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Research articles
Experience of introducing an electronic health records station in an objective structured clinical examination to evaluate medical students’ communication skills in Canada: a descriptive study  
Kuan-chin Jean Chen, Ilona Bartman, Debra Pugh, David Topps, Isabelle Desjardins, Melissa Forgie, Douglas Archibald
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:22.   Published online July 4, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.22
  • 2,894 View
  • 133 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
There is limited literature related to the assessment of electronic medical record (EMR)-related competencies. To address this gap, this study explored the feasibility of an EMR objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) station to evaluate medical students’ communication skills by psychometric analyses and standardized patients’ (SPs) perspectives on EMR use in an OSCE.
Methods
An OSCE station that incorporated the use of an EMR was developed and pilot-tested in March 2020. Students’ communication skills were assessed by SPs and physician examiners. Students’ scores were compared between the EMR station and 9 other stations. A psychometric analysis, including item total correlation, was done. SPs participated in a post-OSCE focus group to discuss their perception of EMRs’ effect on communication.
Results
Ninety-nine 3rd-year medical students participated in a 10-station OSCE that included the use of the EMR station. The EMR station had an acceptable item total correlation (0.217). Students who leveraged graphical displays in counseling received higher OSCE station scores from the SPs (P=0.041). The thematic analysis of SPs’ perceptions of students’ EMR use from the focus group revealed the following domains of themes: technology, communication, case design, ownership of health information, and timing of EMR usage.
Conclusion
This study demonstrated the feasibility of incorporating EMR in assessing learner communication skills in an OSCE. The EMR station had acceptable psychometric characteristics. Some medical students were able to efficiently use the EMRs as an aid in patient counseling. Teaching students how to be patient-centered even in the presence of technology may promote engagement.
Perception survey on the introduction of clinical performance examination as part of the national nursing licensing examination in Korea  
Su Jin Shin, Yeong Kyeong Kim, Soon-Rim Suh, Duk Yoo Jung, Yunju Kim, Mi Kyoung Yim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:26.   Published online October 25, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.26
  • 31,843 View
  • 295 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to analyze opinions about the action plan for implementation of clinical performance exam as part of the national nursing licensing examination and presents the expected effects of the performance exam and aspects to consider regarding its implementation.
Methods
This study used a mixed-methods design. Quantitative data were collected by a questionnaire survey, while qualitative data were collected by focus group interviews with experts. The survey targeted 200 nursing professors and clinical nurses with more than 5 years of work experience, and the focus group interviews were conducted with 28 of professors, clinical instructors, and nurses at hospitals.
Results
First, nursing professors and clinical specialists agreed that the current written tests have limitations in evaluating examinees’ ability, and that the introduction of a clinical performance exam will yield positive results. Clinical performance exam is necessary to evaluate and improve nurses’ work ability, which means that the implementation of a performance exam is advisable if its credibility and validity can be verified. Second, most respondents chose direct performance exams using simulators or standardized patients as the most suitable format of the test.
Conclusion
In conclusion, the current national nursing licensing exam is somewhat limited in its ability to identify competent nurses. Thus, the time has come for us to seriously consider the introduction of a performance exam. The prerequisites for successfully implementing clinical performance exam as part of the national nursing licensing exam are a professional training process and forming a consortium to standardize practical training.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Clinical Nursing Competency Assessment System of Ghana: Perspectives of Key Informants
    Oboshie Anim-Boamah, Christmal Dela Christmals, Susan Jennifer Armstrong
    SAGE Open.2022; 12(2): 215824402210899.     CrossRef
  • Adaptation of Extended Reality Smart Glasses for Core Nursing Skill Training Among Undergraduate Nursing Students: Usability and Feasibility Study
    Sun Kyung Kim, Youngho Lee, Hyoseok Yoon, Jongmyung Choi
    Journal of Medical Internet Research.2021; 23(3): e24313.     CrossRef
  • Nursing Students’ Experiences on Clinical Competency Assessment in Ghana
    Oboshie Anim-Boamah, Christmal Dela Christmals, Susan Jennifer Armstrong
    Nurse Media Journal of Nursing.2021; 11(3): 278.     CrossRef
  • Clinical nursing competency assessment: a scoping review
    Oboshie Anim-Boamah, Christmal Dela Christmals, Susan Jennifer Armstrong
    Frontiers of Nursing.2021; 8(4): 341.     CrossRef
  • Factors Influencing the Success of the National Nursing Competency Examination taken by the Nursing Diploma Students in Yogyakarta
    Yulia Wardani
    Jurnal Ners.2020; 14(2): 172.     CrossRef
Technical Report
The job analysis of Korean nurses as a strategy to improve the Korean Nursing Licensing Examination  
In Sook Park, Yeon Ok Suh, Hae Sook Park, Soo Yeon Ahn, So Young Kang, Il Sun Ko
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:24.   Published online June 7, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.24
  • 33,373 View
  • 275 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This study aimed at characterizing Korean nurses’ occupational responsibilities to apply the results for improvement of the Korean Nursing Licensing Examination. Methods: First, the contents of nursing job were defined based on a focus group interview of 15 nurses. Developing a Curriculum (DACOM) method was used to examine those results and produce the questionnaire by 13 experts. After that, the questionnaire survey to 5,065 hospital nurses was done. Results: The occupational responsibilities of nurses were characterized as involving 8 duties, 49 tasks, and 303 task elements. Those 8 duties are nursing management and professional development, safety and infection control, the management of potential risk factors, basic nursing and caring, the maintenance of physiological integrity, medication and parenteral treatments, socio-psychological integrity, and the maintenance and improvement of health. Conclusion: The content of Korean Nursing Licensing Examination should be improved based on 8 duties and 49 tasks of the occupational responsibilities of Korean nurses.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Community of inquiry Framework Combined With Podcast Media in Nursing Education innovation During Covid-19 Pandemic: An Evaluative Study
    Ah Yusuf, Ronal Surya Aditya, Daifallah M AlRazeeni, Reem Lafi AlMutairi, Fitriana Kurniasari Solikhah, Siti Kotijah, Wiwit Dwi Nurbadriyah
    Advances in Medical Education and Practice.2023; Volume 14: 573.     CrossRef
  • Suggestion for item allocation to 8 nursing activity categories of the Korean Nursing Licensing Examination: a survey-based descriptive study
    Kyunghee Kim, So Young Kang, Younhee Kang, Youngran Kweon, Hyunjung Kim, Youngshin Song, Juyeon Cho, Mi-Young Choi, Hyun Su Lee
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2023; 20: 18.     CrossRef
  • Item development process and analysis of 50 case-based items for implementation on the Korean Nursing Licensing Examination
    In Sook Park, Yeon Ok Suh, Hae Sook Park, So Young Kang, Kwang Sung Kim, Gyung Hee Kim, Yeon-Hee Choi, Hyun-Ju Kim
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2017; 14: 20.     CrossRef
  • The Knowledge of Nurses on Standards of Job Description at the Intensive Care Units of Broujerd Hospitals, 2016
    Kobrs Rashidi, Mahoush Kalhor, Mahdi Berjandi
    Iranian Journal of Nursing Research.2017; 12(4): 32.     CrossRef
  • Relevance of the test content of the Korean Nursing Licensing Examination to nursing job
    In Sook Park, Yeon Ok Suh, Hae Sook Park, Soo Yeon Ahn, So Young Kang, Kwang Sung Kim
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2016; 13: 23.     CrossRef
Brief Reports
Changing medical students’ perception of the evaluation culture: Is it possible?  
Jorie M. Colbert-Getz, Steven Baumann
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:8.   Published online February 15, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.8
  • 28,424 View
  • 178 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Student feedback is a critical component of the teacher-learner cycle. However, there is not a gold standard course or clerkship evaluation form and limited research on the impact of changing the evaluation process. Results from a focus group and pre-implementation feedback survey coupled with best practices in survey design were used to improve all course/clerkship evaluation for academic year 2013-2014. In spring 2014 we asked all subjected students in University of Utah School of Medicine, United States of America to complete the same feedback survey (post-implementation survey). We assessed the evaluation climate with 3 measures on the feedback survey: overall satisfaction with the evaluation process; time students gave effort to the process; and time students used shortcuts. Scores from these measures were compared between 2013 and 2014 with Mann-Whitney U-tests. Response rates were 79% (254) for 2013 and 52% (179) for 2014. Students’ overall satisfaction score were significantly higher (more positive) post-implementation compared to pre-implementation (P<0.001). There was no change in the amount of time students gave effort to completing evaluations (P=0.981) and no change for the amount of time they used shortcuts to complete evaluations (P=0.956). We were able to change overall satisfaction with the medical school evaluation culture, but there was no change in the amount of time students gave effort to completing evaluations and times they used shortcuts to complete evaluations. To ensure accurate evaluation results we will need to focus our efforts on time needed to complete course evaluations across all four years.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Benefits of focus group discussions beyond online surveys in course evaluations by medical students in the United States: a qualitative study
    Katharina Brandl, Soniya V. Rabadia, Alexander Chang, Jess Mandel
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2018; 15: 25.     CrossRef
Perceptions of dental undergraduates in India of a clinical induction program  
Arati Panchbhai
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:32.   Published online June 21, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.32
  • 23,741 View
  • 154 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study aimed to investigate undergraduate students’ perceptions of the clinical induction program for dental undergraduates conducted at the DMIMS Deemed University, Sawangi-Meghe, India. Seventy-four third-year dental students who entered the clinical phase of the dental program in 2012 and attended all sessions of the clinical induction program were enrolled in this study. The students’ perceptions of the clinical induction program were assessed through a Likert-scale questionnaire, focus group discussions, and individual interviews. Seventy-two students (97.3%) responded positively about the program, evaluating it as successful and making a few suggestions. Fifty-four students (73.0%) stated that the clinical tours and visits to the departments were the best feature of the program. Nine students (12.2%) suggested that the program should include interaction with their immediate seniors and that interactive activities should be included in the program. The induction program may help students become acclimated during the first few days of being introduced into the clinical phase of their education. It is crucial to ensure that students do not develop a negative attitude towards their educational program by facilitating their smooth transition to the clinical phase.
Research Article
Assessment of students’ satisfaction with a student-led team-based learning course  
Justin W. Bouw, Vasudha Gupta, Ana L. Hincapie
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:23.   Published online June 11, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.23
  • 42,919 View
  • 210 Download
  • 18 Web of Science
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
To date, no studies in the literature have examined student delivery of team-based learning (TBL) modules in the classroom. We aimed to assess student perceptions of a student-led TBL elective. Methods: Third-year pharmacy students were assigned topics in teams and developed learning objectives, a 15-minute mini-lecture, and a TBL application exercise and presented them to student colleagues. Students completed a survey upon completion of the course and participated in a focus group discussion to share their views on learning. Results: The majority of students (n=23/30) agreed that creating TBL modules enhanced their understanding of concepts, improved their self-directed learning skills (n=26/30), and improved their comprehension of TBL pedagogy (n=27/30). However, 60% disagreed with incorporating student-generated TBL modules into core curricular classes. Focus group data identified student-perceived barriers to success in the elective, in particular the development of TBL application exercises. Conclusion: This study provides evidence that students positively perceived student-led TBL as encouraging proactive learning from peer-to-peer teaching.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Application of lecture-and-team-based learning in stomatology: in-class and online
    Biyao Wang, Shan Jin, Minghao Huang, Kaige Zhang, Qing Zhou, Xinwen Zhang, Xu Yan
    BMC Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Self-directed learning assessment practices in undergraduate health professions education: a systematic review
    Tracey A.H. Taylor, Kyeorda Kemp, Misa Mi, Sarah Lerchenfeldt
    Medical Education Online.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Team-Based Learning in Prosthodontics Courses: Students’ Satisfaction
    Selma A Saadaldin, Elzahraa Eldwakhly, Sundus Naji Alaziz, Alhanoof Aldegheishem, Amal M El sawy, Maha M. Fahmy, Sahar M. Alsamady, Nozha M. Sawan, Mai Soliman, Boonlert Kukiattrakoon
    International Journal of Dentistry.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • The effect of online and in-person team-based learning (TBL) on undergraduate endocrinology teaching during COVID-19 pandemic
    Shafeena Anas, Ioannis Kyrou, Mariann Rand-Weaver, Emmanouil Karteris
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Development and Evaluation of Interactive Flipped e-Learning (iFEEL) for Pharmacy Students during the COVID-19 Pandemic
    Ahmad A. Shahba, Zaid Alashban, Ibrahim Sales, Abdelrahman Y. Sherif, Osman Yusuf
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(7): 3902.     CrossRef
  • Online flipped classroom with team-based learning promoted learning activity in a clinical laboratory immunology class: response to the COVID-19 pandemic
    Yonghui Feng, Bin Zhao, Jun Zheng, Yajing Fu, Yongjun Jiang
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Enhanced numeracy skills following team-based learning in United States pharmacy students: a longitudinal cohort study
    Rob Edwin Carpenter, Leanne Coyne, Dave Silberman, Jody Kyoto Takemoto
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 29.     CrossRef
  • Team-based learning for teaching musculoskeletal ultrasound skills: a prospective randomised trial
    Cassian Cremerius, Gertraud Gradl-Dietsch, Frank J. P. Beeres, Björn -Christian Link, Lea Hitpaß, Sven Nebelung, Klemens Horst, Christian David Weber, Carl Neuerburg, Daphne Eschbach, Christopher Bliemel, Matthias Knobe
    European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery.2021; 47(4): 1189.     CrossRef
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    Ahmad A. Shahba, Ibrahim Sales
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    Shenghua Zha, Shenghua Wu, Julie M. Estis
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  • Rethinking Teaching Team-Based Learning: The Challenges and Strategies for Medical Education in a Pandemic
    Yun Li, Nicholas A. Sears, Ian V. J. Murray, Kamlesh K. Yadav
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  • Evaluation of student perception of the Team-based Learning method (APA-TBL): Instrument construction and validation
    Mariana Lucas da Rocha Cunha, Fernanda Amendola, Maria Mercedes Fernandez Samperiz, Andrea Gomes da Costa Mohallem
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    Tyler Reimschisel, Anna L. Herring, Jennifer Huang, Tara J. Minor
    Medical Teacher.2017; 39(12): 1227.     CrossRef
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    Clark D. Kebodeaux, Golden L. Peters, Paul M. Stranges, Jamie L. Woodyard, Scott Martin Vouri
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JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions