Arabi, Marc Lazarovici, Ali M. Somily, Abdulaziz M. Boker
    Frontiers in Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Interprofessional work in health in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic: a scoping review
    Sâmara Fontes Fernandes, Jaira Gonçalves Trigueiro, Márcio Adriano Fernandes Barreto, Rhanna Emanuela Fontenele Lima de Carvalho, Maria Rocineide Ferreira da Silva, Thereza Maria Magalhães Moreira, Marcelo Viana da Costa, Rodrigo Jácob Moreira de Freitas
    Revista da Escola de Enfermagem da USP.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of Simulation-Based Education on the Preparedness of Healthcare Professionals for the COVID-19 Pandemic: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Marc-André Maheu-Cadotte, Alexandra Lapierre, Guillaume Fontaine, Tanya Mailhot, Patrick Lavoie
    Science of Nursing and Health Practices.2021; 4(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Being Prepared During the Evolving COVID-19 Pandemic: A Neonatal Experience in Training and Simulation
    Juin Yee Kong, Srabani Samanta Bharadwaj, Amutha Chinnadurai, Selina Kah Ying Ho
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Reflections as 2020 comes to an end: the editing and educational environment during the COVID-19 pandemic, the power of Scopus and Web of Science in scholarly publishing, journal statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 44.     CrossRef
Physical therapy students’ perceptions of the educational environment at physical therapy institutes in Pakistan  
Muhammad Adeel, Asad Chaudhry
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:7.   Published online February 24, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.7
  • 6,414 View
  • 152 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study assessed doctor of physical therapy (DPT) students’ perceptions of the educational environment at public and private physical therapy institutes in Pakistan. This cross-sectional study was conducted at 6 physical therapy institutions in Punjab, Pakistan from April 2018 to December 2019. In total, 500 Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM) questionnaires were distributed among DPT students identified through convenience sampling (response rate, 86.4%). The correlations between each item of the DREEM score were analyzed. The mean overall DREEM score was 128±19.63 for all 5 subscales (range, 33 to 166; standard error of the mean, 0.954). The correlations of atmosphere, learning, and self-perception with the overall educational environment were r=0.896, r=0.853, and r=0.846, respectively. Student-centered approaches were found to be more effective than teacher-centered approaches for promoting a positive educational environment.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Evaluation of providers’ assistive technology service delivery practices in Pakistan
    Areeba Khan, Mary Goldberg, Jonathan Pearlman, Lauren Terhorst
    Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology.2023; : 1.     CrossRef
Research article
Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats analysis of integrating the World Health Organization patient safety curriculum into undergraduate medical education in Pakistan: a qualitative case study  
Samreen Misbah, Usman Mahboob
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:35.   Published online December 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.35
  • 43,805 View
  • 464 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to conduct a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis of integrating the World Health Organization (WHO) patient safety curriculum into undergraduate medical education in Pakistan.
Methods
A qualitative interpretive case study was conducted at Riphah International University, Islamabad, from October 2016 to June 2017. The study included 9 faculty members and 1 expert on patient safety. The interviews were audiotaped, and a thematic analysis of the transcripts was performed using NVivo software.
Results
Four themes were derived based on the need analysis model. The sub-themes derived from the collected data were arranged under the themes of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, in accordance with the principles of SWOT analysis. The strengths identified were the need for a formal patient safety curriculum and its early integration into the undergraduate program. The weaknesses were faculty awareness and participation in development programs. The opportunities were an ongoing effort to develop an appropriate curriculum, to improve the current culture of healthcare, and to use the WHO curricular resource guide. The threats were attitudes towards patient safety in Pakistani culture, resistance to implementation from different levels, and the role of regulatory authorities.
Conclusion
The theme of patient safety needs to be incorporated early into the formal medical education curriculum, with the main goals of striving to do no harm and seeing mistakes as opportunities to learn. Faculty development activities need to be organized, and faculty members should to be encouraged to participate in them. The lack of a patient safety culture was identified as the primary reason for resistance to this initiative at many levels. The WHO curriculum, amended according to local institutional culture, can be implemented appropriately with support from the corresponding regulatory bodies.

Citations

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  • Explanation of Evolving Health Technical and Vocational Education and Training System: A National Experience
    Soleiman Ahmady, Sara Shahbazi
    Journal of Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Work Safety on Organizational Social Sustainability Improvement in the Healthcare Sector: The Case of a Public Sector Hospital in Pakistan
    Zia Ullah, Mohammed Ali Bait Ali Sulaiman, Syed Babar Ali, Naveed Ahmad, Miklas Scholz, Heesup Han
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(12): 6672.     CrossRef
  • Understanding the significance of patient safety and designing a novel curriculum using Kern's six-step approach
    SaurabhRamBihariLal Shrivastava, PrateekSaurabh Shrivastava
    Muller Journal of Medical Sciences and Research.2021; 12(1): 56.     CrossRef
  • Promoting Physical Activity in Group Home Settings: Staff Perspectives through a SWOT Analysis
    Bik C. Chow, Peggy Hiu Nam Choi, Wendy Yajun Huang, Chien-yu Pan
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(16): 5805.     CrossRef
  • Ten years of the Helsinki Declaration on patient safety in anaesthesiology
    Benedikt Preckel, Sven Staender, Daniel Arnal, Guttorm Brattebø, Jeffrey M. Feldman, Robert Ffrench-O’Carroll, Thomas Fuchs-Buder, Sara N. Goldhaber-Fiebert, Guy Haller, Arvid S. Haugen, Jan F.A. Hendrickx, Cor J. Kalkman, Patrick Meybohm, Christopher Neu
    European Journal of Anaesthesiology.2020; 37(7): 521.     CrossRef
  • Developing strategies for patient safety implementation: a national study in Iran
    Ali Maher, Ali Ayoubian, Sima Rafiei, Donya Sheibani Tehrani, Farnaz Mostofian, Pooneh Mazyar
    International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance.2019; 32(8): 1113.     CrossRef
Research Articles
Comparison of the knowledge, attitudes, and perception of barriers regarding adverse drug reaction reporting between pharmacy and medical students in Pakistan  
Muhammad Umair Khan, Akram Ahmad, Areeba Ejaz, Syed Ata Rizvi, Ayesha Sardar, Kazim Hussain, Tayyaba Zaffar, Shazia Q. Jamshed
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:28.   Published online June 17, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.28
  • 30,873 View
  • 214 Download
  • 14 Web of Science
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The goal of this study was to compare the knowledge and attitudes of pharmacy and medical students regarding adverse drug reactions (ADRs), as well as their perceptions of barriers to ADR reporting, in a Higher Education Commission-recognised Pakistani university.
Methods
A cross-sectional study was conducted among final-year pharmacy (n=91) and medical (n=108) students in Pakistan from June 1 to July 31, 2014. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. The responses of pharmacy students were compared to those of medical students.
Results
Pharmacy students had a significantly better knowledge of ADRs than medical students (mean±SD, 5.61±1.78 vs. 3.23±1.60; P<0.001). Gender showed a significant relationship to knowledge about ADRs, and male participants were apparently more knowledgeable than their female counterparts (P<0.001). The attitudes of pharmacy students regarding their capability to handle and report ADRs were significantly more positive than those of medical students (P<0.05). In comparison to pharmacy students, a lack of knowledge of where and how to report ADRs was the main barrier that medical students perceived to ADR reporting (P=0.001).
Conclusion
Final-year pharmacy students exhibited more knowledge about ADRs and showed more positive attitudes regarding their capacity to handle and report ADRs than final-year medical students.

Citations

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  • Teaching pharmacovigilance to French medical students during the COVID-19 pandemic: Interest of distance learning clinical reasoning sessions
    François Montastruc, Fabrice Muscari, Ivan Tack, Justine Benevent, Margaux Lafaurie, Claire de Canecaude, Haleh Bagheri, Fabien Despas, Christine Damase-Michel, Geneviève Durrieu, Agnès Sommet
    Therapies.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Enhancing Patient Safety: A Cross-Sectional Study to Assess Medical Interns’ Attitude and Knowledge About Medication Safety in Saudi Arabia
    Raghad Hijazi, Hatouf Sukkarieh, Rami Bustami, Jibran Khan, Reema Aldhalaan
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Assessment of the Current State of Pharmacovigilance System in Pakistan Using Indicator-Based Assessment Tool
    Muhammad Akhtar Abbas Khan, Saima Hamid, Tofeeq Ur-Rehman, Zaheer-Ud-Din Babar
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A National Survey of Community Pharmacists’ Viewpoints About Pharmacovigilance and Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting in Saudi Arabia
    Mona Y. Alsheikh, Moudi M. Alasmari
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Connaissances et perception de la pharmacovigilance par les futurs pharmaciens marocains
    N. Nchinech, Z. Lachhab, M. Obtel, Y. Cherrah, S. Serragui
    Annales Pharmaceutiques Françaises.2021; 79(3): 291.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Medical, Pharmacy, and Nursing Students Towards Pharmacovigilance and Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting at University of Gondar College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Northwest Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Masho Tigabe Tekel, Abaynesh Fentahun Bekalu, Faisel Dula Sema
    Advances in Medical Education and Practice.2021; Volume 12: 1129.     CrossRef
  • Quality assessment of individual case safety reports in pharmacovigilance in Burkina Faso
    Nazaire Roamba, Emile Windné Ouedraogo, Estelle Noella Hoho Youl, S. Bourekkadi, H. Hami, A. Mokhtari, K. Slimani, A. Soulaymani
    E3S Web of Conferences.2021; 319: 01073.     CrossRef
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    Monira Alwhaibi, Ghaida Alhindi, Majd Alshamrani, Maryam Bin Essa, Noha A. Al Aloola, Tariq M. Alhawassi
    BMC Medical Education.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Yusuf KARATAŞ, Zakir KHAN, Ezgi Sena GÖREN ÖZAGİL, Ayşe Büşra ABUSSUUTOĞLU, Aykut PELİT, Elif KOÇAK
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    Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology.2019; 124(5): 591.     CrossRef
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The need for redesigned pharmacy practice courses in Pakistan: the perspectives of senior pharmacy students  
Muhammad Umair Khan, Akram Ahmad, Kazim Hussain, Aqsa Salam, Zain-ul Hasnain, Isha Patel
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:27.   Published online June 16, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.27
  • 28,070 View
  • 133 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
In Pakistan, courses in pharmacy practice, which are an essential component of the PharmD curriculum, were launched with the aim of strengthening pharmacy practice overall and enabling pharmacy students to cope with the challenges involved in meeting real-world healthcare needs. Since very little research has assessed the efficacy of such courses, we aimed to evaluate students’ perceptions of pharmacy practice courses and their opinions about whether their current knowledge of the topics covered in pharmacy practice courses is adequate for future practice. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted over two months among the senior pharmacy students of two pharmacy colleges. A content- and face-validated questionnaire was used to collect data, which were then analysed using SPSS version 20. Descriptive analysis and logistic regression were performed. Results: Research in pharmacy practice (30.2%), applied drug information (34.4%), health policy (38.1%), public health and epidemiology (39.5%), pharmacovigilance (45.6%), and pharmacoeconomics (47.9%) were the major courses that were covered to the least extent in the PharmD curriculum. However, hospital pharmacy practice (94.4%), pharmacotherapeutics (88.8%), and community pharmacy practice (82.8%) were covered well. Although 94% of students considered these courses important, only 37.2% considered themselves to be competent in the corresponding topics. Of the participants, 87.9% agreed that the pharmacy courses in the present curriculum should be redesigned. Conclusion: Our results showed that the pharmacy practice courses in the current PharmD curriculum do not encompass some important core subjects. A nationwide study is warranted to further establish the necessity for remodelling pharmacy practice courses in Pakistan.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Perceptions of and Preparedness for the Application of Pharmacoeconomics in Practice, among Final Year Bachelor of Pharmacy Students in South Africa: A National Cross-Sectional Study
    Carlien Schmidt, Moliehi Matlala, Brian Godman, Amanj Kurdi, Johanna C. Meyer
    Pharmacy.2023; 11(2): 54.     CrossRef
  • Perspectives on an amended law addressing pharmacists' availability in community pharmacies
    Gohar Qadeer, Mohamed Ezzat Khamis Amin
    Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.2021; 27(1): 151.     CrossRef
  • Pharmacy Services beyond the Basics: A Qualitative Study to Explore Perspectives of Pharmacists towards Basic and Enhanced Pharmacy Services in Pakistan
    Muhammad Atif, Wajiha Razzaq, Irem Mushtaq, Iram Malik, Madiha Razzaq, Shane Scahill, Zaheer-Ud-Din Babar
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(7): 2379.     CrossRef
  • Pharmacists’ Knowledge and Practice of Issues Related to Using Psychotropic Medication in Elderly People in Ethiopia: A Prospective Cross-Sectional Study
    Gashaw Binega Mekonnen, Alemante Tafese Beyna
    BioMed Research International.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
  • Farmacovigilância: uma estratégia biopolítica
    Cléber Domingos Cunha da Silva
    Saúde e Sociedade.2018; 27(3): 860.     CrossRef
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    Ramzi Shawahna, Mais Khaskiyyi, Hadeel Abdo, Yasmen Msarwe, Rania Odeh, Souad Salame
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2017; 14: 8.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Higher stress scores for female medical students measured by the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10) in Pakistan  
Khadija Qamar, Muhammad Rizwan Bash Kiani, Aisha Ayyub, Atif Ahmed Khan, Mohammad Osama
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:27.   Published online October 9, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.27
  • 25,248 View
  • 162 Download
  • 10 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The aim of this study was to determine the stress level of medical students and the relationship between stress and academic year. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted at an undergraduate medical school with a five-year curriculum, in Pakistan, from January 2014 to April 2014. Medical students in the first four years were included in the study. The Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10), a self-administered questionnaire, was distributed to the students. A total of 445 medical students completed the questionnaire. The average stress score was 19.61 (SD = 6.76) with a range from 10 to 43. Stress was experienced by 169 students (41.7%). The scores of female students were higher than scores of males, indicating a higher stress level (P = 0.011). The relationship between stress and academic year was insignificant (P = 0.392).

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JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions