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Online interprofessional education materials through a community learning program during the COVID 19 pandemic in Chile  
Sandra Oyarzo Torres, Mónica Espinoza Barrios
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:6.   Published online March 24, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.6
  • 4,434 View
  • 258 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This article aims to share the online collaborative experience of interprofessional teamwork among healthcare undergraduate students based on community learning during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in Chile. This experience took place in 48 different communities in Chile from November 10, 2020 to January 12, 2021. It was a way of responding to the health education needs of the community when the entire Chilean population was in confinement. Students managed to adapt to the COVID-19 pandemic despite the challenges, including internet connectivity problems and the limited time available to do the work. The educational programs and videos shared in this article will be helpful for other interprofessional health educators to implement the same kind of program.

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  • Successful Development and Implementation of a Large Virtual Interprofessional Education Activity Applying the Social Determinants of Health
    Karl R. Kodweis, Elizabeth A. Hall, Chelsea P. Renfro, Neena Thomas-Gosain, Robin Lennon-Dearing, Jonathon K. Walker, Tyler M. Kiles
    Pharmacy.2022; 10(6): 157.     CrossRef
Research articles
How dental students’ course experiences and satisfaction of their basic psychological needs influence passion for studying in Chile  
Cesar Orsini, Jorge Tricio, Doris Tapia, Cristina Segura
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:37.   Published online November 29, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.37
  • 8,261 View
  • 240 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to determine how the general course experiences of dental students in Chile and the satisfaction or frustration of their basic psychological needs influenced their passion for studying, and how passion influenced students’ study strategies.
Methods
A correlational cross-sectional study was conducted at 3 Chilean dental schools between April and June 2018, in which 935 undergraduate students participated. Students responded to Spanish-language versions of 4 psychological scale tools: the Course Experience Questionnaire, the Basic Psychological Needs Satisfac¬tion and Frustration Scale, the Passion Scale, and the Revised Study Process Questionnaire. Data were analysed with bivariate correlations and structural equation modelling, controlling for age, gender, year of study, and type of university.
Results
Students’ general course experiences (i.e., good teaching, clear goals and standards, appropriate assessment, and appropriate workload) positively predicted basic need satisfaction and negatively predicted need frustration. Need satisfaction positively predicted passion in students, with stronger scores for harmonious passion. Basic need frustration positively predicted obsessive passion and negatively predicted harmonious passion. Harmonious passion positively predicted deep study strategies and negatively predicted surface study strategies, while obsessive passion positively predicted both deep and surface study strategies.
Conclusion
Dental students’ optimal course experiences positively influenced the satisfaction of their basic psychological needs, which favoured harmonious over obsessive passion. In turn, harmonious over obsessive passion positively influenced deep study strategies. Therefore, efforts should be made to provide course experiences that support students’ basic needs and harmonious passion for studying, both in classroom and chair-side teaching.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Relationship between Psychological Needs and Academic Self-Concept in Physical Education Pre-Service Teachers: A Mediation Analysis
    Antonio Granero-Gallegos, Ginés D. López-García, Antonio Baena-Extremera, Raúl Baños
    Sustainability.2023; 15(5): 4052.     CrossRef
  • Changes in basic psychological needs, passion, and well-being of first-semester graduate students
    Hannah S. Appleseth, Lara J. LaCaille, Rick A. LaCaille, Eric E. Hessler, Jennifer O. Liang
    Journal of American College Health.2023; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Medical student motivation in specialised contexts
    Stacey M. Frumm, Sam Brondfield
    The Clinical Teacher.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Job crafting and well-being among school principals: The role of basic psychological need satisfaction and frustration
    Hiroyuki Toyama, Katja Upadyaya, Katariina Salmela-Aro
    European Management Journal.2022; 40(5): 809.     CrossRef
Perception of clinical educational environment by student of physiotherapy based on the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measurement Questionnaire in Chile  
Karen Córdova-León, Lincoyán Fernández-Huerta, Marcela Rojas-Vargas
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:16.   Published online June 14, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.16
  • 17,823 View
  • 267 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
It aimed at describing the perception of the clinical educational environment by physiotherapy students based on the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measurement Questionnaire in Chile.
Methods
The clinical education environment was evaluated according to the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) by 192 students originally enrolled in the fifth year of the physiotherapy career at 3 different headquarters of the academic institution: Santiago, Viña del Mar, and Concepcion Campus (Metropolitan, Valparaiso, and Bio Bio region, respectively), from March to October 2018. The Cronbach’s α was applied to measure the reliability of the instrument and the Student-t and analysis of variance tests were used to compare the differences of PHEEM scores by headquarters, environmental areas, and experience of internship.
Results
A total overall average score of 125.88 was obtained, which meant an excellent educational environment. The overall score was 127.6±22.7 for headquarters 1, 125.6±21.6 for headquarters 2, and 122.5±26.9 for headquarters 3. According to the type of establishment, the scores were of 127.1±22.1 for private and 123.5±26.3 for public institutes. According to the type of area, the score was cataloged as an excellent educational environment in all cases, except in the respiratory care area (lowest score, 117.5±29.1). Finally, the score was 126.9±20.5 for the first internship, 121.7±29.3 for the second, and 129.4±19.6 for the third.
Conclusion
There is relative homogeneity of the clinical educational environment for different headquarters, types of establishment, or type of area; but there are significant differences in the number of the internship. The promotion of a good clinical educational environment can have an important impact on the development and performance of the future professional, being the detection of negative aspects an opportunity to improve the hidden curriculum.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • KNOWLEDGE OF PHYSIOTHERAPY STUDENTS ABOUT SUPERVISION SKILLS DURING THE CLINICAL ROTATION OF INTERNSHIP
    Dr. Tabish Fahim, Dr. Shadab Uddin
    Pakistan Journal of Rehabilitation.2021; 10(2): 31.     CrossRef
  • Moroccan residents’ perceptions of the hospital learning environment measured with the French version of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure
    Hajar Berrani, Redouane Abouqal, Amal Thimou Izgua
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 4.     CrossRef
  • Measuring the impact of oceanographic indices on species distribution shifts: The spatially varying effect of cold‐pool extent in the eastern Bering Sea
    James T. Thorson
    Limnology and Oceanography.2019; 64(6): 2632.     CrossRef
Perceptions of the educational environment among undergraduate physical therapy students in a competency-based curriculum at the University of Chile  
Pablo Quiroga-Marabolí, Marcela Andrea Antúnez-Riveros, Marcela Aguirre-Jerez, Alvaro Besoain Saldaña, José Peralta-Camposano, María Pilar Ruiz de Gauna Bahillo
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:9.   Published online April 29, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.9
  • 15,898 View
  • 288 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to assess the educational environment (EE) among students in a physical therapy undergraduate program, to identify patterns in EE perceptions among the students by year, and to determine issues that should be addressed.
Methods
The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) questionnaire was used to explore the relationships among the total mean score, subscales, and items in a competency-based curriculum in the physical therapy program at the University of Chile. The DREEM questionnaire was filled out by 166 of 244 students (68.03%), of whom 56.6% were men and 43.4% were women, with 75.9% between 19 and 23 years of age.
Results
The total mean score (120.9/200) indicated that the EE was perceived as ‘more positive than negative.’ There were significant differences (P<0.05) between first-year students (113.41), who reported the lowest total mean score, and fourth-year students (126.60), who had the highest total mean score. Students rated their EE favorably on each subscale except social self-perceptions, which second-year students rated as ‘not too bad,’ and for which first-, third-, and fourth-year students gave a rating corresponding to ‘not a nice place.’ On the perceptions of teachers subscale, there were significant differences (P<0.05) between first-year students (28.05/44) and fourth-year students (32.24/44) and between second-year students (28.72/44) and fourth-year students (32.24/44). On the academic self-perceptions subscale, there were significant differences (P<0.05) between first-year students (18.12/32) and second-year (21.68/32), third-year (22.33/32), and fourth-year students (21.87/32).
Conclusion
Physical therapy students at the University of Chile had positive perceptions of their EE. First-year students rated the largest number of items as problematic. Improvements are required across the program in the specific subscales mentioned above.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Perspective of educational environment on students’ perception of teaching and learning
    Falguni Singh, Monika Saini, Ashish Kumar, Seeram Ramakrishna, Mousumi Debnath
    Learning Environments Research.2023; 26(2): 337.     CrossRef
  • The Role of Teaching Hospital Characteristic in Achievement of Doctor Competency in Universitas Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta
    S A T S Estri, A Majdawati, W Kusumawati
    Journal of Physics: Conference Series.2020; 1471(1): 012038.     CrossRef
  • Perception of clinical educational environment by student of physiotherapy based on the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measurement Questionnaire in Chile
    Karen Córdova-León, Lincoyán Fernández-Huerta, Marcela Rojas-Vargas
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2019; 16: 16.     CrossRef
Motivational profiles and their relationships with basic psychological needs, academic performance, study strategies, self-esteem, and vitality in dental students in Chile  
Cesar A. Orsini, Vivian I. Binnie, Jorge A. Tricio
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:11.   Published online April 19, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.11
  • 37,169 View
  • 391 Download
  • 24 Web of Science
  • 23 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
To determine dental students’ motivational profiles through a person-centred approach and to analyse the associations with the satisfaction of their basic psychological needs, study strategies, academic performance, self-esteem, and vitality.
Methods
A total of 924 students from the University of San Sebastian (Chile) participated in this cross-sectional cor¬relational study in spring 2016. Data were collected through 5 self-reported instruments, in addition to students’ academic performance. The Cronbach alpha, descriptive statistics, and correla¬tion scores were computed. A k-means cluster analysis with intrinsic and controlled motivation was conducted to identify different mo-tivational profiles. Subsequently, multivariate analysis of covariance controlling for the effects of gender and year of study was carried out to assess differences among the retained motivational profiles and learning variables.
Results
All instruments showed acceptable Cronbach alpha scores. A 4-cluster solution was retained for the motivational profile over a 3- or 5-cluster solution. Students’ motiva-tional profiles were characterized by different degrees of intrinsic and controlled motivation. The high intrinsic motivation groups showed higher perceptions of their basic psychological, a greater propensity for a deep rather than surface study strategy, better academic performance, and higher scores for self-esteem and vitality than the low intrinsic motivation groups, regardless of the degree of controlled motivation.
Conclusion
Students with a high intrinsic motivation profile, regardless of their controlled motivation scores, reported better learning characteristics. Therefore, special attention should be paid to students’ motivational profiles, as the quality of motivation might serve as a basis for interventions to support their academic success and well-being.

Citations

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  • Basic psychological needs and GRIT in Peruvian university students
    Nohemi Marcelo-Torres, Maria Pia Manyari-Masias, Raymundo Calderón-Sánchez, Veronica Tutte, Regina Brandão, Tomás Caycho-Rodríguez, Mario Reyes-Bossio
    Frontiers in Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Students’ Motivation for Honors Programs in the Netherlands
    Neha Basnet, Anouk Wouters, Rashmi A. Kusurkar
    SAGE Open.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Why Do We Feel Like Intellectual Frauds? A Self-Determination Theory Perspective on the Impostor Phenomenon in Medical Students
    Adam Neufeld, Oksana Babenko, Hollis Lai, Clark Svrcek, Greg Malin
    Teaching and Learning in Medicine.2023; 35(2): 180.     CrossRef
  • The purpose, adaptability, confidence, and engrossment model: A novel approach for supporting professional trainees’ motivation, engagement, and academic achievement
    Adam G. Gavarkovs, Rashmi A. Kusurkar, Ryan Brydges
    Frontiers in Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The impact of community of inquiry and self-efficacy on student attitudes in sustained remote health professions learning environments
    Amanda K. Burbage, Yuane Jia, Thuha Hoang
    BMC Medical Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Modeling the Impact of Motivation Factors on Students’ Study Strategies and Performance Using Machine Learning
    Fidelia A. Orji, Julita Vassileva
    Journal of Educational Technology Systems.2023; 52(2): 274.     CrossRef
  • Examining the Influence of Self-Esteem and Digital Literacy on Professional Competence Factors in Dental Education: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Gulsum Ceylan, Melike Ozlem Eken, Selen Yuruk, Faruk Emir
    Applied Sciences.2023; 13(16): 9411.     CrossRef
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    Aylin Mentiş Köksoy, Mehmet Uğur Kutluer
    South African Journal of Education.2023; 43(2): 1.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of Life Goal Framing to Motivate Medical Students During Online Learning: A Randomized Controlled Trial
    Adam G. Gavarkovs, Jeff Crukley, Erin Miller, Rashmi A. Kusurkar, Kulamakan Kulasegaram, Ryan Brydges
    Perspectives on Medical Education.2023; 12(1): 444.     CrossRef
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    Urszula Oszwa, Tomasz Knopik
    Studia z Teorii Wychowania.2023; XIV(4 (45)): 165.     CrossRef
  • Motivational Design for Web-Based Instruction in Health Professions Education: Protocol for a Systematic Review and Directed Content Analysis
    Adam Gavarkovs, Rashmi A Kusurkar, Kulamakan Kulasegaram, Jeff Crukley, Erin Miller, Melanie Anderson, Ryan Brydges
    JMIR Research Protocols.2022; 11(11): e42681.     CrossRef
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    José Eduardo Lozano-Jiménez, Elisa Huéscar, Juan Antonio Moreno-Murcia
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    Linda Messineo, Crispino Tosto, Mario Allegra
    European Journal of Educational Research.2021; 10(3): 1579.     CrossRef
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JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions