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Brief report
ChatGPT (GPT-3.5) as an assistant tool in microbial pathogenesis studies in Sweden: a cross-sectional comparative study  
Catharina Hultgren, Annica Lindkvist, Volkan Özenci, Sophie Curbo
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:32.   Published online November 22, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.32
  • 1,225 View
  • 110 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
ChatGPT (GPT-3.5) has entered higher education and there is a need to determine how to use it effectively. This descriptive study compared the ability of GPT-3.5 and teachers to answer questions from dental students and construct detailed intended learning outcomes. When analyzed according to a Likert scale, we found that GPT-3.5 answered the questions from dental students in a similar or even more elaborate way compared to the answers that had previously been provided by a teacher. GPT-3.5 was also asked to construct detailed intended learning outcomes for a course in microbial pathogenesis, and when these were analyzed according to a Likert scale they were, to a large degree, found irrelevant. Since students are using GPT-3.5, it is important that instructors learn how to make the best use of it both to be able to advise students and to benefit from its potential.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Opportunities, challenges, and future directions of large language models, including ChatGPT in medical education: a systematic scoping review
    Xiaojun Xu, Yixiao Chen, Jing Miao
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2024; 21: 6.     CrossRef
  • Information amount, accuracy, and relevance of generative artificial intelligence platforms’ answers regarding learning objectives of medical arthropodology evaluated in English and Korean queries in December 2023: a descriptive study
    Hyunju Lee, Soobin Park
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2023; 20: 39.     CrossRef
Research articles
How dental students’ course experiences and satisfaction of their basic psychological needs influence passion for studying in Chile  
Cesar Orsini, Jorge Tricio, Doris Tapia, Cristina Segura
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:37.   Published online November 29, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.37
  • 8,843 View
  • 247 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to determine how the general course experiences of dental students in Chile and the satisfaction or frustration of their basic psychological needs influenced their passion for studying, and how passion influenced students’ study strategies.
Methods
A correlational cross-sectional study was conducted at 3 Chilean dental schools between April and June 2018, in which 935 undergraduate students participated. Students responded to Spanish-language versions of 4 psychological scale tools: the Course Experience Questionnaire, the Basic Psychological Needs Satisfac¬tion and Frustration Scale, the Passion Scale, and the Revised Study Process Questionnaire. Data were analysed with bivariate correlations and structural equation modelling, controlling for age, gender, year of study, and type of university.
Results
Students’ general course experiences (i.e., good teaching, clear goals and standards, appropriate assessment, and appropriate workload) positively predicted basic need satisfaction and negatively predicted need frustration. Need satisfaction positively predicted passion in students, with stronger scores for harmonious passion. Basic need frustration positively predicted obsessive passion and negatively predicted harmonious passion. Harmonious passion positively predicted deep study strategies and negatively predicted surface study strategies, while obsessive passion positively predicted both deep and surface study strategies.
Conclusion
Dental students’ optimal course experiences positively influenced the satisfaction of their basic psychological needs, which favoured harmonious over obsessive passion. In turn, harmonious over obsessive passion positively influenced deep study strategies. Therefore, efforts should be made to provide course experiences that support students’ basic needs and harmonious passion for studying, both in classroom and chair-side teaching.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Medical student motivation in specialised contexts
    Stacey M. Frumm, Sam Brondfield
    The Clinical Teacher.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Relationship between Psychological Needs and Academic Self-Concept in Physical Education Pre-Service Teachers: A Mediation Analysis
    Antonio Granero-Gallegos, Ginés D. López-García, Antonio Baena-Extremera, Raúl Baños
    Sustainability.2023; 15(5): 4052.     CrossRef
  • Changes in basic psychological needs, passion, and well-being of first-semester graduate students
    Hannah S. Appleseth, Lara J. LaCaille, Rick A. LaCaille, Eric E. Hessler, Jennifer O. Liang
    Journal of American College Health.2023; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Job crafting and well-being among school principals: The role of basic psychological need satisfaction and frustration
    Hiroyuki Toyama, Katja Upadyaya, Katariina Salmela-Aro
    European Management Journal.2022; 40(5): 809.     CrossRef
Motivational profiles and their relationships with basic psychological needs, academic performance, study strategies, self-esteem, and vitality in dental students in Chile  
Cesar A. Orsini, Vivian I. Binnie, Jorge A. Tricio
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:11.   Published online April 19, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.11
  • 37,705 View
  • 400 Download
  • 27 Web of Science
  • 24 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
To determine dental students’ motivational profiles through a person-centred approach and to analyse the associations with the satisfaction of their basic psychological needs, study strategies, academic performance, self-esteem, and vitality.
Methods
A total of 924 students from the University of San Sebastian (Chile) participated in this cross-sectional cor¬relational study in spring 2016. Data were collected through 5 self-reported instruments, in addition to students’ academic performance. The Cronbach alpha, descriptive statistics, and correla¬tion scores were computed. A k-means cluster analysis with intrinsic and controlled motivation was conducted to identify different mo-tivational profiles. Subsequently, multivariate analysis of covariance controlling for the effects of gender and year of study was carried out to assess differences among the retained motivational profiles and learning variables.
Results
All instruments showed acceptable Cronbach alpha scores. A 4-cluster solution was retained for the motivational profile over a 3- or 5-cluster solution. Students’ motiva-tional profiles were characterized by different degrees of intrinsic and controlled motivation. The high intrinsic motivation groups showed higher perceptions of their basic psychological, a greater propensity for a deep rather than surface study strategy, better academic performance, and higher scores for self-esteem and vitality than the low intrinsic motivation groups, regardless of the degree of controlled motivation.
Conclusion
Students with a high intrinsic motivation profile, regardless of their controlled motivation scores, reported better learning characteristics. Therefore, special attention should be paid to students’ motivational profiles, as the quality of motivation might serve as a basis for interventions to support their academic success and well-being.

Citations

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  • Basic psychological needs and GRIT in Peruvian university students
    Nohemi Marcelo-Torres, Maria Pia Manyari-Masias, Raymundo Calderón-Sánchez, Veronica Tutte, Regina Brandão, Tomás Caycho-Rodríguez, Mario Reyes-Bossio
    Frontiers in Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Students’ Motivation for Honors Programs in the Netherlands
    Neha Basnet, Anouk Wouters, Rashmi A. Kusurkar
    SAGE Open.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Profiling learning strategies of medical students: A person‐centered approach
    Nils Otto, Anja Böckers, Thomas Shiozawa, Irene Brunk, Sven Schumann, Daniela Kugelmann, Markus Missler, Dogus Darici
    Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Why Do We Feel Like Intellectual Frauds? A Self-Determination Theory Perspective on the Impostor Phenomenon in Medical Students
    Adam Neufeld, Oksana Babenko, Hollis Lai, Clark Svrcek, Greg Malin
    Teaching and Learning in Medicine.2023; 35(2): 180.     CrossRef
  • The purpose, adaptability, confidence, and engrossment model: A novel approach for supporting professional trainees’ motivation, engagement, and academic achievement
    Adam G. Gavarkovs, Rashmi A. Kusurkar, Ryan Brydges
    Frontiers in Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The impact of community of inquiry and self-efficacy on student attitudes in sustained remote health professions learning environments
    Amanda K. Burbage, Yuane Jia, Thuha Hoang
    BMC Medical Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Modeling the Impact of Motivation Factors on Students’ Study Strategies and Performance Using Machine Learning
    Fidelia A. Orji, Julita Vassileva
    Journal of Educational Technology Systems.2023; 52(2): 274.     CrossRef
  • Examining the Influence of Self-Esteem and Digital Literacy on Professional Competence Factors in Dental Education: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Gulsum Ceylan, Melike Ozlem Eken, Selen Yuruk, Faruk Emir
    Applied Sciences.2023; 13(16): 9411.     CrossRef
  • Motivation to teach as a predictor of resilience and appreciation: An examination in terms of the self-determination theory
    Aylin Mentiş Köksoy, Mehmet Uğur Kutluer
    South African Journal of Education.2023; 43(2): 1.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of Life Goal Framing to Motivate Medical Students During Online Learning: A Randomized Controlled Trial
    Adam G. Gavarkovs, Jeff Crukley, Erin Miller, Rashmi A. Kusurkar, Kulamakan Kulasegaram, Ryan Brydges
    Perspectives on Medical Education.2023; 12(1): 444.     CrossRef
  • Self-Determination Theory SDT as educational and upbringing inspiration
    Urszula Oszwa, Tomasz Knopik
    Studia z Teorii Wychowania.2023; XIV(4 (45)): 165.     CrossRef
  • Motivational Design for Web-Based Instruction in Health Professions Education: Protocol for a Systematic Review and Directed Content Analysis
    Adam Gavarkovs, Rashmi A Kusurkar, Kulamakan Kulasegaram, Jeff Crukley, Erin Miller, Melanie Anderson, Ryan Brydges
    JMIR Research Protocols.2022; 11(11): e42681.     CrossRef
  • From Autonomy Support and Grit to Satisfaction With Life Through Self-Determined Motivation and Group Cohesion in Higher Education
    José Eduardo Lozano-Jiménez, Elisa Huéscar, Juan Antonio Moreno-Murcia
    Frontiers in Psychology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Analysis of perceptual, psychological, and behavioral factors that affect the academic performance of education university students.
    Ana Isabel Beltrán-Velasco, Macarena Donoso-González, Vicente Javier Clemente-Suárez
    Physiology & Behavior.2021; 238: 113497.     CrossRef
  • Exploring Factors Predicting Undergraduate Healthcare Students’ Use of Learning Strategies
    Linda Messineo, Crispino Tosto, Mario Allegra
    European Journal of Educational Research.2021; volume-10-(volume-10-): 1579.     CrossRef
  • Abordagens de aprendizado e sua correlação com ambiente educacional e características individuais em escola médica
    Giulia Zanata Rossi, João Marcos da Silva Fischer, Sheyla Ribeiro Rocha, Gabriel Avila Casalecchi, Lucimar da Silva Retto de Avó, Carla Maria Ramos Germano
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Self-determined motivation for data-based decision-making: A relevance intervention in teacher training
    Felix Dübbers, Martin Schmidt-Daffy, Timo Ehmke
    Cogent Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Effectiveness of Executive Function Training on Students' Academic Vitality and Academic Performance
    Sirous Soorgi, Yasaman Godarzi, Nadereh Shabib Asl, Morteza Ghorbani
    Pajouhan Scientific Journal.2021; 19(5): 43.     CrossRef
  • Self-determination and development of emotional-social competences and the level of school achievements in 10–11-year-old Polish students
    Tomasz Knopik, Urszula Oszwa
    Education 3-13.2020; 48(8): 972.     CrossRef
  • How medical students’ perceptions of instructor autonomy-support mediate their motivation and psychological well-being
    Adam Neufeld, Greg Malin
    Medical Teacher.2020; 42(6): 650.     CrossRef
  • Exploring teachers’ motivation to teach: A multisite study on the associations with the work climate, students’ motivation, and teaching approaches
    Cesar A. Orsini, Jorge A. Tricio, Cristina Segura, Doris Tapia
    Journal of Dental Education.2020; 84(4): 429.     CrossRef
  • Basic psychological needs, more than mindfulness and resilience, relate to medical student stress: A case for shifting the focus of wellness curricula
    Adam Neufeld, Annik Mossière, Greg Malin
    Medical Teacher.2020; 42(12): 1401.     CrossRef
  • ‘One size does not fit all’: The value of person-centred analysis in health professions education research
    Rashmi A. Kusurkar, Marianne Mak-van der Vossen, Joyce Kors, Jan-Willem Grijpma, Stéphanie M. E. Van der Burgt, Andries S. Koster, Anne De la Croix
    Perspectives on Medical Education.2020; 10(4): 245.     CrossRef
  • Bibliometric and content analysis of Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions in 2018
    Yera Hur
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2018; 15: 35.     CrossRef
Does learning style preferences influence academic performance among dental students in Isfahan, Iran?  
Najmeh Akhlaghi, Hosein Mirkazemi, Mehdi Jafarzade, Narjes Akhlaghi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:8.   Published online March 24, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.8
  • 43,763 View
  • 397 Download
  • 12 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The present study aimed to identify the learning preferences of dental students and to characterize their relationship with academic performance at a dental school in Isfahan, Iran.
Methods
This cross-sectional descriptive study included 200 undergraduate dental students from October to November 2016. Data were collected using a 2-part questionnaire. The first part included demographic data, and the second part was a Persian-language version of the visual, aural, read/write, and kinesthetic questionnaire. Data analysis was conducted with the chi-square test, 1-way analysis of variance, and multiple linear regression.
Results
The response rate was 86.6%. Approximately half of the students (51.5%) had multimodal learning preferences. Among the unimodal group (48.5%), the most common mode was aural (24.0%), followed by kinesthetic (15.5%), reading-writing (8.0%), and visual (1.0%). There was a significant association between academic performance and the reading/writing learning style preference (P< 0.01).
Conclusion
Multimodal learning styles were the most preferred. Among single-mode learning styles, the aural style was most common, followed by the kinesthetic style. Students with a reading/writing preference had better academic performance. The results of this study provide useful information for preparing a more problem-based curriculum with active learning strategies.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Preferred Learning Methods among First-year Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Descriptive Study
    Gholamali Dehghani
    Depiction of Health.2024; 15(1): 27.     CrossRef
  • Quantitative Evaluation of Dental Students’ Perceptions of the Roleplay-Video Teaching Modality in Clinical Courses of Dentistry: A Pilot Study
    Kiran Kumar Ganji, Anil Kumar Nagarajappa, Mohammed G Sghaireen, Kumar Chandan Srivastava, Mohammad Khursheed Alam, Shadi Nashwan, Ahmad Al-Qerem, Yousef Khader
    Healthcare.2023; 11(5): 735.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of differentiated instruction on learning outcomes and learning satisfaction in the evidence‐based nursing course: Empirical research quantitative
    Shwu‐Ru Liou, Ching‐Yu Cheng, Tsui‐Ping Chu, Chia‐Hao Chang, Hsiu‐Chen Liu
    Nursing Open.2023; 10(10): 6794.     CrossRef
  • Empowering individual learners: Call for promoting inclusivity among medical students with different learning styles
    SaurabhRamBihariLal Shrivastava, Novina Aryanti, Arief Wibawa
    Environmental Disease.2023; 8(3): 78.     CrossRef
  • Unveiling the learning style puzzle: Factors that shape how medical students learn
    SaurabhRamBihariLal Shrivastava, DhiyaulAthifah M. Jasri
    Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU).2023; 16(3): 435.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, attitude and practice of dentists toward providing care to the geriatric patients
    Bahareh Tahani, Skekoufeh Sedaghat Manesh
    BMC Geriatrics.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The effect of learning style and general self-efficacy on satisfaction of e-Learning in dental students
    Tahereh Baherimoghadam, Shahram Hamedani, Manoosh mehrabi, Navid Naseri, Nooshin Marzban
    BMC Medical Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Identification of Preferred Learning Style of Medical and Dental Students Using VARK Questionnaire
    Ayesha Fahim, Saba Rehman, Fariha Fayyaz, Mariyah Javed, Muhammad Anwaar Alam, Sadia Rana, Fahim Haider Jafari, Mohammad Khursheed Alam, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães Abreu
    BioMed Research International.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Assessing the Students’ Perception of the Quality of Dental Program offered in Saudi Arabia
    Ahmed Al Kuwaiti
    The Open Dentistry Journal.2021; 15(1): 650.     CrossRef
  • General Self-Efficacy and Self-Perceived Confidence of Dental Students in Performing Orthodontic Clinical Skills
    Shahla Momeni Danaei, Niloofar Azadeh, Dana Jafarpur
    Educational Research in Medical Sciences.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Learning Style and Academic Achievement among Students at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran
    Horyeh Sarbazvatan, Abolghasem Amini, Nayyereh Aminisani, SeyedMorteza Shamshirgaran, Saeideh Ghaffarifar
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Brief Report
Perceptions of dental undergraduates in India of a clinical induction program  
Arati Panchbhai
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:32.   Published online June 21, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.32
  • 23,894 View
  • 154 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study aimed to investigate undergraduate students’ perceptions of the clinical induction program for dental undergraduates conducted at the DMIMS Deemed University, Sawangi-Meghe, India. Seventy-four third-year dental students who entered the clinical phase of the dental program in 2012 and attended all sessions of the clinical induction program were enrolled in this study. The students’ perceptions of the clinical induction program were assessed through a Likert-scale questionnaire, focus group discussions, and individual interviews. Seventy-two students (97.3%) responded positively about the program, evaluating it as successful and making a few suggestions. Fifty-four students (73.0%) stated that the clinical tours and visits to the departments were the best feature of the program. Nine students (12.2%) suggested that the program should include interaction with their immediate seniors and that interactive activities should be included in the program. The induction program may help students become acclimated during the first few days of being introduced into the clinical phase of their education. It is crucial to ensure that students do not develop a negative attitude towards their educational program by facilitating their smooth transition to the clinical phase.
Research Article
Assessment of professional competency and need of smoking cessation counseling for dental students  
Rajani A. Dable, Pradnya B. Wasnik, Babita R. Pawar, Sujit S. Bopardikar, Sunilkumar N. Nagmode
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:26.   Published online October 5, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.26
  • 24,382 View
  • 143 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The aim of this study was to analyze the smoking prevalence among dental students and to assess the need for promoting tobacco education and intervention by exploring their knowledge about smoking related risk factors. The study also examined the attitudes and practices of the students toward tobacco consumption, and their responsibilities toward the community. Methods: In total, 53 male students participated in the study (21 juniors and 32 seniors). The training program was divided into three modules, and the questionnaire was administered before and after the counseling sessions, which provided the comparative data on the students’ views about smoking cessation. Results: The most commonly practiced mode of tobacco consumption was found to be cigarette smoking (90.6 %), while a few consumed Gutkha (9.4%). All the junior students (100%) reported to have been benefitted by the counseling program, while 68.8% of the students from the senior group reported the same. Bivariate statistical analysis was conducted using the Pearson’s chi-square test for testing the difference across the age groups. P-values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Conclusion: Curbing tobacco influence on dental students in their initial days can ensure a smoke-free life for them, as well as prevents them from feeling embarrassed or experiencing a lack of confidence while seeing their patients. Thus, tobacco education and intervention programs can motivate the students and increase their potential to be credible advisors regarding smoking cessation.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Global Status of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice on Tobacco Cessation Interventions Among Dental Professionals: A Systematic Review
    Harsh Priya, Manali Deb Barma, Bharathi M Purohit, Deepali Agarwal, Upendra Singh Bhadauria, Nitesh Tewari, Shalini Gupta, Deepika Mishra, Rahul Morankar, Vijay Prakash Mathur, Ritu Duggal
    Tobacco Use Insights.2022; 15: 1179173X2211372.     CrossRef
  • Development and Validation of an Evaluation Tool to Measure the Effectiveness of a Smoking Cessation Training among Healthcare Providers in Malaysia: The Providers’ Smoking Cessation Training Evaluation (ProSCiTE)
    Siti Idayu Hasan, Farizah Mohd Hairi, Amer Siddiq Amer Nordin, Mahmoud Danaee
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2019; 16(21): 4297.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of tobacco use and perceptions of student health professionals about cessation training: results from Global Health Professions Students Survey
    Chandrashekhar T Sreeramareddy, N Ramakrishnareddy, Mahbubur Rahman, Imtiyaz Ali Mir
    BMJ Open.2018; 8(5): e017477.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions