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Review
History of the medical education accreditation system in Korea: implementation and activities in the early stages  
Kwang-ho Meng
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:29.   Published online October 21, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.29
  • 3,547 View
  • 81 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Following the opening of 12 new medical schools in Korea in the 1980s, standardization and accreditation of medical schools came to the forefront in the early 1990s. To address the medical community’s concerns about the quality of medical education, the Korean Council for University Education and Ministry of Education conducted a compulsory medical school evaluation in 1996 to see whether medical schools were meeting academic standards or not. This evaluation was, however, a norm-referenced assessment, rather than a criterion-referenced assessment. As a result, the Accreditation Board for Medical Education in Korea (ABMEK) was founded in 1998 as a voluntary organization by the medical community. With full support of the Korean medical community, ABMEK completed its 1st cycle of evaluations of all 41 medical schools from 2000 to 2004. In 2004, ABMEK changed its name to the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation (KIMEE) as a corporate body. After that, the Korean government paid closer attention to its voluntary accreditation activities. In 2014, the Ministry of Education officially recognized the KIMEE as the 1st professional institute for higher education evaluation accreditation. The most important lesson learned from ABMEK/KIMEE is the importance of collaboration among all medical education-related organizations, including the Korean Medical Association.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Special reviews on the history and future of the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation to memorialize its collaboration with the Korea Health Personnel Licensing Examination Institute to designate JEEHP as a co-official journal
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 33.     CrossRef
Research article
Similarity of the cut score in test sets with different item amounts using the modified Angoff, modified Ebel, and Hofstee standard-setting methods for the Korean Medical Licensing Examination  
Janghee Park, Mi Kyoung Yim, Na Jin Kim, Duck Sun Ahn, Young-Min Kim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:28.   Published online October 5, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.28
  • 4,474 View
  • 167 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The Korea Medical Licensing Exam (KMLE) typically contains a large number of items. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there is a difference in the cut score between evaluating all items of the exam and evaluating only some items when conducting standard-setting.
Methods
We divided the item sets that appeared on 3 recent KMLEs for the past 3 years into 4 subsets of each year of 25% each based on their item content categories, discrimination index, and difficulty index. The entire panel of 15 members assessed all the items (360 items, 100%) of the year 2017. In split-half set 1, each item set contained 184 (51%) items of year 2018 and each set from split-half set 2 contained 182 (51%) items of the year 2019 using the same method. We used the modified Angoff, modified Ebel, and Hofstee methods in the standard-setting process.
Results
Less than a 1% cut score difference was observed when the same method was used to stratify item subsets containing 25%, 51%, or 100% of the entire set. When rating fewer items, higher rater reliability was observed.
Conclusion
When the entire item set was divided into equivalent subsets, assessing the exam using a portion of the item set (90 out of 360 items) yielded similar cut scores to those derived using the entire item set. There was a higher correlation between panelists’ individual assessments and the overall assessments.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Application of computer-based testing in the Korean Medical Licensing Examination, the emergence of the metaverse in medical education, journal metrics and statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 2.     CrossRef
  • Possibility of using the yes/no Angoff method as a substitute for the percent Angoff method for estimating the cutoff score of the Korean Medical Licensing Examination: a simulation study
    Janghee Park
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 23.     CrossRef
  • Presidential address: Quarantine guidelines to protect examinees from coronavirus disease 2019, clinical skills examination for dental licensing, and computer-based testing for medical, dental, and oriental medicine licensing
    Yoon-Seong Lee
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 1.     CrossRef
  • Comparing the cut score for the borderline group method and borderline regression method with norm-referenced standard setting in an objective structured clinical examination in medical school in Korea
    Song Yi Park, Sang-Hwa Lee, Min-Jeong Kim, Ki-Hwan Ji, Ji Ho Ryu
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 25.     CrossRef
Software report
Introduction to the LIVECAT web-based computerized adaptive testing platform  
Dong Gi Seo, Jeongwook Choi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:27.   Published online September 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.27
  • 4,299 View
  • 113 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This study introduces LIVECAT, a web-based computerized adaptive testing platform. This platform provides many functions, including writing item content, managing an item bank, creating and administering a test, reporting test results, and providing information about a test and examinees. The LIVECAT provides examination administrators with an easy and flexible environment for composing and managing examinations. It is available at http://www.thecatkorea.com/. Several tools were used to program LIVECAT, as follows: operating system, Amazon Linux; web server, nginx 1.18; WAS, Apache Tomcat 8.5; database, Amazon RDMS—Maria DB; and languages, JAVA8, HTML5/CSS, Javascript, and jQuery. The LIVECAT platform can be used to implement several item response theory (IRT) models such as the Rasch and 1-, 2-, 3-parameter logistic models. The administrator can choose a specific model of test construction in LIVECAT. Multimedia data such as images, audio files, and movies can be uploaded to items in LIVECAT. Two scoring methods (maximum likelihood estimation and expected a posteriori) are available in LIVECAT and the maximum Fisher information item selection method is applied to every IRT model in LIVECAT. The LIVECAT platform showed equal or better performance compared with a conventional test platform. The LIVECAT platform enables users without psychometric expertise to easily implement and perform computerized adaptive testing at their institutions. The most recent LIVECAT version only provides a dichotomous item response model and the basic components of CAT. Shortly, LIVECAT will include advanced functions, such as polytomous item response models, weighted likelihood estimation method, and content balancing method.
Review
Levels, antecedents, and consequences of critical thinking among clinical nurses: a quantitative literature review  
Yongmi Lee, Younjae Oh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:26.   Published online September 7, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.26
  • 5,900 View
  • 192 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
The purpose of this study was to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of critical thinking within the clinical nursing context. In this review, we addressed the following specific research questions: what are the levels of critical thinking among clinical nurses?; what are the antecedents of critical thinking?; and what are the consequences of critical thinking? A narrative literature review was applied in this study. Thirteen articles published from July 2013 to December 2019 were appraised since the most recent scoping review on critical thinking among nurses was conducted from January 1999 to June 2013. The levels of critical thinking among clinical nurses were moderate or high. Regarding the antecedents of critical thinking, the influence of sociodemographic variables on critical thinking was inconsistent, with the exception that levels of critical thinking differed according to years of work experience. Finally, little research has been conducted on the consequences of critical thinking and related factors. The above findings highlight the levels, antecedents, and consequences of critical thinking among clinical nurses in various settings. Considering the significant association between years of work experience and critical thinking capability, it may be effective for organizations to deliver tailored education programs on critical thinking for nurses according to their years of work experience.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Critical thinking among clinical nurses and related factors: A survey study in public hospitals
    Eylül Urhan, Esperanza Zuriguel‐Perez, Arzu Kader Harmancı Seren
    Journal of Clinical Nursing.2022; 31(21-22): 3155.     CrossRef
  • Impact of Nurse–Physician Collaboration, Moral Distress, and Professional Autonomy on Job Satisfaction among Nurses Acting as Physician Assistants
    Yunmi Kim, Younjae Oh, Eunhee Lee, Shin-Jeong Kim
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(2): 661.     CrossRef
  • Development and validation of a script concordance test to assess biosciences clinical reasoning skills: A cross-sectional study of 1st year undergraduate nursing students
    Catherine Redmond, Aiden Jayanth, Sarah Beresford, Lorraine Carroll, Amy N.B. Johnston
    Nurse Education Today.2022; 119: 105615.     CrossRef
  • The nursing critical thinking in clinical practice questionnaire for nursing students: A psychometric evaluation study
    Esperanza Zuriguel-Pérez, María-Teresa Lluch-Canut, Montserrat Puig-Llobet, Luis Basco-Prado, Adrià Almazor-Sirvent, Ainoa Biurrun-Garrido, Mariela Patricia Aguayo-González, Olga Mestres-Soler, Juan Roldán-Merino
    Nurse Education in Practice.2022; 65: 103498.     CrossRef
  • Transition shock, preceptor support and nursing competency among newly graduated registered nurses: A cross-sectional study
    Feifei Chen, Yuan Liu, Xiaomin Wang, Hong Dong
    Nurse Education Today.2021; 102: 104891.     CrossRef
Research article
Training in statistical analysis reduces the framing effect among medical students and residents in Argentina  
Raúl Alfredo Borracci, Eduardo Benigno Arribalzaga, Jorge Thierer
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:25.   Published online September 1, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.25
  • 3,592 View
  • 112 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The framing effect refers to a phenomenon wherein, when the same problem is presented using different representations of information, people make significant changes in their decisions. This study aimed to explore whether the framing effect could be reduced in medical students and residents by teaching them the statistical concepts of effect size, probability, and sampling for use in the medical decision-making process.
Methods
Ninety-five second-year medical students and 100 second-year medical residents of Austral University and Buenos Aires University, Argentina were invited to participate in the study between March and June 2017. A questionnaire was developed to assess the different types of framing effects in medical situations. After an initial administration of the survey, students and residents were taught statistical concepts including effect size, probability, and sampling during 2 individual independent official biostatistics courses. After these interventions, the same questionnaire was randomly administered again, and pre- and post-intervention outcomes were compared among students and residents.
Results
Almost every type of framing effect was reproduced either in the students or in the residents. After teaching medical students and residents the analytical process behind statistical concepts, a significant reduction in sample-size, risky-choice, pseudo-certainty, number-size, attribute, goal, and probabilistic formulation framing effects was observed.
Conclusion
The decision-making of medical students and residents in simulated medical situations may be affected by different frame descriptions, and these framing effects can be partially reduced by training individuals in probability analysis and statistical sampling methods.
Opinion
Importance and utilization frequency of essential competencies of Korean physical therapists
Junghyun Choi, Taeyoung Oh, Jae Seop Oh, Wootaek Lim, Jeonhyeong Lee, Seul Ki Han, Yun Sang Park, Hyeok Gyu Kwon, Chang Sik Ahn
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:24.   Published online September 1, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.24
  • 4,189 View
  • 134 Download
PDFSupplementary Material
Review
Nurse educators’ experiences with student incivility: a meta-synthesis of qualitative studies  
Eun-Jun Park, Hyunwook Kang
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:23.   Published online August 11, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.23
  • 5,616 View
  • 193 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This study aimed to synthesize the best available qualitative research evidence on nurse educators’ experiences with student incivility in undergraduate nursing classrooms. A meta-synthesis of qualitative evidence using thematic synthesis was conducted. A systematic search was performed of 12 databases for relevant literature published by March 31, 2019. Two reviewers independently conducted critical quality appraisals using the checklist for qualitative research developed by the Joanna Briggs Institute. Eleven studies that met the inclusion criteria were selected for review. From the pooled study findings, 26 descriptive themes were generated and categorized into the following 5 analytical themes: (1) factors contributing to student incivility, (2) management of student incivility, (3) impact: professional and personal damage, (4) impact: professional growth, and (5) initiatives for the future. Many nurse educators became confident in their role of providing accountability as both educators and gatekeepers and experienced professional growth. However, others experienced damage to their personal and professional life and lost their motivation to teach. Nurse educators recommended the following strategies for preventing or better managing student incivility: institutional efforts by the university, unified approaches for student incivility within a nursing program, a faculty-to-faculty network for mentoring, and better teaching and learning strategies for individual educators. These strategies would help all nurse educators experience professional growth by successfully preventing and managing student incivility.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Experiences of undergraduate nursing students with faculty incivility in nursing classrooms: A meta-aggregation of qualitative studies
    Eun-Jun Park, Hyunwook Kang
    Nurse Education in Practice.2021; 52: 103002.     CrossRef
  • Can nursing educators learn to trust the world’s most trusted profession?
    Philip Darbyshire, David R. Thompson
    Nursing Inquiry.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Educational/faculty development material
Guidelines for the management of extravasation  
Jung Tae Kim, Jeong Yun Park, Hyun Jung Lee, Young Ju Cheon
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:21.   Published online August 10, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.21
  • 14,516 View
  • 637 Download
  • 17 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
The purpose of these practice guidelines is to offer and share strategies for preventing extravasation and measures for handling drugs known to cause tissue necrosis, which may occur even with the most skilled experts at intravenous (IV) injection. Herein, general knowledge about extravasation is first described, including its definition, incidence, risk factors, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and extravasation injuries. Management of extravasation includes nursing intervention and thermal application. At the first sign of extravasation, nursing intervention with following steps is recommended: stop administration of IV fluids immediately, disconnect the IV tube from the cannula, aspirate any remaining drug from the cannula, administer drug-specific antidote, and notify the physician. Local thermal treatments are used to decrease the site reaction and absorption of the infiltrate. Local cooling (ice packs) aids in vasoconstriction, theoretically limiting the drug dispersion. Although clear benefit has not been demonstrated with thermal applications, it remains a standard supportive care. The recommended application schedule for both warm and cold applications is 15 to 20 minutes, every 4 hours, for 24 to 48 hours. For prevention of extravasation, health professionals should be familiar with the extravasation management standard guidelines. They should regularly check the extravasation kit, assess patients’ sensory changes, tingling or burning, and always pay attention to patients’ words. The medical team’s continuous education on extravasation is essential. With the practical use of these guidelines, it is expected to reduce the occurrence rate of extravasation and contribute to patient care improvement.

Citations

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  • Cutaneous Management after Extravasation of High-Concentrated Amino Acid Solution Administered for Renal Protection in PRRT
    Chaninart Sakulpisuti, Wichana Chamroonrat, Supatporn Tepmongkol
    Tomography.2022; 8(1): 356.     CrossRef
  • An updated narrative review on the management of the most common oncological and hematological emergencies
    Ali Issani
    Disease-a-Month.2022; : 101355.     CrossRef
  • SOP Einteilung und Therapie von Paravasaten
    Svenja Wulf
    Onkologie up2date.2022; 4(02): 116.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of structured teaching programme on knowledge regarding management of extravasation of chemotherapeutic drugs
    Prakash Pooja, Chandra Ayush , Kotha Malathi , Das Santosh Kumar , Prakash Barsha , Chandra Avinash , Sherpa Gyaljin , Acharya Sudikshya
    Insights on the Depression and Anxiety.2022; 6(1): 018.     CrossRef
  • Intervenção de enfermagem perante o extravasamento de citostáticos - um contributo na prevenção da queimadura química
    Ana Marcelino, Marta Ganhão
    Onco.News.2022; (45): e067.     CrossRef
  • Yenidoğan yoğun bakım ünitesinde çalışan sağlık personelinin ekstravazasyon bilgi birikimi ve yönetimi
    Ayşen ORMAN, Yalçın ÇELİK, Nihan ÖZEL ERÇEL
    Mersin Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi.2022; : 465.     CrossRef
  • SOP Einteilung und Therapie von Paravasaten
    Svenja Wulf
    Frauenheilkunde up2date.2021; 15(02): 107.     CrossRef
  • Tissue distribution of epirubicin after severe extravasation in humans
    Jakob Nedomansky, Werner Haslik, Ursula Pluschnig, Christoph Kornauth, Christine Deutschmann, Stefan Hacker, Günther G. Steger, Rupert Bartsch, Robert M. Mader
    Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology.2021; 88(2): 203.     CrossRef
  • Novel Conformal Skin Patch with Embedded Thin-Film Electrodes for Early Detection of Extravasation
    Ruiqi Lim, Ramona B. Damalerio, Choon Looi Bong, Swee Kim Tan, Ming-Yuan Cheng
    Sensors.2021; 21(10): 3429.     CrossRef
  • Efficacy of combination of localized closure, ethacridine lactate dressing, and phototherapy in treatment of severe extravasation injuries: A case series
    Yan-Xu Lu, Ying Wu, Peng-Fei Liang, Rong-Chan Wu, Ling-Yun Tian, Hui-Ying Mo
    World Journal of Clinical Cases.2021; 9(18): 4599.     CrossRef
  • Modern approaches for long-term venous access in oncology
    Yu.V. Buydenok
    Onkologiya. Zhurnal imeni P.A.Gertsena.2021; 10(3): 69.     CrossRef
  • Elaboration and validation of an algorithm for treating peripheral intravenous infiltration and extravasation in children
    Luciano Marques dos Santos, Katharinne de Jesus Nunes, Cleonara Sousa Gomes e Silva, Denise Miyuki Kusahara, Elisa da Conceição Rodrigues, Ariane Ferreira Machado Avelar
    Revista Latino-Americana de Enfermagem.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Measuring the Validity and Reliability of the Vascular Access Complication Staging and Treatment Instrument in a Pediatric Population
    Genieveve J. Cline, Virginia Pohlod, Kristina J. Burger, Ernest K. Amankwah
    Journal of Infusion Nursing.2021; 44(4): 225.     CrossRef
  • Nurses’ knowledge and experience related to short peripheral venous catheter extravasation
    Selma Atay, Şengül Üzen Cura, Sevda Efil
    The Journal of Vascular Access.2021; : 112972982110455.     CrossRef
  • Chemotherapy Extravasation: Incidence of and Factors Associated With Events in a Community Cancer Center
    Nancy Ehmke
    Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing.2021; 25(6): 680.     CrossRef
  • Drug Extravasation in a Large General Hospital in Hunan, China: A Retrospective Survey
    Zhihong Gong, Jinghui Zhang, Jianmei Hou, Shujie Chen, Zixin Hu, Xiaoya Kong, Guiyuan Ma, Lingxia Luo
    Risk Management and Healthcare Policy.2021; Volume 14: 4931.     CrossRef
  • The Journal Citation Indicator has arrived for Emerging Sources Citation Index journals, including the Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions, in June 2021
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 20.     CrossRef
Research article
Self-care perspective taking and empathy in a student-faculty book club in the United States  
Rebecca Henderson, Melanie Gross Hagen, Zareen Zaidi, Valentina Dunder, Edlira Maska, Ying Nagoshi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:22.   Published online July 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.22
  • 5,012 View
  • 139 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
We aimed to study the impact of a combined faculty-student book club on education and medical practice as a part of the informal curriculum at the University of Florida College of Medicine in the United States.
Methods
Sixteen medical students and 7 faculties who participated in the book club were interviewed through phone and recorded. The interview was then transcribed and entered into the qualitative data analysis program QSR NVivo (QSR International, Burlington, MA, USA). The transcripts were reviewed, and thematic codes were developed inductively through collaborative iteration. Based on these preliminary codes, a coding dictionary was developed and applied to all interviews within QSR Nvivo to identify themes.
Results
Four main themes were identified from interviews: The first theme, the importance of literature to the development and maintenance of empathy and perspective-taking, and the second theme, the importance of the book club in promoting mentorship, personal relationships and professional development, were important to both student and faculty participants. The third and fourth themes, the need for the book club as a tool for self-care and the book club serving as a reminder about the world outside of school were discussed by student book club members.
Conclusion
Our study demonstrated that an informal book club has a significant positive impact on self-care, perspective-taking, empathy, and developing a “world outside of school” for medical school students and faculty in the United States. It also helps to foster meaningful relationships between students and faculty.

Citations

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  • Advancing book clubs as non-formal learning to facilitate critical public pedagogy in organizations
    Robin S Grenier, Jamie L Callahan, Kristi Kaeppel, Carole Elliott
    Management Learning.2022; 53(3): 483.     CrossRef
  • Not Just for Patrons: Book Club Participation as Professional Development for Librarians
    Laila M. Brown, Valerie Brett Shaindlin
    The Library Quarterly.2021; 91(4): 420.     CrossRef
  • Medical Students’ Creation of Original Poetry, Comics, and Masks to Explore Professional Identity Formation
    Johanna Shapiro, Juliet McMullin, Gabriella Miotto, Tan Nguyen, Anju Hurria, Minh Anh Nguyen
    Journal of Medical Humanities.2021; 42(4): 603.     CrossRef
Educational/faculty development material
Rules and guidelines for distancing in daily life to control coronavirus disease 2019 in Korea: 3rd version, announced on July 3, 2020  
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:20.   Published online July 13, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.20
  • 4,437 View
  • 146 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
In Korea, the first case of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was reported on January 21, 2020, after which the number of infected people began to increase. Intensive control measures stabilized the spread of COVID-19 in Korea. Therefore, the Korean government introduced the policy of “distancing in daily life” to support the maintenance of normal life starting on March 22, 2020. This policy provides rules and guidelines on distancing in daily life to facilitate the control of COVID-19 in Korea. “Distancing in daily life” refers to a new, sustainable way of life and social interactions that prepares society to face the possibility of long-term prevalence of COVID-19. These guidelines aim to achieve the goal of infection prevention and containment, while sustaining people’s everyday life, economic, and social activities. All members of society and communities are called upon to fulfill their respective responsibilities to combat the COVID-19 pandemic and to safeguard everyone’s health and well-being. Five key rules govern personal distancing in daily life: stay home for 3–4 days if you feel unwell; keep a distance of 2 arms’ length from others; wash your hands for 30 seconds and cough or sneeze into your sleeve; ventilate spaces at least twice a day and disinfect regularly; and stay connected while physically distancing. Collective distancing in daily life for communities and organizations is supported by these 5 key rules, and detailed guidelines are set out for different types of facilities. All individuals and communities are obliged to abide by these rules and guidelines for distancing as part of daily life.

Citations

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  • Social distance capacity to control the COVID-19 pandemic: A systematic review on time series analysis
    Omid Khosravizadeh, Bahman Ahadinezhad, Aisa Maleki, Zahra Najafpour, Rohollah Golmohammadi
    International Journal of Risk & Safety in Medicine.2022; 33(1): 5.     CrossRef
  • Anti-SARS-CoV-2 and anti-cytokine storm neutralizing antibody therapies against COVID-19: Update, challenges, and perspectives
    Cassiano Martin Batista, Leonardo Foti
    International Immunopharmacology.2021; 99: 108036.     CrossRef
  • Influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on Asian scholarly journal editors’ daily life, work, and opinions on future journal development
    Yeonok Chung, Sue Kim, Sun Huh
    Science Editing.2020; 7(2): 111.     CrossRef
  • Reflections as 2020 comes to an end: the editing and educational environment during the COVID-19 pandemic, the power of Scopus and Web of Science in scholarly publishing, journal statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 44.     CrossRef
Brief report
Impact of multi-professional simulation-based training on perceptions of safety and preparedness among health workers caring for coronavirus disease 2019 patients in Pakistan  
Jamal Azfar Khan, Muhammad Rizwan Bashir Kiani
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:19.   Published online June 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.19
  • 5,216 View
  • 190 Download
  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This study aimed to evaluate perceptions of safety and preparedness among health workers caring for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients before and after a multi-professional simulation-based course in Pakistan. Health workers’ perceptions of preparedness, safety, and their willingness to care for COVID-19 patients were measured before and after they attended a simulation-based training course to prepare them to care for COVID-19 patients at Combined Military Hospital Landi Kotal Cantt, from March 1 to April 30, 2020. The participants’ perceived level of safety and preparedness to care for COVID-19 patients before the simulation-based course was low, but increased after completing it (P<0.05). They felt confident and were significantly more willing to care for patients with COVID-19 or other infections requiring strict isolation. Simulation-based training is an effective tool to improve perceptions of risk and readiness to deal with COVID-19 among medical and non-medical health workers in Pakistan.

Citations

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  • COVID-19 Pandemic Support Programs for Healthcare Workers and Implications for Occupational Mental Health: A Narrative Review
    Eden David, Jonathan M. DePierro, Deborah B. Marin, Vanshdeep Sharma, Dennis S. Charney, Craig L. Katz
    Psychiatric Quarterly.2022; 93(1): 227.     CrossRef
  • How stressful was the COVID-19 pandemic for residents specializing in family practice?. A study of stressors and psychological well-being of physicians in further training specializing in family practice (GP trainees) within a pandemic context
    Anna-Maria von Oltersdorff-Kalettka, Janina Meinel, Karen Voigt, Thomas Mundt, Markus Bleckwenn, Antje Bergmann, Mandy Gottschall
    BMC Primary Care.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • An update on developments in medical education in response to the COVID-19 pandemic: A BEME scoping review: BEME Guide No. 64
    Michelle Daniel, Morris Gordon, Madalena Patricio, Ahmad Hider, Cameron Pawlik, Rhea Bhagdev, Shoaib Ahmad, Sebastian Alston, Sophie Park, Teresa Pawlikowska, Eliot Rees, Andrea Jane Doyle, Mohan Pammi, Satid Thammasitboon, Mary Haas, William Peterson, Ma
    Medical Teacher.2021; 43(3): 253.     CrossRef
  • Training in healthcare during and after COVID-19: proposal for simulation training
    Carolina Felipe Soares Brandão, Ellen Cristina Bergamasco, Gabriela Furst Vaccarezza, Maria Luiza Ferreira de Barba, Enrico Ferreira Martins de Andrade, Dario Cecilio-Fernandes
    Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira.2021; 67( suppl 1): 12.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 Critical Care Simulations: An International Cross-Sectional Survey
    Mohamad-Hani Temsah, Abdulkarim Alrabiaah, Ayman Al-Eyadhy, Fahad Al-Sohime, Abdullah Al Huzaimi, Nurah Alamro, Khalid Alhasan, Vaibhavi Upadhye, Amr Jamal, Fadi Aljamaan, Ali Alhaboob, Yaseen M. Arabi, Marc Lazarovici, Ali M. Somily, Abdulaziz M. Boker
    Frontiers in Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Interprofessional work in health in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic: a scoping review
    Sâmara Fontes Fernandes, Jaira Gonçalves Trigueiro, Márcio Adriano Fernandes Barreto, Rhanna Emanuela Fontenele Lima de Carvalho, Maria Rocineide Ferreira da Silva, Thereza Maria Magalhães Moreira, Marcelo Viana da Costa, Rodrigo Jácob Moreira de Freitas
    Revista da Escola de Enfermagem da USP.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of Simulation-Based Education on the Preparedness of Healthcare Professionals for the COVID-19 Pandemic: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Marc-André Maheu-Cadotte, Alexandra Lapierre, Guillaume Fontaine, Tanya Mailhot, Patrick Lavoie
    Science of Nursing and Health Practices.2021; 4(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Being Prepared During the Evolving COVID-19 Pandemic: A Neonatal Experience in Training and Simulation
    Juin Yee Kong, Srabani Samanta Bharadwaj, Amutha Chinnadurai, Selina Kah Ying Ho
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Reflections as 2020 comes to an end: the editing and educational environment during the COVID-19 pandemic, the power of Scopus and Web of Science in scholarly publishing, journal statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 44.     CrossRef
Research articles
Can incoming United States pediatric interns be entrusted with the essential communication skills of informed consent?  
Nicholas Sevey, Michelle Barratt, Emma Omoruyi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:18.   Published online June 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.18
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
According to the entrustable professional activities (EPA) for entering residency by the Association of American Medical Colleges, incoming residents are expected to independently obtain informed consent for procedures they are likely to perform. This requires residents to not only inform their patients but to ensure comprehension of that information. We assessed the communication skills demonstrated by 372 incoming pediatric interns between 2007 and 2018 at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, obtaining informed consent for a lumbar puncture.
Methods
During a simulated case in which interns were tasked with obtaining informed consent for a lumbar puncture, a standardized patient evaluated interns by rating 7 communication-based survey items using 5-point Likert scale from “poor” to “excellent.” We then converted the scale to a numerical system and calculated intern proficiency scores (sum of ratings for each resident) and average item performance (average item rating across all interns).
Results
Interns received an average rating of 21.6 per 28 maximum score, of which 227 interns (61.0%) achieved proficiency by scoring 21 or better. Notable differences were observed when comparing groups before and after EPA implementation (76.97% vs. 47.0% proficient, respectively). Item-level analysis showed that interns struggled most to conduct the encounter in a warm and friendly manner and encourage patients to ask questions (average ratings of 2.97/4 and 2.98/4, respectively). Interns excelled at treating the patient with respect and actively listening to questions (average ratings of 3.16, each). Both average intern proficiency scores and each average item ratings were significantly lower following EPA implementation (P<0.001).
Conclusion
Interns demonstrated moderate proficiency in communicating informed consent, though clear opportunities for improvement exist such as demonstrating warmth and encouraging questions.
Voluntary assignments during the pediatric clerkship to enhance the clinical experiences of medical students in the United States  
Conrad Krawiec, Abigail Kate Myers
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:17.   Published online May 27, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.17
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Pediatric clerkships that utilize off-campus clinical sites ensure clinical comparability by requiring completion of patient-focused tasks. Some tasks may not be attainable (especially off-campus); thus, they are not assigned. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of providing a voluntary assignment list to third-year medical students in their pediatric clerkship.
Methods
This is a retrospective single-center cross-sectional analysis of voluntary assignment completion during the 2019–2020 academic year. Third-year medical students were provided a voluntary assignment list (observe a procedure, use an interpreter phone to obtain a pediatric history, ask a preceptor to critique a clinical note, and follow-up on a patient after the rotation ends). Descriptive statistics were used to assess the timing and distribution of voluntary assignment completion.
Results
In total, 132 subjects (77 on the main campus, 55 off-campus) were included. Eighteen (13.6%) main-campus and 16 (12.1%) off-campus students completed at least 1 voluntary assignment. The following voluntary assignments were completed: observe a procedure (15, 11.4%), use an interpreter phone (26, 19.7%), ask a preceptor to critique a clinical note (12, 9.1%), and follow-up on a patient after the rotation ends (7, 5.3%). Off-campus students completed the assignments more often (29.1%) than on-campus students (23.4%)
Conclusion
Our clerkship values specific patient-focused tasks that may enhance student development, but are not attainable at all clinical sites. When provided a voluntary assignment list, 34 out of 132 students (25.8%) completed them. Clerkships that utilize off-campus sites should consider this approach to optimize the pediatric educational experience.
Correlation between physician assistant students’ performance score of history taking and physical exam documentation and scores of Graduate Record Examination, clinical year grade point average, and score of Physician Assistant National Certifying Exam in the United States  
Sara Lolar, Jamie McQueen, Sara Maher
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:16.   Published online May 27, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.16
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Learning to perform and document patient history taking and physical exam (H&P) entails a major component of the first year academic education of physician assistant (PA) students at Wayne State University, USA. The H&P is summative of multiple aspects of PA education, and students must master communication with patients and other health care providers. The objectives of this study were first, to determine if there was a correlation between scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) component testing and scores on graded H&Ps. The second objective was to identify a correlation between proficiency with H&P documentation and academic and clinical year grade point average (GPA) and Physician Assistant National Certifying Exam (PANCE) score.
Methods
Subjects included 147 PA students from Wayne State University from 2014–2016. PA students visited local hospitals or outpatient clinics during the academic year to perform and document patient H&Ps. Correlation between the H&P mean scores and GRE component scores, GPAs, and PANCE scores were analyzed.
Results
The subjects were 26.5 years-old (+6.5) and 111 females (75.5%). There was no correlation between the GRE component score and the H&P mean score. The H&P score was positively correlated with GPA 1 (r=0.512, P<0.001), with GPA 2 (r=0.425, P<0.001) and with PANCE score (r=0.448, P<0.001).
Conclusion
PA student skill with H&P documentation was positively related to academic performance score during PA school and achievement score on the PANCE at Wayne State University, USA.

Citations

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Patient as teacher sessions contextualize learning, enhancing knowledge, communication, and participation of pharmacy students in the United Kingdom  
Andrew Martin Lunn, Ann Urmston, Steven Seymour, Andrea Manfrin
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:15.   Published online May 20, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.15
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  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to evaluate the impact of Patient As Teacher (PAT) sessions on the knowledge, communication skills, and participation of pharmacy students in the United Kingdom.
Methods
During the academic year 2019–2020, year 1 and 2 pharmacy students at the University of Central Lancashire were invited to complete a questionnaire following PAT sessions. Data were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics, including mean and standard deviation for: continuous variables and reliability analysis. Pearson’s chi-square or Fisher exact test, odds ratio, and phi were used for analyzing dichotomous variables. Thematic analysis was used for free text comments.
Results
Sixty eight of 228 students participated (response rate of 29.8%). No statistical difference was found between gender (P=0.090); a statistically significant difference was found between year (P=0.008). Cronbach’s α (0.809) confirmed a good internal consistency. Ninety-seven percent of the students learned a lot, and 85.3% appreciated and valued the PAT sessions; 89.7% wanted more sessions. Ninety-two point seven percent perceived the sessions to contextualize their learning. Five questions were dichotomized by grouping the responses into negative and positive; 90.3% of responses were positive and did not show statistically significant differences in gender and year of study. Overall students’ free text comments were positive, but active listening and consultation appeared in the positive and negative domains, highlighting the need for more student engagement.
Conclusion
PAT sessions had a positive impact on students’ knowledge, communication skills and participation, and contextualized learning. They provide a valuable contribution to the pharmacy students’ experience in the United Kingdom.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Assessment of outcomes associated with a Moodle-based lesson design for a research course in pharmacy education: An experimental pilot process validation study
    Syed Wasif Gillani, Shabaz Mohiuddin Gulam, Jumana Al-Salloum, Rizah Anwar Assadi
    Pharmacy Education.2021; 21: 642.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions