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Medical students’ thought process while solving problems in 3 different types of clinical assessments in Korea: clinical performance examination, multimedia case-based assessment, and modified essay question  
Sejin Kim, Ikseon Choi, Bo Young Yoon, Min Jeong Kwon, Seok-jin Choi, Sang Hyun Kim, Jong-Tae Lee, Byoung Doo Rhee
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:10.   Published online May 9, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.10
  • 15,245 View
  • 249 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to explore students’ cognitive patterns while solving clinical problems in 3 different types of assessments—clinical performance examination (CPX), multimedia case-based assessment (CBA), and modified essay question (MEQ)—and thereby to understand how different types of assessments stimulate different patterns of thinking.
Methods
A total of 6 test-performance cases from 2 fourth-year medical students were used in this cross-case study. Data were collected through one-on-one interviews using a stimulated recall protocol where students were shown videos of themselves taking each assessment and asked to elaborate on what they were thinking. The unit of analysis was the smallest phrases or sentences in the participants’ narratives that represented meaningful cognitive occurrences. The narrative data were reorganized chronologically and then analyzed according to the hypothetico-deductive reasoning framework for clinical reasoning.
Results
Both participants demonstrated similar proportional frequencies of clinical reasoning patterns on the same clinical assessments. The results also revealed that the three different assessment types may stimulate different patterns of clinical reasoning. For example, the CPX strongly promoted the participants’ reasoning related to inquiry strategy, while the MEQ strongly promoted hypothesis generation. Similarly, data analysis and synthesis by the participants were more strongly stimulated by the CBA than by the other assessment types.
Conclusion
This study found that different assessment designs stimulated different patterns of thinking during problem-solving. This finding can contribute to the search for ways to improve current clinical assessments. Importantly, the research method used in this study can be utilized as an alternative way to examine the validity of clinical assessments.

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  • Clinical Reasoning Training based on the analysis of clinical case using a virtual environment
    Sandra Elena Lisperguer Soto, María Soledad Calvo, Gabriela Paz Urrejola Contreras, Miguel Ángel Pérez Lizama
    Educación Médica.2021; 22(3): 139.     CrossRef
  • Newly appointed medical faculty members’ self-evaluation of their educational roles at the Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine in 2020 and 2021: a cross-sectional survey-based study
    Sun Kim, A Ra Cho, Chul Woon Chung
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 28.     CrossRef
Perceptions of the educational environment among undergraduate physical therapy students in a competency-based curriculum at the University of Chile  
Pablo Quiroga-Marabolí, Marcela Andrea Antúnez-Riveros, Marcela Aguirre-Jerez, Alvaro Besoain Saldaña, José Peralta-Camposano, María Pilar Ruiz de Gauna Bahillo
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:9.   Published online April 29, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.9
  • 14,505 View
  • 262 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to assess the educational environment (EE) among students in a physical therapy undergraduate program, to identify patterns in EE perceptions among the students by year, and to determine issues that should be addressed.
Methods
The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) questionnaire was used to explore the relationships among the total mean score, subscales, and items in a competency-based curriculum in the physical therapy program at the University of Chile. The DREEM questionnaire was filled out by 166 of 244 students (68.03%), of whom 56.6% were men and 43.4% were women, with 75.9% between 19 and 23 years of age.
Results
The total mean score (120.9/200) indicated that the EE was perceived as ‘more positive than negative.’ There were significant differences (P<0.05) between first-year students (113.41), who reported the lowest total mean score, and fourth-year students (126.60), who had the highest total mean score. Students rated their EE favorably on each subscale except social self-perceptions, which second-year students rated as ‘not too bad,’ and for which first-, third-, and fourth-year students gave a rating corresponding to ‘not a nice place.’ On the perceptions of teachers subscale, there were significant differences (P<0.05) between first-year students (28.05/44) and fourth-year students (32.24/44) and between second-year students (28.72/44) and fourth-year students (32.24/44). On the academic self-perceptions subscale, there were significant differences (P<0.05) between first-year students (18.12/32) and second-year (21.68/32), third-year (22.33/32), and fourth-year students (21.87/32).
Conclusion
Physical therapy students at the University of Chile had positive perceptions of their EE. First-year students rated the largest number of items as problematic. Improvements are required across the program in the specific subscales mentioned above.

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  • Perspective of educational environment on students’ perception of teaching and learning
    Falguni Singh, Monika Saini, Ashish Kumar, Seeram Ramakrishna, Mousumi Debnath
    Learning Environments Research.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Role of Teaching Hospital Characteristic in Achievement of Doctor Competency in Universitas Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta
    S A T S Estri, A Majdawati, W Kusumawati
    Journal of Physics: Conference Series.2020; 1471(1): 012038.     CrossRef
  • Perception of clinical educational environment by student of physiotherapy based on the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measurement Questionnaire in Chile
    Karen Córdova-León, Lincoyán Fernández-Huerta, Marcela Rojas-Vargas
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2019; 16: 16.     CrossRef
Development and validation of the Hocus Focus Magic Performance Evaluation Scale for health professions personnel in the United States  
Kevin Spencer, Hon Keung Yuen, Max Darwin, Gavin Jenkins, Kimberly Kirklin
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:8.   Published online April 10, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.8
  • 16,976 View
  • 207 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study was conducted to describe the development and validation of the Hocus Focus Magic Performance Evaluation Scale (HFMPES), which is used to evaluate the competency of health professions personnel in delivering magic tricks as a therapeutic modality.
Methods
A 2-phase validation process was used. Phase I (content validation) involved 16 magician judges who independently rated the relevance of each of the 5 items in the HFMPES and established the veracity of its content. Phase II evaluated the psychometric properties of the HFMPES. This process involved 2 magicians using the HFMPES to independently evaluate 73 occupational therapy graduate students demonstrating 3 magic tricks.
Results
The HFMPES achieved an excellent scale-content validity index of 0.99. Exploratory factor analysis of the HFMPES scores revealed 1 distinct factor with alpha coefficients ≥0.8 across the 3 magic tricks. The construct validity of the HFMPES scores was further supported by evidence from a known-groups analysis, in which the Mann–Whitney U-test showed significant difference in HFMPES scores between participants with different levels of experience in delivering the 3 magic tricks. The inter-rater reliability coefficients were ≥0.75 across the 3 magic tricks, indicating that the competency of health professions personnel in delivering the 3 magic tricks could be evaluated precisely.
Conclusion
Preliminary evidence supported the content and construct validity of the HFMPES, which was found to have good internal consistency and inter-rater reliability in evaluating health professions personnel’s competency in delivering magic tricks.

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  • MAGNITIVE: Effectiveness and Feasibility of a Cognitive Training Program Through Magic Tricks for Children With Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder. A Second Clinical Trial in Community Settings
    Saray Bonete, Ángela Osuna, Clara Molinero, Inmaculada García-Font
    Frontiers in Psychology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Contribution of a virtual magic camp to enhancing self-esteem in children with ADHD: A pilot study
    Hon K. Yuen, Kevin Spencer, Kimberly Kirklin, Lauren Edwards, Gavin R. Jenkins
    Health Psychology Research.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of a Magic Camp for Children with Hemiparesis: A Pilot Study
    Kevin Spencer, Hon K. Yuen, Gavin R. Jenkins, Kimberly Kirklin, Angla R. Griffin, Laura K. Vogtle, Drew Davis
    Occupational Therapy In Health Care.2020; 34(2): 155.     CrossRef
An expert-led and artificial intelligence system-assisted tutoring course to improve the confidence of Chinese medical interns in suturing and ligature skills: a prospective pilot study  
Ying-Ying Yang, Boaz Shulruf
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:7.   Published online April 10, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.7
  • 16,510 View
  • 250 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Lack of confidence in suturing/ligature skills due to insufficient practice and assessments is common among novice Chinese medical interns. This study aimed to improve the skill acquisition of medical interns through a new intervention program.
Methods
In addition to regular clinical training, expert-led or expert-led plus artificial intelligence (AI) system tutoring courses were implemented during the first 2 weeks of the surgical block. Interns could voluntarily join the regular (no additional tutoring), expert-led tutoring, or expert-led+AI tutoring groups freely. In the regular group, interns (n=25) did not receive additional tutoring. The expert-led group received 3-hour expert-led tutoring and in-training formative assessments after 2 practice sessions. After a similar expert-led course, the expert-led+AI group (n=23) practiced and assessed their skills on an AI system. Through a comparison with the internal standard, the system automatically recorded and evaluated every intern’s suturing/ligature skills. In the expert-led+AI group, performance and confidence were compared between interns who participated in 1, 2, or 3 AI practice sessions.
Results
The end-of-surgical block objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) performance and self-assessed confidence in suturing/ligature skills were highest in the expert-led+AI group. In comparison with the expert-led group, the expert-led+AI group showed similar performance in the in-training assessment and greater improvement in the end-of-surgical block OSCE. In the expert-led+AI group, the best performance and highest post-OSCE confidence were noted in those who engaged in 3 AI practice sessions.
Conclusion
This pilot study demonstrated the potential value of incorporating an additional expert-led+AI system–assisted tutoring course into the regular surgical curriculum.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Artificial Intelligence Methods and Artificial Intelligence-Enabled Metrics for Surgical Education: A Multidisciplinary Consensus
    S Swaroop Vedula, Ahmed Ghazi, Justin W Collins, Carla Pugh, Dimitrios Stefanidis, Ozanan Meireles, Andrew J Hung, Steven Schwaitzberg, Jeffrey S Levy, Ajit K Sachdeva
    Journal of the American College of Surgeons.2022; 234(6): 1181.     CrossRef
  • The use and future perspective of Artificial Intelligence—A survey among German surgeons
    Mathieu Pecqueux, Carina Riediger, Marius Distler, Florian Oehme, Ulrich Bork, Fiona R. Kolbinger, Oliver Schöffski, Peter van Wijngaarden, Jürgen Weitz, Johannes Schweipert, Christoph Kahlert
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Application of Artificial Intelligence in Medicine: An Overview
    Peng-ran Liu, Lin Lu, Jia-yao Zhang, Tong-tong Huo, Song-xiang Liu, Zhe-wei Ye
    Current Medical Science.2021; 41(6): 1105.     CrossRef
  • Artificial Intelligence Education and Tools for Medical and Health Informatics Students: Systematic Review
    A Hasan Sapci, H Aylin Sapci
    JMIR Medical Education.2020; 6(1): e19285.     CrossRef
  • Scientific Development of Educational Artificial Intelligence in Web of Science
    Antonio-José Moreno-Guerrero, Jesús López-Belmonte, José-Antonio Marín-Marín, Rebeca Soler-Costa
    Future Internet.2020; 12(8): 124.     CrossRef
  • An Educational Network for Surgical Education Supported by Gamification Elements: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial
    Natasha Guérard-Poirier, Michèle Beniey, Léamarie Meloche-Dumas, Florence Lebel-Guay, Bojana Misheva, Myriam Abbas, Malek Dhane, Myriam Elraheb, Adam Dubrowski, Erica Patocskai
    JMIR Research Protocols.2020; 9(12): e21273.     CrossRef
Attitudes toward rehabilitating inmates among occupational therapy students in the United States  
Sarah Catherine Tucker, Hon Keung Yuen
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:6.   Published online March 25, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.6
  • 17,621 View
  • 286 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study was to examine occupational therapy (OT) students’ attitudes toward rehabilitating inmates and validate an instrument used to measure their attitudes.
Methods
OT students (n=128) from one university in Alabama, United States, completed an online survey exploring their attitudes toward rehabilitating inmates, which was assessed using the Rehabilitation Orientation Scale (ROS), a 7-point scale. Dimensional structure, internal consistency reliability, construct validity, and relations to other variables of the ROS was evaluated using factor analyses, Cronbach’s alpha, known-groups method, and univariable correlations, respectively.
Results
Unidimensionality of the ROS was confirmed with an alpha coefficient of 0.90. The mean ROS score of the respondents was 5.1; a score toward 7 indicated a more supportive attitude. About 60% of the respondents reported supportive attitudes (i.e., an ROS score ≥5). Respondents’ ROS scores were significantly higher than those of the public and criminal justice professionals. Female students reported a more supportive attitude than males. Multiple regression analysis indicated that respondents’ consideration of working in prison settings after graduation and their perception that OT has a role in prison settings were significantly associated with support for rehabilitating inmates, after controlling for gender and an acquaintance with someone who has been incarcerated.
Conclusion
Results indicated that the ROS demonstrated adequate psychometric properties as it applied to this population. The majority of respondents reported supportive attitudes toward rehabilitating inmates. Consideration of working in prison settings after graduation and the perception that OT has a role in prison settings were 2 independent factors associated with respondents’ attitudes toward rehabilitating inmates.

Citations

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  • Justice-Based Occupational Therapy: A Scoping Review
    Jaime P. Muñoz, Abigail Catalano, Yinao Wang, Gesina A. Phillips
    Annals of International Occupational Therapy.2020; 3(4): 162.     CrossRef
Preadmission predictors of graduation success from a physical therapy education program in the United States  
Gretchen Roman, Matthew Paul Buman
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:5.   Published online February 26, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.5
  • 17,443 View
  • 349 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The field of physical therapy education is seeking an evidence-based approach for admitting qualified applicants, as previous research has assessed various outcomes, impeding practical application. This study was conducted to identify preadmission criteria predictive of graduation success.
Methods
Data from the 2013–2016 graduating cohorts (n=149) were collected. Predictors included verbal Graduate Record Examination rank percentile (VGRE%), quantitative GRE rank percentile, and analytical GRE rank percentile, the admissions interview, precumulative science grade point average (SGPA), precumulative grade point average (UGPA), and a reflective essay. The National Physical Therapy Examination (NPTE) and grade point average at the time of graduation (GGPA) were used as measures of graduation success. Two separate mixed-effects models determined the associations of preadmission predictors with NPTE performance and GGPA.
Results
The NPTE model fit comparison showed significant results (degrees of freedom [df]=10, P=0.001), decreasing within-cohort variance by 59.5%. NPTE performance were associated with GGPA (β=125.21, P=0.001), and VGRE%, the interview, the essay, and GGPA (P≤0.001) impacted the model fit. The GGPA model fit comparison did not show significant results (df=8, P=0.56), decreasing within-cohort variance by 16.4%. The GGPA was associated with the interview (β=0.02, P=0.04) and UGPA (β=0.25, P=0.04), and VGRE%, the interview, UGPA, and the essay (P≤0.02) impacted model fit.
Conclusion
In our findings, GGPA predicted NPTE performance, and the interview and UGPA predicted GGPA. Unlike past evidence, SGPA showed no predictive power. The essay and VGRE% warrant attention because of their influence on model fit. We recommend that admissions ranking matrices place a greater weight on the interview, UGPA, VGRE%, and essay.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Predictors of Success on the National Physical Therapy Examination in 2 US Accelerated-Hybrid Doctor of Physical Therapy Programs
    Breanna Reynolds, Casey Unverzagt, Alex Koszalinski, Roberta Gatlin, Jill Seale, Kendra Gagnon, Kareaion Eaton, Shane L. Koppenhaver
    Journal of Physical Therapy Education.2022; 36(3): 225.     CrossRef
  • Predictors of National Physical Therapy Examination Failure in Graduates of a Blended Doctor of Physical Therapy Program
    Melissa J. Lazinski, Kathleen Rockefeller, M. Samuel Cheng
    Journal of Physical Therapy Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Predicting graduate student performance – A case study
    Jinghua Nie, Ashrafee Hossain
    Journal of Further and Higher Education.2021; 45(4): 524.     CrossRef
  • A Proposed Framework for Increasing Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Communication Sciences and Disorders Academic Programs: The REAP Model
    Bijoyaa Mohapatra, Ranjini Mohan
    Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.2021; 6(4): 755.     CrossRef
  • Doctor of Physical Therapy Student Grit as a Predictor of Academic Success: A Pilot Study
    Rebecca Bliss, Erin Jacobson
    Health Professions Education.2020; 6(4): 522.     CrossRef
Cultural immersion in the education of healthcare professionals: a systematic review  
Marty J. Brock, Levi B. Fowler, Johnathan G. Freeman, Devan C. Richardson, Lisa J. Barnes
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:4.   Published online January 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.4
  • 26,694 View
  • 379 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
With the ever-changing cultural makeup of society, the ability to deliver culturally appropriate healthcare is essential. An educational method aimed at increasing cultural knowledge and sensitivity in the education of healthcare professionals is cultural immersion, which creates opportunities for transformational learning through direct interactions with culturally diverse populations. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the qualitative effects of cultural immersion experiences on graduate-level healthcare professional students.
Methods
A search of the CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) and ERIC (Education Resources Information Center) databases was performed, utilizing search terms including cultural immersion, cultural sensitivity, educational outcomes, and healthcare professionals. The search was limited to publications within the last 10 years. The articles were screened according to title, abstract, and full-text following the application of inclusion/exclusion criteria. Themes identified within each article were collected and categorized, using a qualitative methodology, into 5 overarching domains to assess the educational experiences. Studies were scored for quality using the qualitative portion of the McGill Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool–2011.
Results
Nine studies incorporating a total of 94 participants with experiences in 14 culturally diverse environments revealing 47 individually identified themes were included in the review. The results indicated that all cultural immersion experiences stimulated increased cultural awareness and sensitivity.
Conclusion
Cultural immersion experiences produced a positive, multi-domain effect on cultural learning in students of the health professions. The results of this review provide support for implementing cultural immersion experiences into the education of healthcare professionals with the goal of increasing cultural sensitivity.

Citations

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  • From the World to Western: A Community-Engaged Teaching Strategy to Enhance Students’ Learning of Cultural Issues Relevant to Healthcare
    Olayide Ogunsiji, Anita Eseosa Ogbeide, Valentine Mukuria, Florence Olugbemiro, Alex Workman, Tinashe Dune
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(9): 5114.     CrossRef
  • HIV Stigma Reduction Interventions Among Health Care Providers and Students in Different Countries: A Systematic Review
    Mona Mohammadifirouzeh, Kyeung Mi Oh, Susan Tanner
    Current HIV Research.2022; 20(1): 20.     CrossRef
  • Educating future professionals in perinatal medicine: the attitude of medical and nursing students towards childbirth
    Ernesto González-Mesa, Olga Cazorla-Granados, Marta Blasco-Alonso, Lorena Sabonet, Jesús S. Jiménez-López, Cristóbal Rengel-Díaz
    Journal of Perinatal Medicine.2021; 49(4): 485.     CrossRef
  • Learning objectives of cultural immersion programs: A scoping review
    Kate Buchanan, Marrianne Velandia, Marina Weckend, Sara Bayes
    Nurse Education Today.2021; 100: 104832.     CrossRef
  • Using internationalization-at-home activities to enhance the cultural awareness of health and social science research students: A mixed-method study
    Doris Y. Leung, Christine Kumlien, Melanie Bish, Elisabeth Carlson, Pui Sze Chan, E. Angela Chan
    Nurse Education Today.2021; 100: 104851.     CrossRef
  • An Opportunity to Integrate Cultural Sensitivity Training Into the Doctor of Pharmacy Curriculum
    Anna Haas-Gehres, Ed Portillo, Marlowe Djuric Kachlic, Anita Siu
    American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education.2021; 85(7): 8459.     CrossRef
  • Educating for diversity, equity, and inclusion: A review of commonly used educational approaches
    Leonor Corsino, Anthony T. Fuller
    Journal of Clinical and Translational Science.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Fostering cultural responsiveness in physiotherapy: curricula survey of Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand physiotherapy programs
    Maxine Te, Felicity Blackstock, Lucy Chipchase
    BMC Medical Education.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
Comparison of the effects of simulated patient clinical skill training and student roleplay on objective structured clinical examination performance among medical students in Australia  
Silas Taylor, Matthew Haywood, Boaz Shulruf
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:3.   Published online January 11, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.3
  • 19,345 View
  • 374 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Optimal methods for communication skills training (CST) are an active research area, but the effects of CST on communication performance in objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) has not been closely studied. Student roleplay (RP) for CST is common, although volunteer simulated patient (SP) CST is cost-effective and provides authentic interactions. We assessed whether our volunteer SP CST program improved OSCE performance compared to our previous RP strategy.
Methods
We performed a retrospective, quasi-experimental study of 2 second-year medical student cohorts’ OSCE data in Australia. The 2014 cohort received RP-only CST (N=182) while the 2016 cohort received SP-only CST (N=148). The t-test and analysis of variance were used to compare the total scores in 3 assessment domains: generic communication, clinical communication, and physical examination/procedural skills.
Results
The baseline characteristics of groups (scores on the Australian Tertiary Admission Rank, Undergraduate Medicine and Health Sciences Admission Test, and medicine program interviews) showed no significant differences between groups. For each domain, the SP-only CST group demonstrated superior OSCE outcomes, and the difference between cohorts was significant (P<0.01). The superiority of volunteer SP CST over student RP CST in terms of OSCE performance outcomes was found for generic communication, clinical communication, and physical examination/procedural skills.
Conclusion
The better performance of the SP cohort in physical examination/procedural skills might be explained by the requirement for patient compliance and cooperation, facilitated by good generic communication skills. We recommend a volunteer SP program as an effective and efficient way to improve CST among junior medical students.

Citations

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  • Application of objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) for the evaluation of Kampo medicine training
    Marie Amitani, Haruka Amitani, Hajime Suzuki, Suguru Kawazu, Kimiko Mizuma, Kojiro Yamaguchi, Toshimichi Oki, Hideaki Nitta, Takuro Sonoda, Keiko Kawano, Yasuhiro Tanaka, Nanami Uto, Rie Ibusuki, Ryutaro Arita, Shin Takayama, Tadamichi Mitsuma, Toshiro Ta
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A cost analysis of a 5-day simulation-based learning program for speech-language pathology student training
    Elizabeth C. Ward, Emma Caird, Saval Khanal, Sanjeewa Kularatna, Joshua Byrnes, Adriana Penman, Sue Mcallister, Stacey Baldac, Elizabeth Cardell, Rachel Davenport, Bronwyn Davidson, Sally Hewat, Simone Howells, Patricia Mccabe, Alison Purcell, Joanne Walt
    International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Improved detection of patient centeredness in objective structured clinical examinations through authentic scenario design
    Kye-Yeung Park, Hoon-Ki Park, Hwan-Sik Hwang, Sang-Ho Yoo, Jae-Sook Ryu, Jong-Hoon Kim
    Patient Education and Counseling.2021; 104(5): 1094.     CrossRef
  • Interventions for improving medical students' interpersonal communication in medical consultations
    Conor Gilligan, Martine Powell, Marita C Lynagh, Bernadette M Ward, Chris Lonsdale, Pam Harvey, Erica L James, Dominique Rich, Sari P Dewi, Smriti Nepal, Hayley A Croft, Jonathan Silverman
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Empirical analysis comparing the tele-objective structured clinical examination and the in-person assessment in Australia
    Jonathan Zachary Felthun, Silas Taylor, Boaz Shulruf, Digby Wigram Allen
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 23.     CrossRef
  • Raising rare disease awareness using red flags, role play simulation and patient educators: results of a novel educational workshop on Raynaud phenomenon and systemic sclerosis
    S. Sanges, M.-M. Farhat, M. Assaraf, J. Galland, E. Rivière, C. Roubille, M. Lambert, C. Yelnik, H. Maillard, V. Sobanski, G. Lefèvre, D. Launay, S. Morell-Dubois, E. Hachulla
    Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Improved clinical communication OSCE scores after simulation-based training: Results of a comparative study
    Alexandre Nuzzo, Alexy Tran-Dinh, Marie Courbebaisse, Hugo Peyre, Patrick Plaisance, Alexandre Matet, Brigitte Ranque, Albert Faye, Victoire de Lastours, Conor Gilligan
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(9): e0238542.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of students' performance of objective structured clinical examination during clinical practice
    Jihye Yu, Sukyung Lee, Miran Kim, Janghoon Lee
    Korean Journal of Medical Education.2020; 32(3): 231.     CrossRef
Editorial
Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions will be accepted for inclusion in Scopus
Sun Huh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:2.   Published online January 7, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.2
  • 18,535 View
  • 265 Download
  • 3 Citations
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  • Promotion to Top-Tier Journal and Development Strategy of the Annals of Laboratory Medicine for Strengthening its Leadership in the Medical Laboratory Technology Category: A Bibliometric Study
    Sun Huh
    Annals of Laboratory Medicine.2022; 42(3): 321.     CrossRef
  • PubMed Central as a platform for the survival of open-access biomedical society journals published in Korea
    Sun Huh
    Science Editing.2021; 8(2): 153.     CrossRef
  • Presidential address: demonstration of the international leadership of the Korea Health Personnel Licensing Examination Institute, introduction of a clinical skills test to the Korean dental licensing examination, and strengthening of ethics items on lice
    Yoon-Seong Lee
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2019; 16: 15.     CrossRef
Announcement
Introduction to the 2019 World Federation for Medical Education World Conference
Duck-Sun Ahn
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:1.   Published online January 2, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.1
  • 16,497 View
  • 215 Download
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Editorials
Updates from 2018: Being indexed in Embase, becoming an affiliated journal of the World Federation for Medical Education, implementing an optional open data policy, adopting principles of transparency and best practice in scholarly publishing, and appreciation to reviewers
Sun Huh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:36.   Published online December 28, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.36
  • 15,386 View
  • 152 Download
  • 6 Citations
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Citations

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  • Position of Ultrasonography in the scholarly journal network based on bibliometrics and developmental strategies for it to become a top-tier journal
    Sun Huh
    Ultrasonography.2020; 39(3): 238.     CrossRef
  • How Annals of Dermatology Has Improved the Scientific Quality and Ethical Standards of its Articles in the Two-Year Period since October 2018
    Sun Huh
    Annals of Dermatology.2020; 32(5): 353.     CrossRef
  • Special reviews on the history and future of the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation to memorialize its collaboration with the Korea Health Personnel Licensing Examination Institute to designate JEEHP as a co-official journal
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 33.     CrossRef
  • Is it possible to foster first-rate publishers through a journal publishing cooperative in Korea?
    Sun Huh
    Archives of Plastic Surgery.2019; 46(01): 3.     CrossRef
  • Protection of Personal Information in Medical Journal Publications
    Sun Huh
    Neurointervention.2019; 14(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Journal statistics, coping strategy with upcoming scholarly journal publishing environment including Plan-S, and appreciation for reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2019; 16: 41.     CrossRef
Bibliometric and content analysis of Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions in 2018
Yera Hur
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:35.   Published online December 28, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.35
  • 15,753 View
  • 154 Download
  • 1 Citations
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  • Promotion to Top-Tier Journal and Development Strategy of the Annals of Laboratory Medicine for Strengthening its Leadership in the Medical Laboratory Technology Category: A Bibliometric Study
    Sun Huh
    Annals of Laboratory Medicine.2022; 42(3): 321.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Personality-oriented job analysis to identify non-cognitive factors predictive of performance in a doctor of physical therapy program in the United States  
Maureen Conard, Kristin Schweizer
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:34.   Published online December 28, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.34
  • 17,441 View
  • 235 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This study aimed to conduct a personality-oriented job analysis to identify non-cognitive factors that may predict successful performance or performance difficulties in doctor of physical therapy (DPT) students. The study employed focus groups and a survey with 9 DPT subject matter experts. The focus group participants, who included 3 DPT faculty members and 4 recent graduates of the DPT program, identified 22 non-cognitive factors. Fifteen of these factors were thought to be possibly associated with successful performance and 7 factors were thought to be possibly associated with performance difficulties. Administration of a questionnaire employing the combination job analysis method resulted in 12 factors that could be used in selection, and 10 that could be incorporated into training. The present study employed an established job analysis method using subject matter experts to identify a broad array of factors that go beyond what previous studies have examined, and which may predict success or difficulties in a DPT program.

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  • The relationship of non-cognitive factors to academic and clinical performance in graduate rehabilitation science students in the United States: a systematic review
    Kelly Reynolds, Caroline Bazemore, Cannon Hanebuth, Steph Hendren, Maggie Horn
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 31.     CrossRef
Research articles
The relationship of examinees’ individual characteristics and perceived acceptability of smart device-based testing to test scores on the practice test of the Korea Emergency Medicine Technician Licensing Examination  
Eun Young Lim, Mi Kyoung Yim, Sun Huh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:33.   Published online December 27, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.33
  • 17,638 View
  • 224 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Smart device-based testing (SBT) is being introduced into the Republic of Korea’s high-stakes examination system, starting with the Korean Emergency Medicine Technician Licensing Examination (KEMTLE) in December 2017. In order to minimize the effects of variation in examinees’ environment on test scores, this study aimed to identify any associations of variables related to examinees’ individual characteristics and their perceived acceptability of SBT with their SBT practice test scores.
Methods
Of the 569 candidate students who took the KEMTLE on September 12, 2015, 560 responded to a survey questionnaire on the acceptability of SBT after the examination. The questionnaire addressed 8 individual characteristics and contained 2 satisfaction, 9 convenience, and 9 preference items. A comparative analysis according to individual variables was performed. Furthermore, a generalized linear model (GLM) analysis was conducted to identify the effects of individual characteristics and perceived acceptability of SBT on test scores.
Results
Among those who preferred SBT over paper-and-pencil testing, test scores were higher for male participants (mean± standard deviation [SD], 4.36± 0.72) than for female participants (mean± SD, 4.21± 0.73). According to the GLM, no variables evaluated— including gender and experience with computer-based testing, SBT, or using a tablet PC—showed a statistically significant relationship with the total score, scores on multimedia items, or scores on text items.
Conclusion
Individual characteristics and perceived acceptability of SBT did not affect the SBT practice test scores of emergency medicine technician students in Korea. It should be possible to adopt SBT for the KEMTLE without interference from the variables examined in this study.

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  • Application of computer-based testing in the Korean Medical Licensing Examination, the emergence of the metaverse in medical education, journal metrics and statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 2.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Student Satisfaction with Ubiquitous-Based Tests in Women’s Health Nursing Course
    Mi-Young An, Yun-Mi Kim
    Healthcare.2021; 9(12): 1664.     CrossRef
Comparison of standard-setting methods for the Korean Radiological Technologist Licensing Examination: Angoff, Ebel, bookmark, and Hofstee  
Janghee Park, Duck-Sun Ahn, Mi Kyoung Yim, Jaehyoung Lee
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:32.   Published online December 26, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.32
  • 17,330 View
  • 213 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to compare the possible standard-setting methods for the Korean Radiological Technologist Licensing Examination, which has a fixed cut score, and to suggest the most appropriate method.
Methods
Six radiological technology professors set standards for 250 items on the Korean Radiological Technologist Licensing Examination administered in December 2016 using the Angoff, Ebel, bookmark, and Hofstee methods.
Results
With a maximum percentile score of 100, the cut score for the examination was 71.27 using the Angoff method, 62.2 using the Ebel method, 64.49 using the bookmark method, and 62 using the Hofstee method. Based on the Hofstee method, an acceptable cut score for the examination would be between 52.83 and 70, but the cut score was 71.27 using the Angoff method.
Conclusion
The above results suggest that the best standard-setting method to determine the cut score would be a panel discussion with the modified Angoff or Ebel method, with verification of the rated results by the Hofstee method. Since no standard-setting method has yet been adopted for the Korean Radiological Technologist Licensing Examination, this study will be able to provide practical guidance for introducing a standard-setting process.

Citations

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  • The challenges inherent with anchor-based approaches to the interpretation of important change in clinical outcome assessments
    Kathleen W. Wyrwich, Geoffrey R. Norman
    Quality of Life Research.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison of the validity of bookmark and Angoff standard setting methods in medical performance tests
    Majid Yousefi Afrashteh
    BMC Medical Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparing the cut score for the borderline group method and borderline regression method with norm-referenced standard setting in an objective structured clinical examination in medical school in Korea
    Song Yi Park, Sang-Hwa Lee, Min-Jeong Kim, Ki-Hwan Ji, Ji Ho Ryu
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 25.     CrossRef
  • Using the Angoff method to set a standard on mock exams for the Korean Nursing Licensing Examination
    Mi Kyoung Yim, Sujin Shin
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 14.     CrossRef
  • Performance of the Ebel standard-setting method for the spring 2019 Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada internal medicine certification examination consisting of multiple-choice questions
    Jimmy Bourque, Haley Skinner, Jonathan Dupré, Maria Bacchus, Martha Ainslie, Irene W. Y. Ma, Gary Cole
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 12.     CrossRef
  • Similarity of the cut score in test sets with different item amounts using the modified Angoff, modified Ebel, and Hofstee standard-setting methods for the Korean Medical Licensing Examination
    Janghee Park, Mi Kyoung Yim, Na Jin Kim, Duck Sun Ahn, Young-Min Kim
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 28.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions