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Editorial
Reflections as 2020 comes to an end: the editing and educational environment during the COVID-19 pandemic, the power of Scopus and Web of Science in scholarly publishing, journal statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
Sun Huh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:44.   Published online December 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.44
  • 3,311 View
  • 119 Download
  • 4 Citations
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Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Promotion to Top-Tier Journal and Development Strategy of the Annals of Laboratory Medicine for Strengthening its Leadership in the Medical Laboratory Technology Category: A Bibliometric Study
    Sun Huh
    Annals of Laboratory Medicine.2022; 42(3): 321.     CrossRef
  • Relationship between Educational Environment and Self-Directed Learning in Nursing Student in COVID-19 Pandemic
    Mahnaz Bahrami, Hakimeh Sabeghi, Mona Zohourparvaz, Hossein Karimi Moonaghi
    Journal of Medical Education Development.2022; 15(45): 47.     CrossRef
  • Open-source code to convert Journal Article Tag Suite Extensible Markup Language (JATS XML) to various viewers and other XML types for scholarly journal publishing
    Younsang Cho
    Science Editing.2022; 9(2): 162.     CrossRef
  • Was the number of submissions to scholarly journals in Korea affected by the COVID-19 pandemic?
    Sun Huh
    Science Editing.2021; 8(1): 117.     CrossRef
Brief report
Core elements of character education essential for doctors suggested by medical students in Korea: a preliminary study  
Yera Hur, Keumho Lee
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:43.   Published online December 21, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.43
  • 3,525 View
  • 101 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This preliminary study aimed to determine how medical students perceive character education in Korea. A structured survey questionnaire was distributed to 10 medical students between September and December 2018, of whom 6 students replied. Students’ responses were classified into elements, which were also categorized. Twenty-nine core elements of characters in 8 categories were verified as essential for doctors and as needs for character education. The most frequently suggested categories were “care and respect,” “empathy and communication,” and “responsibility and calling.” Participants also stated that various forms of character education are necessary and that they were not satisfied with the teaching methods of the character education that they had received. These results verified the most essential character traits for doctors and identified problems related to current character education. The results of this study will be helpful for preparing the character education curriculum in medical schools.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Medical students’ self-evaluation of character, and method of character education
    Yera Hur, Sanghee Yeo, Keumho Lee
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Definition of character for medical education based on expert opinions in Korea
    Yera Hur
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 26.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Clinical performance of medical students in Korea in a whole-task emergency station in the objective structured clinical examination with a standardized patient complaining of palpitations  
Song Yi Park, Hyun-Hee Kong, Min-Jeong Kim, Yoo Sang Yoon, Sang-Hwa Lee, Sunju Im, Ji-Hyun Seo
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:42.   Published online December 16, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.42
  • 3,206 View
  • 118 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This study assessed the clinical performance of 150 third-year medicalstudents in Busan, Korea in a whole-task emergency objective structured clinical examination station that simulated a patient with palpitations visiting the emergency department. The examination was conducted from November 25 to 27, 2019. Clinical performance was assessed as the number and percentage of students who performed history-taking (HT), a physical examination (PE), an electrocardiography (ECG) study, patient education (Ed), and clinical reasoning (CR), which were items on the checklist. It was found that 18.0% of students checked the patient’s pulse, 51.3% completed an ECG study, and 57.9% explained the results to the patient. A sizable proportion (38.0%) of students did not even attempt an ECG study. In a whole-task emergency station, students showed good performance on HT and CR, but unsatisfactory results for PE, ECG study, and Ed. Clinical skills educational programs for subjected student should focus more on PE, timely diagnostic tests, and sufficient Ed.

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Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Newly appointed medical faculty members’ self-evaluation of their educational roles at the Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine in 2020 and 2021: a cross-sectional survey-based study
    Sun Kim, A Ra Cho, Chul Woon Chung
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 28.     CrossRef
  • Comparing the cut score for the borderline group method and borderline regression method with norm-referenced standard setting in an objective structured clinical examination in medical school in Korea
    Song Yi Park, Sang-Hwa Lee, Min-Jeong Kim, Ki-Hwan Ji, Ji Ho Ryu
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 25.     CrossRef
Research articles
Development and validation of a measurement scale to assess nursing students’ readiness for the flipped classroom in Sri Lanka  
Punithalingam Youhasan, Yan Chen, Mataroria Lyndon, Marcus Alexander Henning
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:41.   Published online December 14, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.41
  • 4,184 View
  • 205 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The aim of this study was to develop and validate a scale to measure nursing students’ readiness for the flipped classroom in Sri Lanka.
Methods
A literature review provided the theoretical framework for developing the Nursing Students’ Readiness for Flipped Classroom (NSR-FC) questionnaire. Five content experts evaluated the NSR-FC, and content validity indices (CVI) were calculated. Cross-sectional surveys among 355 undergraduate nursing students from 3 state universities in Sri Lanka were carried out to assess the psychometric properties of the NSR-FC. Principal component analysis (PCA, n=265), internal consistency (using the Cronbach α coefficient, n=265), and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA, n=90) were done to test construct validity and reliability.
Results
Thirty-seven items were included in the NSR-FC for content validation, resulting in an average scale CVI of 0.94. Two items received item level CVI of less than 0.78. The factor structures of the 35 items were explored through PCA with orthogonal factor rotation, culminating in the identification of 5 factors. These factors were classified as technological readiness, environmental readiness, personal readiness, pedagogical readiness, and interpersonal readiness. The NSR-FC also showed an overall acceptable level of internal consistency (Cronbach α=0.9). CFA verified a 4-factor model (excluding the interpersonal readiness factor) and 20 items that achieved acceptable fit (standardized root mean square residual=0.08, root mean square error of approximation=0.08, comparative fit index=0.87, and χ2/degrees of freedom=1.57).
Conclusion
The NSR-FC, as a 4-factor model, is an acceptable measurement scale for assessing nursing students’ readiness for the flipped classroom in terms of its construct validity and reliability.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The intensivist's assessment of gastrointestinal function: A pilot study
    Varsha M. Asrani, Colin McArthur, Ian Bissett, John A. Windsor
    Australian Critical Care.2022; 35(6): 636.     CrossRef
  • Psychometric evidence of a perception scale about covid-19 vaccination process in Peruvian dentists: a preliminary validation
    César F. Cayo-Rojas, Nancy Córdova-Limaylla, Gissela Briceño-Vergel, Marysela Ladera-Castañeda, Hernán Cachay-Criado, Carlos López-Gurreonero, Alberto Cornejo-Pinto, Luis Cervantes-Ganoza
    BMC Health Services Research.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Assess the feasibility of flipped classroom pedagogy in undergraduate nursing education in Sri Lanka: A mixed-methods study
    Punithalingam Youhasan, Yan Chen, Mataroria Lyndon, Marcus A. Henning, Gwo-Jen Hwang
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(11): e0259003.     CrossRef
  • Newly appointed medical faculty members’ self-evaluation of their educational roles at the Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine in 2020 and 2021: a cross-sectional survey-based study
    Sun Kim, A Ra Cho, Chul Woon Chung
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 28.     CrossRef
Increased competency of registered dietitian nutritionists in physical examination skills after simulation-based education in the United States  
Elizabeth MacQuillan, Jennifer Ford, Kristin Baird
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:40.   Published online December 14, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.40
  • 2,834 View
  • 117 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to translate simulation-based dietitian nutritionist education to clinical competency attainment in a group of practicing registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs). Using a standardized instrument to measure performance on a newly-required clinical skill, the nutrition-focused physical exam (NFPE), competence was measured both before and after a simulation-based education (SBE) session.
Methods
Eighteen practicing RDNs were recruited by their employer, Spectrum Health. Following a pre-briefing session, participants completed an initial 10-minute encounter, performing NFPE on a standardized patient (SP). Next, participants completed a 90-minute SBE training session on skills within the NFPE, including hands-on practice and role play, followed by a post-training SP encounter. Video recordings of the SP encounters were scored to assess competence in 7 skill areas within the NFPE. Scores were analyzed for participants’ initial competence and change in competence.
Results
The proportions of participants with initial competence ranged from 0% to 44% across the 7 skill areas assessed. The only competency where participants initially scored in the “meets expectations” range was “approach to the patient.” When raw competence scores were assessed for changes from pre- to post-SBE training, the paired t-test indicated significant increases in all 7 competency areas following the simulation-based training (P<0.001).
Conclusion
This study showed the effectiveness of a SBE training program for increasing competence scores of practicing RDNs on a defined clinical skill.

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  • Barriers for Liver Transplant in Patients with Alcohol-Related Hepatitis
    Gina Choi, Jihane N. Benhammou, Jung J. Yum, Elena G. Saab, Ankur P. Patel, Andrew J. Baird, Stephanie Aguirre, Douglas G. Farmer, Sammy Saab
    Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology.2022; 12(1): 13.     CrossRef
Development and validation of a portfolio assessment system for medical schools in Korea  
Dong Mi Yoo, A Ra Cho, Sun Kim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:39.   Published online December 9, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.39
  • 3,296 View
  • 157 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Consistent evaluation procedures based on objective and rational standards are essential for the sustainability of portfolio-based education, which has been widely introduced in medical education. We aimed to develop and implement a portfolio assessment system, and to assess its validity and reliability.
Methods
We developed a portfolio assessment system from March 2019 to August 2019 and confirmed its content validity through expert assessment by an expert group comprising 2 medical education specialists, 2 professors involved in education at medical school, and a professor of basic medical science. Six trained assessors conducted 2 rounds of evaluation of 7 randomly selected portfolios for the “Self-Development and Portfolio II” course from January 2020 to July 2020. These data are used inter-rater reliability was evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) in September 2020.
Results
The portfolio assessment system is based on the following process; assessor selection, training, analytical/comprehensive evaluation, and consensus. Appropriately trained assessors evaluated portfolios based on specific assessment criteria and a rubric for assigning points. In the analysis of inter-rater reliability, the first round of evaluation grades was submitted, and all assessment areas except “goal-setting” showed a high ICC of 0.81 or higher. After the first round of assessment, we attempted to standardize objective assessment procedures. As a result, all components of the assessments showed close correlations, with ICCs of 0.81 or higher.
Conclusion
We confirmed that when assessors with an appropriate training conduct portfolio assessment based on specified standards through a systematic procedure, the results are reliable.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Development of an electronic learning progression dashboard to monitor student clinical experiences
    Hollis Lai, Nazila Ameli, Steven Patterson, Anthea Senior, Doris Lunardon
    Journal of Dental Education.2022; 86(6): 759.     CrossRef
  • Medical Student Portfolios: A Systematic Scoping Review
    Rei Tan, Jacquelin Jia Qi Ting, Daniel Zhihao Hong, Annabelle Jia Sing Lim, Yun Ting Ong, Anushka Pisupati, Eleanor Jia Xin Chong, Min Chiam, Alexia Sze Inn Lee, Laura Hui Shuen Tan, Annelissa Mien Chew Chin, Limin Wijaya, Warren Fong, Lalit Kumar Radha K
    Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development.2022; 9: 238212052210760.     CrossRef
Differences in nurses’ perceptions of self-reported pain and the administered morphine dose according to the patient’s facial expression in Korea  
Jeong Yun Park, Da In Lee
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:38.   Published online December 1, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.38
  • 3,283 View
  • 131 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to compare nurses’ perceptions of self-reported pain, the recorded pain score, and pain treatment according to the patient’s facial expression.
Methods
In this descriptive cross-sectional survey, the participants were 472 nurses working at a tertiary hospital in Seoul, Korea. A self-report questionnaire presented nurses with a smiling patient complaining of acute post-surgical pain and a grimacing patient with cancer pain, both of whom reported a pain level of 8 out of 10, and asked nurses to indicate their perception of the pain intensity, the pain score that they would record, and the medication that they would provide for each patient.
Results
The pain intensity perceived by nurses for the grimacing patient was significantly higher than that for the smiling patient (P<0.001). The recorded pain score was likewise significantly higher for the grimacing patient than for the smiling patient (P<0.001). There was a significant difference in the amount of morphine chosen by the nurses for pain interventions between the smiling and grimacing patients (P=0.040). Higher perceived pain intensity and score were associated with higher administered doses of morphine.
Conclusion
These findings suggest that nurses might be affected by patients’ facial expressions when treating pain. A pain management program should be developed that trains nurses to accurately recognize pain hidden in patients’ faces and provides them with the knowledge of how to appropriately assess and manage patients’ pain.
Female medical and nursing students’ knowledge, attitudes, and skills regarding breast self-examination in Oman: a comparison between pre- and post-training  
Rajani Ranganath, John Muthusami, Miriam Simon, Tatiyana Mandal, Meena Anand Kukkamulla
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:37.   Published online December 1, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.37
  • 3,636 View
  • 187 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. Educational and awareness programs impact early practices of breast self-examination, resulting in the early detection of cancer and thereby decreasing mortality. The study aimed to assess the levels of knowledge and awareness of breast cancer and breast self-examination among medical and nursing students in Oman and to compare their knowledge, attitudes, and skills after a training program.
Methods
This quasi-experimental study was carried out for female 90 medical and 80 nursing students in Oman in November 2019. A pre-test questionnaire was given before the training program and a post-test questionnaire was administered after the training program. Students’ knowledge, attitude, and skills regarding breast cancer and breast self-examination were compared. Scores for skills of practicing breast self-examination were compared between lecture and activity group and lecture-only group.
Results
Pre-test and post-test data were collected from 170 female students. Significant improvements were observed in the post-test scores for students’ knowledge, attitude, and skills after the intervention (P<0.001). The mean scores for skills of practicing breast self-examination after the lecture and the activity were higher than those obtained after the lecture only (P=0.014 for medical students and P=0.016 for nursing students).
Conclusion
An educational training program on breast cancer and breast examination with an emphasis on skills can motivate participants to perform breast self-examination regularly, and may therefore help students to train other women to perform breast self-examination for the early detection of breast cancer.
Key competencies for Korean nurses in prenatal genetic nursing: experiential genetic nursing knowledge, and ethics and law  
Gyeyoung Shin, Myunghee Jun, Hye-Kyung Kim, Michael Wreen, Sylvia Mimi Kubsch
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:36.   Published online November 26, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.36
  • 3,320 View
  • 128 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aims at determining the competencies of Korean nurses in prenatal genetic nursing.
Methods
First, a 3-round Delphi survey was conducted to establish prenatal genetic nursing competencies. Second, a prenatal genetic nursing education program (PGNEP), incorporating the findings from the Delphi survey, was designed. Third, a single group pre- and post-quasi-experimental study at a PGNEP workshop was conducted to assess the effectiveness of the integration of the competencies into the PGNEP with the measurements of knowledge about prenatal genetic testing and nursing (K-PGTN) and information needs about prenatal genetic testing and nursing (I-PGTN). Finally, the identified competencies were reexamined for their clarity.
Results
Based on the Delphi survey 78 competency components were identified. The components were then classified under 10 categories, which were organized under 4 domains. The domain of “experiential genetic nursing knowledge” and the domain of “ethics and law” were ranked as the first and the second in significance. The quasi-experimental study showed that the mean scores in K-PGTN were significantly increased from 8.19±2.67 to 11.25±2.51 (P<0.001). The mean scores of “ethics and law” in I-PGTN decreased significantly (P=0.023). The headings of 4 categories and 2 domains were revised.
Conclusion
This study identified competencies for prenatal genetic nursing and nursing education in Korea. There is a need for nursing instructors and researchers to improve the competencies of nurses in the identified areas. Particular emphasis should be placed on experiential nursing knowledge and on ethics and law related to prenatal genetic nursing.
Estimation of item parameters and examinees’ mastery probability in each domain of the Korean Medical Licensing Examination using a deterministic inputs, noisy “and” gate (DINA) model  
Younyoung Choi, Dong Gi Seo
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:35.   Published online November 17, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.35
  • 3,305 View
  • 84 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The deterministic inputs, noisy “and” gate (DINA) model is a promising statistical method for providing useful diagnostic information about students’ level of achievement, as educators often want to receive diagnostic information on how examinees did on each content strand, which is referred to as a diagnostic profile. The purpose of this paper was to classify examinees of the Korean Medical Licensing Examination (KMLE) in different content domains using the DINA model.
Methods
This paper analyzed data from the KMLE, with 360 items and 3,259 examinees. An application study was conducted to estimate examinees’ parameters and item characteristics. The guessing and slipping parameters of each item were estimated, and statistical analysis was conducted using the DINA model.
Results
The output table shows examples of some items that can be used to check item quality. The probabilities of mastery of each content domain were also estimated, indicating the mastery profile of each examinee. The classification accuracy and consistency for 8 content domains ranged from 0.849 to 0.972 and from 0.839 to 0.994, respectively. As a result, the classification reliability of the cognitive diagnosis model was very high for the 8 content domains of the KMLE.
Conclusion
This mastery profile can provide useful diagnostic information for each examinee in terms of each content domain of the KMLE. Individual mastery profiles allow educators and examinees to understand which domain(s) should be improved in order to master all domains in the KMLE. In addition, all items showed reasonable results in terms of item parameters.
Level of professional ethics awareness and medical ethics competency of dental hygienists and dental hygiene students: the need to add ethics items to the Korean Dental Hygienist Licensing Examination  
Yoon-Sook Hwang, Jong-Hwa Jang, Kyung-Hee Kang, Minji Kim, Jeong-Ran Park, Sohyun Son, Sun-Mi Lee, Da-Yee Jeung, Jung-Eun Ha, Su-Min Hong, Young-Eun Jang
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:34.   Published online November 17, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.34
  • 3,855 View
  • 125 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to evaluate the level of professional ethics awareness and medical ethics competency in order to assess the potential need for ethics items to be included on the Korean Dental Hygienist Licensing Examination.
Methods
In total, 358 clinical dental hygienists and dental hygiene students completed a structured questionnaire to evaluate their level of ethical awareness and medical ethics competency. The sub-factors of medical ethics were classified into relationships with patients, medical and social relations, and individual specialized fields.
Results
Only 32.1% of participants indicated that they had taken a course on professional ethics in the university curriculum, but 95.2% of respondents considered professional ethics to be important. The overall score for medical ethics competency was average (3.37 out of 5). The score for relationships with patients was 3.75 points, followed by medical and social relations (3.19 points) and individual specialized fields (3.16 points). The level of professional ethics awareness was higher among participants who had taken a course on professional ethics than among those who had not done so or who did not remember whether they had done so.
Conclusion
Dental hygienists were aware of the importance of professional ethics, but their medical ethics competency was moderate. Therefore, medical ethics should be treated as a required subject in the university curriculum, and medical ethics competency evaluations should be strengthened by adding ethics items to the Korean Dental Hygienist Licensing Examination.
Editorial
Special reviews on the history and future of the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation to memorialize its collaboration with the Korea Health Personnel Licensing Examination Institute to designate JEEHP as a co-official journal
Sun Huh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:33.   Published online October 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.33
  • 3,569 View
  • 86 Download
  • 2 Citations
PDFSupplementary Material

Citations

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  • Presidential address: Quarantine guidelines to protect examinees from coronavirus disease 2019, clinical skills examination for dental licensing, and computer-based testing for medical, dental, and oriental medicine licensing
    Yoon-Seong Lee
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 1.     CrossRef
  • Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation Presidential Address: the role of KIMEE as a medical education accreditation agency during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic
    Young Chang Kim
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 2.     CrossRef
Reviews
A proposal for the future of medical education accreditation in Korea  
Ki-Young Lim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:32.   Published online October 21, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.32
  • 3,349 View
  • 109 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
For the past 20 years, the medical education accreditation program of the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation (KIMEE) has contributed significantly to the standardization and improvement of the quality of basic medical education in Korea. It should now contribute to establishing and promoting the future of medical education. The Accreditation Standards of KIMEE 2019 (ASK2019) have been adopted since 2019, with the goal of achieving world-class medical education by applying a learner-centered curriculum using a continuum framework for the 3 phases of formal medical education: basic medical education, postgraduate medical education, and continuing professional development. ASK2019 will also be able to promote medical education that meets community needs and employs systematic assessments throughout the education process. These are important changes that can be used to gauge the future of the medical education accreditation system. Furthermore, globalization, inter-professional education, health systems science, and regular self-assessment systems are emerging as essential topics for the future of medical education. It is time for the medical education accreditation system in Korea to observe and adopt new trends in global medical education.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Definition of character for medical education based on expert opinions in Korea
    Yera Hur
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 26.     CrossRef
  • Special reviews on the history and future of the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation to memorialize its collaboration with the Korea Health Personnel Licensing Examination Institute to designate JEEHP as a co-official journal
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 33.     CrossRef
Is accreditation in medical education in Korea an opportunity or a burden?  
Hanna Jung, Woo Taek Jeon, Shinki An
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:31.   Published online October 21, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.31
  • 3,363 View
  • 98 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
The accreditation process is both an opportunity and a burden for medical schools in Korea. The line that separates the two is based on how medical schools recognize and utilize the accreditation process. In other words, accreditation is a burden for medical schools if they view the accreditation process as merely a formal procedure or a means to maintain accreditation status for medical education. However, if medical schools acknowledge the positive value of the accreditation process, accreditation can be both an opportunity and a tool for developing medical education. The accreditation process has educational value by catalyzing improvements in the quality, equity, and efficiency of medical education and by increasing the available options. For the accreditation process to contribute to medical education development, accrediting agencies and medical schools must first be recognized as partners of an educational alliance working together towards common goals. Secondly, clear guidelines on accreditation standards should be periodically reviewed and shared. Finally, a formative self-evaluation process must be introduced for institutions to utilize the accreditation process as an opportunity to develop medical education. This evaluation system could be developed through collaboration among medical schools, academic societies for medical education, and the accrediting authority.

Citations

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  • Internal evaluation in the faculties affiliated to zanjan university of medical sciences: Quality assurance of medical science education based on institutional accreditation
    Alireza Abdanipour, Farhad Ramezani‐Badr, Ali Norouzi, Mehdi Ghaemi
    Journal of Medical Education Development.2022; 15(46): 61.     CrossRef
  • Development of Mission and Vision of College of Korean Medicine Using the Delphi Techniques and Big-Data Analysis
    Sanghee Yeo, Seong Hun Choi, Su Jin Chae
    Journal of Korean Medicine.2021; 42(4): 176.     CrossRef
  • Special reviews on the history and future of the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation to memorialize its collaboration with the Korea Health Personnel Licensing Examination Institute to designate JEEHP as a co-official journal
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 33.     CrossRef
Current trend of accreditation within medical education  
Ducksun Ahn
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:30.   Published online October 21, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.30
  • 3,795 View
  • 115 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Currently, accreditation in medical education is a priority for many countries worldwide. The World Federation for Medical Education’s (WFME) launch of its 1st trilogy of standards in 2003 was a seminal event promoting accreditation in basic medical education (BME) globally. In parallel, the WFME also actively spearheaded a project to recognize accrediting agencies within individual countries. The introduction of competency-based medical education (CBME), with the 2 key concepts of entrusted professional activity and milestones, has enabled researchers to identify the relationships between patient outcomes and medical education. The recent data-driven approach to CBME has been used for ongoing quality improvement of trainees and training programs. The accreditation goal has shifted from the single purpose of quality assurance to balancing quality assurance and quality improvement. Although there are many types of postgraduate medical education (PGME), it may be possible to accredit resident programs on a global scale by adopting the concept of CBME. It will also be possible to achieve accreditation alignment for BME and PGME, which center on competency. This approach may also make it possible to measure accreditation outcomes against patient outcomes. Therefore, evidence of the advantages of costly and labor-consuming accreditation processes will be available soon, and quality improvement will be the driving force of the accreditation process.

Citations

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  • Public availability of information from officially accredited medical schools in China
    Shaowen Li, Kun Su, Peiwen Li, Yifei Sun, Ying Pan, Weimin Wang, Huixian Cui
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Special reviews on the history and future of the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation to memorialize its collaboration with the Korea Health Personnel Licensing Examination Institute to designate JEEHP as a co-official journal
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 33.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions